1

i'm working on a program that allocate lots of []int with length 4,3,2
and found using a:=[]{1,1,1} is a little bit fast than a:=make([]int,3) a[0] = 1 a[1]=1 a[2]= 1

my question: why a:=[]{1,1,1} is faster than a:=make([]int,3) a[0] = 1 a[1]=1 a[2]= 1?

func BenchmarkMake(b *testing.B) {
    var array []int
    for i := 0; i < b.N; i++ {
        array = make([]int, 4)
        array[0] = 1
        array[1] = 1
        array[2] = 1
        array[3] = 1
    }
}

func BenchmarkDirect(b *testing.B) {
    var array []int
    for i := 0; i < b.N; i++ {
        array = []int{1, 1, 1, 1}
    }

    array[0] = 1
}

BenchmarkMake-4 50000000 34.3 ns/op
BenchmarkDirect-4 50000000 33.8 ns/op

5
  • Check the corresponding assembly generated. – zerkms Nov 30 '17 at 8:48
  • If you know the length a priori why not use [4]int type? – Grzegorz Żur Nov 30 '17 at 10:02
  • [][]intwill save this []intallocated, and in outer loop, there are deep copy about [][]int. and this []int is not always 4, it may be 4 or 3 or 2. after google about how to generate assemble code in golang, the performance diff comes from array[1] = 1, there is runtime out of bound check. – Terry Pang Nov 30 '17 at 12:03
  • @TerryPang I added and analyzed the dissasembler code in the answer to prove your point and also found out why the first assignment takes less time. – Grzegorz Żur Dec 2 '17 at 12:51
  • @Grzegorz Żur Array is fast cause it is allocated from stack instead of heap(i'm still digging why), when the this size grows to 4M, allocate array will slow than make slice. – Terry Pang Dec 4 '17 at 4:26
1

Let's look at benchmark output of the following code

package main

import "testing"

func BenchmarkMake(b *testing.B) {
    var array []int
    for i := 0; i < b.N; i++ {
        array = make([]int, 4)
        array[0] = 1
        array[1] = 1
        array[2] = 1
        array[3] = 1
    }
}

func BenchmarkDirect(b *testing.B) {
    var array []int
    for i := 0; i < b.N; i++ {
        array = []int{1, 1, 1, 1}
    }
    array[0] = 1
}

func BenchmarkArray(b *testing.B) {
    var array [4]int
    for i := 0; i < b.N; i++ {
        array = [4]int{1, 1, 1, 1}
    }
    array[0] = 1
}

Usually the output looks like that

$ go test -bench . -benchmem -o alloc_test -cpuprofile cpu.prof
goos: linux
goarch: amd64
pkg: test
BenchmarkMake-8         30000000                61.3 ns/op            32 B/op          1 allocs/op
BenchmarkDirect-8       20000000                60.2 ns/op            32 B/op          1 allocs/op
BenchmarkArray-8        1000000000               2.56 ns/op            0 B/op          0 allocs/op
PASS
ok      test    6.003s

The difference is so small that it can be the opposite in some circumstances.

Let's look at the profiling data

$go tool pprof -list 'Benchmark.*' cpu.prof 

ROUTINE ======================== test.BenchmarkMake in /home/grzesiek/go/src/test/alloc_test.go
     260ms      1.59s (flat, cum) 24.84% of Total
         .          .      5:func BenchmarkMake(b *testing.B) {
         .          .      6:   var array []int
      40ms       40ms      7:   for i := 0; i < b.N; i++ {
      50ms      1.38s      8:       array = make([]int, 4)
         .          .      9:       array[0] = 1
     130ms      130ms     10:       array[1] = 1
      20ms       20ms     11:       array[2] = 1
      20ms       20ms     12:       array[3] = 1
         .          .     13:   }
         .          .     14:}
ROUTINE ======================== test.BenchmarkDirect in /home/grzesiek/go/src/test/alloc_test.go
      90ms      1.66s (flat, cum) 25.94% of Total
         .          .     16:func BenchmarkDirect(b *testing.B) {
         .          .     17:   var array []int
      10ms       10ms     18:   for i := 0; i < b.N; i++ {
      80ms      1.65s     19:       array = []int{1, 1, 1, 1}
         .          .     20:   }
         .          .     21:   array[0] = 1
         .          .     22:}
ROUTINE ======================== test.BenchmarkArray in /home/grzesiek/go/src/test/alloc_test.go
     2.86s      2.86s (flat, cum) 44.69% of Total
         .          .     24:func BenchmarkArray(b *testing.B) {
         .          .     25:   var array [4]int
     500ms      500ms     26:   for i := 0; i < b.N; i++ {
     2.36s      2.36s     27:       array = [4]int{1, 1, 1, 1}
         .          .     28:   }
         .          .     29:   array[0] = 1
         .          .     30:}

We can see that assignments takes some time.

