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I want create own "Like it" Facebook button - similar with my website design.

I know that Facebook use special "secure" method to authorize "Like it" clicks.

But I think I know how to hack it and create own styled and working "Like it" Facebook button.

I hear that this it's not allowed by facebook rules and here I asking - is there any side effect from Facebook? Can they block my account?

UPDATE:

I changed my decision.

I will stay with facebook standard button.

There is no sense and not worth it to modify this button :/

  • This should be a message to Facebook support. – Adam Robinson Jan 20 '11 at 20:30
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    They would certainly suspend your API keys that were used for the Liking, and probably whatever FB account created them. You might also earn your website an IP ban if you try doing it more than once. – Tesserex Jan 20 '11 at 20:32
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Yes, they can do whatever they want if you violate their ToS. Facebook is a stickler for maintaining its brand, and modifying the Like button would definitely not make them happy. Save yourself the trouble and just use what they give you.

  • Then how come I have seen many different styled Like buttons?All are hacked? – techie_28 Sep 21 '12 at 6:56
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    No, they are probably share buttons - share buttons can be styled, but like bottons not. – BlueMark Sep 22 '12 at 18:43
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Hacking the like function? Assuming there was some way to "hack" this it would definitely be a TOS violation.

If you mean, however, creating custom actions for posts generated by apps, that is within the Graph API. Start out by learning to use the Facebook API by looking at its documentation. Create an app in the Facebook system first. http://developers.facebook.com/docs/

After you've learned all about requesting permissions and proper usage of the FB dialogs and user content-control system (this includes best practices and rules), you'll find a special parameter submitted with the set for "posts" in the api called "actions." This property accepts a JSON object of the link text and link to forward to. Please note they do not allow your action names to collide with any of the Facebook core actions. Naming your custom action "like" and having it lead elsewhere is DEFINITELY a bad idea and will probably get your appID deleted.

http://developers.facebook.com/docs/reference/api/post/

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You can use Facebook's share url to make your own buttons, and connect them to services like sharedcounter.com api (or build your own request to the Facebook api) to have the total "like" count. Example (hover on the heart sign on the left)

  • Thanks, this can be usefull sometimes, but "Share button" is not equal "Like button", both have some different functions. – BlueMark Sep 21 '12 at 8:21
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    A "share" has more value than a "like". Plus with this technique you control more finely what exactly you need users to download. Especially relevant to mobile phones. – pixeline Sep 21 '12 at 19:13
  • According to Facebook: "Like button improves clickthrough rates by allowing users to connect with one click, and by allowing them to see which of their friends have already connected". Sure, Share button have more options to post, but Like button is simply quick and easy. Value of both buttons is already the same, but click rates are higher with "Like". – BlueMark Sep 22 '12 at 18:39
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    Facebook can say what they want: to "share" something means greater involvement from the user than simply "liking" something. As for seeing who from my friends liked that content, it feels overkill to me - not to say on the limit of what one online service can morally do with their user's privacy rights. Finally, the provided "like" button code costs a lot in term of loading time and size. Unmobile friendly. – pixeline Sep 22 '12 at 20:05

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