318

I need to create a form that will display something based on the return value of an API. I'm working with the following code:

class App extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = {value: ''};

    this.handleChange = this.handleChange.bind(this);
    this.handleSubmit = this.handleSubmit.bind(this);
  }

  handleChange(event) {
    this.setState({value: event.target.value});
  }

  handleSubmit(event) {
    alert('A name was submitted: ' + this.state.value); //error here
    event.preventDefault();
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <form onSubmit={this.handleSubmit}>
        <label>
          Name:
          <input type="text" value={this.state.value} onChange={this.handleChange} /> // error here
        </label>
        <input type="submit" value="Submit" />
      </form>
    );
  }
}

I'm getting the following error:

error TS2339: Property 'value' does not exist on type 'Readonly<{}>'.

I got this error in the two lines I commented on the code. This code isn't even mine, I got it from the react official site (https://reactjs.org/docs/forms.html), but it isn't working here.

Im using the create-react-app tool.

2

9 Answers 9

501

The Component is defined like so:

interface Component<P = {}, S = {}> extends ComponentLifecycle<P, S> { }

Meaning that the default type for the state (and props) is: {}.
If you want your component to have value in the state then you need to define it like this:

class App extends React.Component<{}, { value: string }> {
    ...
}

Or:

type MyProps = { ... };
type MyState = { value: string };
class App extends React.Component<MyProps, MyState> {
    ...
}
3
  • 7
    omg, ty dude, it worked now, just answer me one more thing, this syntax is related to TypeScript right? because in react official site it doesnt have anything similar Commented Nov 29, 2017 at 23:36
  • 10
    Yes, this is strictly typescript related. Commented Nov 30, 2017 at 0:11
  • 3
    The right define is: class Square extends React.Component<{ value: string }, { }> { ... } Commented Jun 14, 2019 at 8:54
118
interface MyProps {
  ...
}

interface MyState {
  value: string
}

class App extends React.Component<MyProps, MyState> {
  ...
}

// Or with hooks, something like

const App = ({}: MyProps) => {
  const [value, setValue] = useState<string>('');
  ...
};

type's are fine too like in @nitzan-tomer's answer, as long as you're consistent.

1
  • 2
    Please sum up what consistent means in the context of your post so that it's possible to have its full value without the need to read the medium article (which is a great useful link, thank you). Commented May 16, 2019 at 18:12
52

If you don't want to pass interface state or props model you can try this

class App extends React.Component <any, any>
1
  • Useful if you are using base component and overriding state interface. Commented Jun 15, 2023 at 23:20
22

I suggest to use

for string only state values

export default class Home extends React.Component<{}, { [key: string]: string }> { }

for string key and any type of state values

export default class Home extends React.Component<{}, { [key: string]: any}> { }

for any key / any values

export default class Home extends React.Component<{}, { [key: any]: any}> {}
16

The problem is you haven't declared your interface state replace any with your suitable variable type of the 'value'

Here is a good reference

interface AppProps {
   //code related to your props goes here
}

interface AppState {
   value: any
}

class App extends React.Component<AppProps, AppState> {
  // ...
}
2

According to the official ReactJs documentation, you need to pass argument in the default format witch is:

P = {} // default for your props
S = {} // default for yout state

interface Component<P = {}, S = {}> extends ComponentLifecycle<P, S> { }

Or to define your own type like below: (just an exp)

interface IProps {
    clients: Readonly<IClientModel[]>;

    onSubmit: (data: IClientModel) => void;
}

interface IState {
   clients: Readonly<IClientModel[]>;
   loading: boolean;
}

class ClientsPage extends React.Component<IProps, IState> {
  // ...
}

typescript and react whats react component P S mean

how to statically type react components with typescript

1

There is another way to get rid of that error, in case you want to avoid typescript syntax. Using class fields, you can initialize state without this and the constructor. Infact, you can get rid of the constructor completely. This allows ts to understand the properties of the state and doesn't generate error.

class App extends React.Component {
  state = {
    value: '',
  };

  handleChange(event) {
    this.setState({value: event.target.value});
  }

  handleSubmit(event) {
    alert('A name was submitted: ' + this.state.value); //error here
    event.preventDefault();
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <form onSubmit={this.handleSubmit}>
        <label>
          Name:
          <input type="text" value={this.state.value} onChange={this.handleChange} /> // error here
        </label>
        <input type="submit" value="Submit" />
      </form>
    );
  }
}

Ref: Is the constructor still needed in React with autobinding and property initializers

0

This worked for me

<TextInput 
  onChange={(e:**any**)=> inputValue(e.target.value)} 
  maxLength={10} 
  keyboardType='numeric' 
  style={styles.inputField}
/>
2
  • Using any should only be used as a last resort where there is no other way to specify the correct type e.g. if you don't know it and have no way of knowing it or when the type can genuinely be anything.
    – apokryfos
    Commented Mar 5 at 11:00
  • 1
    Your answer could be improved with additional supporting information. Please edit to add further details, such as citations or documentation, so that others can confirm that your answer is correct. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Commented Mar 6 at 12:34
-1

My solution

    import React, { ChangeEvent, FormEvent } from "react";
    
    interface NameFormProps {
    }
    
    interface NameFormState {
      value: string
    }
    
    export default class NameForm extends React.Component<NameFormProps, NameFormState> {
      constructor(props: any) {
        super(props);
        this.state = {value: ''};
    
        this.handleChange = this.handleChange.bind(this);
        this.handleSubmit = this.handleSubmit.bind(this);
      }
    
      handleChange(event: ChangeEvent<HTMLInputElement>) {
        this.setState({value: event.target.value});
    }
    
      handleSubmit(event: FormEvent<HTMLFormElement>) {
        alert('A name was submitted: ' + this.state.value);
        event.preventDefault();
      }
    
      render() {
        return (
          <form onSubmit={this.handleSubmit}>
            <label>
              Name:
              <input type="text" value={this.state.value} onChange={this.handleChange} />
            </label>
            <input type="submit" value="Submit" />
          </form>
        );
      }
    }
1
  • 1
    As it’s currently written, your answer is unclear. Please edit to add additional details that will help others understand how this addresses the question asked. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Commented May 12, 2022 at 7:11

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