3

I feel stuck trying to bring life to a basic CASE statement:

MATCH (n)
WITH id(n)%2 as r,
    CASE r 
        WHEN 1 THEN "odd" 
        WHEN 0 THEN "even" 
    END AS result
RETURN result

The error I'm getting is "Variable r not defined". I've tried pretty much everything. I'm not solving any other problem but making the CASE statement work for educational purposes.

3

Try:

MATCH (n)
WITH id(n)%2 AS r
RETURN CASE r WHEN 1 THEN "odd" WHEN 0 THEN "even" END AS result

You have to first define r as a variable and then you'll be able to use it in the next WITH/RETURN clause. See the docs on the scope of variables:

Variables are not carried over to subsequent queries. If multiple query parts are chained together using WITH, variables have to be listed in the WITH clause to be carried over to the next part.

Update, based on @logisima's comment. You can even omit the whole WITH:

MATCH (n)
RETURN CASE id(n)%2 WHEN 1 THEN 'odd' WHEN 0 THEN 'even' END AS result
  • 2
    And because in the query the r variable is not needed, we can directly do this : MATCH (n) RETURN CASE id(n)%2 WHEN 1 THEN "odd" WHEN 0 THEN "even" END AS result – logisima Nov 29 '17 at 18:08
  • Yes, I understand that I can do without that variable, but if I still wanted to define it, what would be the proper way to do that? – vanhemt Nov 29 '17 at 18:57
  • 1
    The first query in @Gabor's answer does that. That query can also be simplified by replacing WHEN 0 THEN with ELSE. – cybersam Nov 29 '17 at 19:16
2

For this simple use case, you actually don't need either WITH or CASE:

MATCH (n)
RETURN ['even', 'odd'][id(n)%2] AS result;
  • Yes, but I was still intent on making the CASE work - for the sake of educational value. – vanhemt Nov 29 '17 at 18:59
  • Aside from my original intention, you are using a very interesting syntax I mean the two pairs of [square brackets]. Could you please expand on why the statement works the way it does? What is the official name of that syntax? Looks like some kind of a list operation, but I'd like to look it up in the manual. – vanhemt Nov 30 '17 at 3:41
  • The first set of square brackets specifies a list of 2 strings. The immediately following set of square brackets are simply accessing one of the elements of that list by index. The remainder of division by 2 is always either 0 or 1, so the remainder is suitable for indexing into a 2-element list. – cybersam Nov 30 '17 at 3:47
1

You can use another WITH:

MATCH (n)
WITH id(n) % 2 as r
RETURN CASE r WHEN 1 THEN "odd" WHEN 0 THEN "even" END AS result
  • It was your comment that got me enlightened. You are mentioning "another WITH", but if you look at my original post, you will see that the only difference is the comma, as I said in my answer. – vanhemt Nov 29 '17 at 18:34
  • No, it's crazier than I thought. Your version works, indeed. But the one in my original post doesn't. The difference between them is that mine has a separate RETURN statement, while yours has an inline RETURN statement. So, it's more than just the comma. And I had to put a comma because without one, Cypher didn't even recognize the CASE statement as such. – vanhemt Nov 29 '17 at 18:50
1

One could also use the ELSE clause in the CASE statement

MATCH (n)
RETURN
    CASE id(n)%2 
        WHEN 1 THEN "odd" 
        ELSE "even" 
    END AS result

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