To learn why we need to see the assembler code.

$go tool pprof -disasm 'BenchmarkMake' cpu.prof

     .          .     4eda93: MOVQ AX, 0(SP)                             ;alloc_test.go:8
  30ms       30ms     4eda97: MOVQ $0x4, 0x8(SP)                         ;test.BenchmarkMake alloc_test.go:8
     .          .     4edaa0: MOVQ $0x4, 0x10(SP)                       ;alloc_test.go:8
  10ms      1.34s     4edaa9: CALL runtime.makeslice(SB)                 ;test.BenchmarkMake alloc_test.go:8
     .          .     4edaae: MOVQ 0x18(SP), AX                       ;alloc_test.go:8
  10ms       10ms     4edab3: MOVQ 0x20(SP), CX                       ;test.BenchmarkMake alloc_test.go:8
     .          .     4edab8: TESTQ CX, CX                             ;alloc_test.go:9
     .          .     4edabb: JBE 0x4edb0b
     .          .     4edabd: MOVQ $0x1, 0(AX)
 130ms      130ms     4edac4: CMPQ $0x1, CX                           ;test.BenchmarkMake alloc_test.go:10
     .          .     4edac8: JBE 0x4edb04                             ;alloc_test.go:10
     .          .     4edaca: MOVQ $0x1, 0x8(AX)
  20ms       20ms     4edad2: CMPQ $0x2, CX                           ;test.BenchmarkMake alloc_test.go:11
     .          .     4edad6: JBE 0x4edafd                             ;alloc_test.go:11
     .          .     4edad8: MOVQ $0x1, 0x10(AX)
     .          .     4edae0: CMPQ $0x3, CX                           ;alloc_test.go:12
     .          .     4edae4: JA 0x4eda65

We can see that the time is taken by CMPQ command that compares constant with CX register. The CX register is the value copied from stack after call to make. We can deduce that it must be the size of slice while AX holds the reference to an underlying array. You can also see that the first bound check was optimized.

Conclusions

  1. Allocations takes the same time but the assignments costs extra due to the slice size checks (as noticed by Terry Pang).
  2. Using array instead of slice is much more cheaper as it saves allocations.

Why is using array so much cheaper?

In Go the array is basically a chunk of memory of fixed size. The [1]int is basically the same thing as int. You can find more in in Go Slices: usage and internals article.

9
  • How would you explain 330ms 330ms 27: for i := 0; i < b.N; i++ { vs 10ms 10ms 18: for i := 0; i < b.N; i++ {? – zerkms Dec 1 '17 at 6:39
  • @zerkms The loop also takes some time to run but it is the same in every benchmark so we don't have to analyze it. We can just remove it from both sides of equation. – Grzegorz Żur Dec 2 '17 at 12:42
  • How would you explain that it is 33x times slower in the other case? How much trust can you put to a benchmark that has an identical statement that is run 33x times slower? If this unexplainable 33x times slowness does not void all the results - do you still think it's not simply a confirmation bias? – zerkms Dec 2 '17 at 19:29
  • @zerkms I think you mean the array asignment. The gain is due to lack of allocation. Look at the last column in the results. Avoiding allocation is a very common optimization. It saves time twice, on allocation and later at garbage collection. – Grzegorz Żur Dec 2 '17 at 19:38
  • I understand that. My point is: if you cannot explain one line in benchmark - does not it void the whole benchmark? If 2 benchmark results differ by 33x times in one statement, why do you think other measurements are comparable and trustworthy? That's the common problem with benchmarks: people only compare numbers that prove their assumptions. I don't say your answer is wrong, what I'm saying is: the approach is not scientific and trustworthy. – zerkms Dec 2 '17 at 20:17

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