1

I have the following struct:

 typedef struct P{
     int age;
     char gender;
     int weight;
 }Person;

I'm working with blocks of data. So all of my data are inside char Person_Data[50];

The expected outcome is to move the data from Person_Data to my struct. In order to achieve this I'm using memcpy, having in mind that inside Person_Data I can store either int or char(or anything else I might add).

I wrote a code for a testable example:

char Person_Data[50];
size_t offset = 0;
memset(Person_Data + offset, 24, sizeof(int));
offset += sizeof(int);
memset(Person_Data + offset, 'M', sizeof(char));
offset += sizeof(char);
memset(Person_Data + offset, 55, sizeof(int));

printf("Age = %d, Gender = %c, weight = %d\n", *(Person_Data), *(Person_Data +  sizeof(int)), *(Person_Data + sizeof(int) + sizeof(char)));

Until this point we can see that the data inside my string are passed correctly, maintaining their type. (I guess from what I have read in various books).

Now I pass the data from Person_Data to my struct:

Person *Person1 = malloc(sizeof(Person));
offset = 0;
memcpy(&Person1->age, Person_Data + offset, sizeof(int));
offset += sizeof(int);
memcpy(&Person1->gender, Person_Data + offset, sizeof(char));
offset += sizeof(char);
memcpy(&Person1->weight, Person_Data + offset, sizeof(int));

printf("Age = %d, Gender = %c, weight = %d\n", Person1->age, Person1->gender, Person1->weight);

As we can see the output of the above code is

Age = 24, Gender = M, weight = 55
Age = 404232216, Gender = M, weight = 926365495

So, the 2 int have not passed correctly into the struct.

That got me wondering and I tried this with memset like this:

memset(&Person1->age, *(Person_Data + offset), sizeof(int));

But it didn't work also. So the last attempt was to pass the int like this:

Person1->age = *(Person_Data);

After doing this I saw that the age was passed correctly. My thought is whether this is correct.

How the "=" operator knows how many bytes to pass?

Shouldn't memcpy/memset do the work since the third argument is how many bytes to copy?

Thank you.

2
  • "So, the 2 int have not passed correctly into the struct." NO! They haven't. You are ignoring padding of your struct and by accident get what you expect. Also you pass wrong type to printf. – Gerhardh Nov 29 '17 at 12:26
  • 7
    You're experiencing alignment issues. to get the offset of a strucure member, you should use offsetof (<stddef.h>). – Alexis Pierru Nov 29 '17 at 12:27
9

Whatever you want to do, don't do it that way.

char Person_Data[50];
size_t offset = 0;
memset(Person_Data + offset, 24, sizeof(int));
offset += sizeof(int);
memset(Person_Data + offset, 'M', sizeof(char));
offset += sizeof(char);
memset(Person_Data + offset, 55, sizeof(int));

This will create the following memory layout (ints assumed to be 32 bit):

+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+
|18|18|18|18| M|37|37|37|37|xx|xx|xx| 
+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+
 \   int   /char\  pad / \   int   / 

You copy into wrong locations.

Why does printing seem to work? Because you don't print int values but only char.

printf("Age = %d, Gender = %c, weight = %d\n", *(Person_Data), *(Person_Data + sizeof(int)), *(Person_Data + sizeof(int) + sizeof(char)));

The single character values are read from memory and promoted to int before passing to printf.

As a general rule:

  • Don't calculate offsets, but use offsetof as already suggested in comments.
  • Don't use memset to fill integers.
  • Don't mess around with char arrays if you want to use structures.
2
  • So to get this right, memset shouldn't be used for that or the mistake is only at calculating the offset, and not using offsetof? – Fanarosss Nov 29 '17 at 12:40
  • 1
    Wrong offset is not the only problem. Read the manual for memset. it writes 4 identical bytes into your int storage. – Gerhardh Nov 29 '17 at 12:41
5

memset is not designed for setting values of objects other than arrays of characters or bytes. memset fills every byte of the destination with the same value. When you use memset(destination, 24, sizeof(int)), you are filling each byte with the value 24. Those combined bytes make a very larger integer value.

Although you fill the age field with a large integer, you do not see it in your printf because you pass the value to printf using *(Person_data). Since Person_data is a pointer to char, this expression only fetches one character from the object, so it only gets one of the bytes containing 24. In contrast, when you use Person1->age, age is an int, so the entire int is fetched.

Additionally, you should not assume you can simply add the sizes of objects in a structure to get the addresses of the members. Most hardware architectures have alignment requirements for data, meaning that objects of more than one byte must start at memory addresses that are multiples of their size or of values such as two, four, or eight bytes. When you declare a structure with diverse object types in it, the compiler includes some unused space between them to make the alignments correct. There is an offsetof macro in the <stddef.h> header that will give you the offsets of members within a structure. (I am assuming this code is just for exploring how C works and not for use in a real product. If it were for use in a real product, this is very bad code for that.)

The assignment operator = knows how many bytes to move because the compiler knows the type of the left operand (because you have declared the type previously in your source code).

If you do want to set an int to 24 by writing to its individual bytes, then you have to put 24 in its low-valued byte and 0 in its other bytes. However, which byte is the low-valued byte varies from system to system. Some hardware architectures put the low-valued byte in the low address, and some put it in the high address. (And, if you want to set an int to a value greater than fits into a byte, you have to break it into multiple bytes and write those.)

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