14

I'm trying to write a function to perform substitutions of environment variables in java. So if I had a string that looked like this:

User ${USERNAME}'s APPDATA path is ${APPDATA}.

I want the result to be:

User msmith's APPDATA path is C:\Users\msmith\AppData\Roaming.

So far my broken implementation looks like this:

public static String expandEnvVars(String text) {        
    Map<String, String> envMap = System.getenv();
    String pattern = "\\$\\{([A-Za-z0-9]+)\\}";
    Pattern expr = Pattern.compile(pattern);
    Matcher matcher = expr.matcher(text);
    if (matcher.matches()) {
        for (int i = 1; i <= matcher.groupCount(); i++) {
            String envValue = envMap.get(matcher.group(i).toUpperCase());
            if (envValue == null) {
                envValue = "";
            } else {
                envValue = envValue.replace("\\", "\\\\");
            }
            Pattern subexpr = Pattern.compile("\\$\\{" + matcher.group(i) + "\\}");
            text = subexpr.matcher(text).replaceAll(envValue);
        }
    }
    return text;
}

Using the above sample text, matcher.matches() returns false. However if my sample text, is ${APPDATA} it works.

Can anyone help?

15

You don't want to use matches(). Matches will try to match the entire input string.

Attempts to match the entire region against the pattern.

What you want is while(matcher.find()) {. That will match each instance of your pattern. Check out the documentation for find().

Within each match, group 0 will be the entire matched string (${appdata}) and group 1 will be the appdata part.

Your end result should look something like:

String pattern = "\\$\\{([A-Za-z0-9]+)\\}";
Pattern expr = Pattern.compile(pattern);
Matcher matcher = expr.matcher(text);
while (matcher.find()) {
    String envValue = envMap.get(matcher.group(1).toUpperCase());
    if (envValue == null) {
        envValue = "";
    } else {
        envValue = envValue.replace("\\", "\\\\");
    }
    Pattern subexpr = Pattern.compile(Pattern.quote(matcher.group(0)));
    text = subexpr.matcher(text).replaceAll(envValue);
}
  • Your example with matcher.group(0) throws because the ${} parts of the returned string must be escaped for this case. So I used "\\$\\{" + matcher.group(1) + "\\}" for expression instead. – Michael Smith Jan 20 '11 at 21:56
  • @Michael, thanks for pointing that out. See my edit to get that to work. (hint, Pattern.quote()) – jjnguy Jan 20 '11 at 21:58
13

If you don't want to write the code for yourself, the Apache Commons Lang library has a class called StrSubstitutor. It does exactly this.

3

The following alternative has the desired effect without resorting to a library:

  • reads the map of environment variables once at startup
  • on calling expandEnvVars() takes the text with potential placeholders as an argument
  • the method then goes through the map of environment variables, one entry at at time, fetches the entry's key and value
  • and tries to replace any occurrence of ${<key>} in the text with <value>, thereby expanding the placeholders to their current values in the environment
    private static Map<String, String> envMap = System.getenv();        
    public static String expandEnvVars(String text) {        
        for (Entry<String, String> entry : envMap.entrySet()) {
            String key = entry.getKey();
            String value = entry.getValue();
            text = text.replaceAll("\\$\\{" + key + "\\}", value);
        }
        return text;
    }
  • 2
    +1. This one is more compact than a library. When working under windows with paths I prefer String value = entry.getValue().replace('\\', '/'); because otherwhise the "\" char is interpreted as escape which results in an invalid paths – k3b Jun 13 '13 at 15:29
  • While the accepted solution works, this one is more efficient since it doesn't need to use regular expressions. – Dave C Mar 12 '14 at 18:42
  • 2
    @Dave C String # replaceAll uses regular expressions under the hood – Bax Oct 30 '14 at 15:54
  • In the future, please explain the solution instead of just dumping a code block. – Gray -- SO stop being evil Jul 6 '18 at 14:01
  • Depending on the number of set environment variables, this solution may be a lot less efficient than the accepted solution, because it scans the text for each set environment variable separately. The accepted solution scans the text once. – rboehme Sep 19 '18 at 11:01
2

Based on the accepted answer but without nested pattern replacement. Supports also default value and underscores in env-name: ${env-var[:default]}

  static String substituteEnvVars(String text) {
        StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
        String pattern = "\\$\\{([A-Za-z0-9_]+)(?::([^\\}]*))?\\}";
        Pattern expr = Pattern.compile(pattern);
        Matcher matcher = expr.matcher(text);
        while (matcher.find()) {
            final String varname = matcher.group(1);
            String envValue = System.getenv(varname);
            if (envValue == null) {
                envValue = matcher.group(2);
                if (envValue == null)
                    envValue = "";
            }
            matcher.appendReplacement(sb, envValue);
        }
        matcher.appendTail(sb);
        return sb.toString();
    }

In additon variables are exactly substituted once. Text "${VAR}${X}" with VAR=${X} and X=x will be return "${X}x" not "xx".

  • @Gray, (?:X) is a non-capturing group, your change wasn't code fix. Found it already in java 1.5 docs (docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/regex/…) – lexx9999 Jul 10 '18 at 13:21
  • Sorry @lexx9999. I've been using regex for a decade now and didn't know that. I also tested your code and thought it didn't work but it does now for me. Sigh. Rolled back. – Gray -- SO stop being evil Jul 10 '18 at 14:48
  • @lexx9999, I'm naïeve; is that :default syntax from somewhere or did you make it up? – Brad Turek Jan 2 '19 at 1:20
2

I've taken @lexx9999 code and tweaked it a bit to use a StringBuilder and handle a Map as well as environmental variables.

private final static Pattern ENV_VAR_PATTERN =
    Pattern.compile("\\$\\{([A-Za-z0-9_.-]+)(?::([^\\}]*))?\\}");
/**
 * Handle "hello ${var}", "${var:default}" formats for environ variable expansion.
 */
public static String substituteEnvVars(String text) {
    return substituteEnvVars(text, System.getenv());
}
/**
 * Handle "hello ${var}", "${var:default}", find var in replaceMap replace value.
 */
public static String substituteEnvVars(String text, Map<String, ?> replaceMap) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    Matcher matcher = ENV_VAR_PATTERN.matcher(text);
    int index = 0;
    while (matcher.find()) {
        sb.append(text, index, matcher.start());
        String var = matcher.group(1);
        Object obj = replaceMap.get(var);
        String value;
        if (obj != null)
            value = String.valueOf(obj);
        else {
            // if no env variable, see if a default value was specified
            value = matcher.group(2);
            if (value == null)
                value = "";
        }
        sb.append(value);
        index = matcher.end();
    }
    sb.append(text, index, text.length());
    return sb.toString();
}
0

Unless you're just trying to learn how to build things from scratch, you should not really bother implementing your own template engine - there are multitudes already available.

One very good one is FreeMarker (which has Java API). Here is a tutorial.

  • I just found Apache commons org.apache.commons.exec.util.StringUtils.stringSubstitution(), it does exactly what I want, and we're already using exec. – Michael Smith Jan 20 '11 at 21:47

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