Why is my code reporting that this process is taking up to 5 seconds to finish even though it isn't even taking a quarter of a second in real time?

I will attempt to bolden the code specifically related to the stopwatch in order to keep you from having to look through it all. Be kind as this is my first post ever so I'm sorry if it's clumsy. It looks like if the code isn't boldened, there will be ** around the pieces in question.

*background: this is for a math essay. It's supposed to be a program that finds prime factors and tells the time of how long it takes to find them. It is working in finding the prime factors, but the stopwatch is reporting a ridiculous number in seconds. Also, this code is most heavily influenced by

http://www.geeksforgeeks.org/print-all-prime-factors-of-a-given-number/

with the stopwatch, user input function, and repetition being added either by my own thought or with help of others*

    // Program to print all prime factors
import java.io.*;
import java.lang.Math;
import java.util.Scanner;
import java.text.DecimalFormat;

class primeFactorer4
{
    **static long startTime = System.nanoTime();**
    // A function to print all prime factors
    // of a given number n
    public static void primeFactors(long n)
    {
        // Print the number of 2s that divide n
        while (n%2==0)
        {
            System.out.print(2 + " ");
            n /= 2;
        }

        // n must be odd at this point.  So we can
        // skip one element (Note i = i +2)
        for (int i = 3; i <= Math.sqrt(n); i+= 2)
        {
            // While i divides n, print i and divide n
            while (n%i == 0)
            {
                System.out.print(i + " ");
                n /= i;
            }
        }

        // This condition is to handle the case whien
        // n is a prime number greater than 2
        if (n > 2)
            System.out.print(n);
    }

    public static void main (String[] args)
    {
        Console console = System.console();
        String input = console.readLine("Enter input:");
        long n = Long.valueOf(input);
        for (int k=1; k<=10; k++)
    {
        primeFactors(n);
        System.out.println(" Try " + k);
    }
        **double endTime = System.nanoTime();
        double totalTime = endTime - startTime;
        DecimalFormat totalTimeFormat = new DecimalFormat("##.###");
        System.out.println("    Time taken in seconds:" + totalTimeFormat.format(totalTime/10/1000000000));**
        primeFactorer4.main(args);
    //reason for the weird division is for clarity. "totalTime" is the time surpassed 
    //to repeat all the methods, the "10" in the middle is to get the mean total time
    //of all the primeFactors cycles, and the "1000000000" at the end is to convert nanoseconds into seconds
    }
}

The reason why I made 10 calls to primeFactors is because I wanted my computer to do the mean of the results for me, since any school will tell you that when experimenting, you need to repeat your IV level 3(or more) times to get more accurate results

  • You can always stick the method in a for loop and make the code cleaner. – UghThatGUyAgain Nov 30 '17 at 2:53
  • Computer math is not a scientific experiment. Calling it ten times is pointless. – Elliott Frisch Nov 30 '17 at 2:54
  • this isn't the whole experiment. I was putting this results of this in a graph relating the size of the number and the time to find the prime factors and then finding the regression line, which my teacher told me is the minimum required to make it math related lol. My subject is prime factors and really the only way I know to make prime factors interesting as an essay is when discussing cryptography. – regazzo Nov 30 '17 at 2:58
  • ok so I did the for loop like you said and now it's cleaner but I'm still getting absurd times. – regazzo Nov 30 '17 at 3:22
  • What happens if you change the declaration of endTime from a double to a long? I'm wondering if you've been affected by the sparseness of double values in the range of the current nanotime. – Dawood ibn Kareem Nov 30 '17 at 3:29

Okay nevermind I solved my problem. I put a println command under the startTime and endTime variables and I found that the startTime variable was starting when the program was initiatiated, NOT when the user inputs the number they want factored. It is now giving me appropriate results that dont feel to be related to my personal speed of inputting numbers.

For those interested in the program, the solution of this problem applies to you, or you are simply interested in seeing the contrast between the solution and the problem, here is the new code.

    // Program to print all prime factors
import java.io.*;
import java.lang.Math;
import java.util.Scanner;
import java.text.DecimalFormat;

class primeFactorer4
{

    // A function to print all prime factors
    // of a given number n
    public static void primeFactors(long n)
        {
            // Print the number of 2s that divide n
            while (n%2==0)
            {
                System.out.print(2 + " ");
                n /= 2;
            }

            // n must be odd at this point.  So we can
            // skip one element (Note i = i +2)
            for (int i = 3; i <= Math.sqrt(n); i+= 2)
            {
                // While i divides n, print i and divide n
                while (n%i == 0)
                {
                    System.out.print(i + " ");
                    n /= i;
                }
            }

            // This condition is to handle the case whien
            // n is a prime number greater than 2
            if (n > 2)
                System.out.print(n);
        }



    public static void main (String[] args)
    {
        Console console = System.console();
        String input = console.readLine("Enter input:");
        long n = Long.valueOf(input);
        long startTime = System.nanoTime();
        System.out.println(startTime);
        for (int k=1; k<=10; k++)
        {
            primeFactors(n);
            System.out.println(" Try " + k);
        }
        double endTime = System.nanoTime();
            System.out.println(endTime);
            double totalTime = endTime - startTime;
            DecimalFormat totalTimeFormat = new DecimalFormat("##.##########");
            System.out.println("    Time taken in seconds:" + totalTimeFormat.format(totalTime/10/1000000000));
        primeFactorer4.main(args);
    //reason for the weird division is for clarity. "totalTime" is the time surpassed 
    //to repeat all the methods, the "10" in the middle is to get the mean total time
    //of all the primeFactors cycles, and the "1e9" at the end is to convert nanoseconds into seconds
    }
}

I wrote something for you, I think this may be quicker, and thus more accurate but keep in mind that it takes time to execute ANY statement so it cannot be EXACTLY accurate.

long start= System.currentTimeMillis(); //start time
//Insert code here
long difference = System.currentTimeMillis(); //finish time
difference -= start;
System.out.println("Time took to run code was " + difference);; //Print the amount of time that it took
  • Thanks brenann, yours looks less complicated and much neater than mine but I found my solution and it is working fine. – regazzo Nov 30 '17 at 4:02

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