1

I have following code:

object KafkaApi {

  private implicit val main: ExecutionContextExecutor = ExecutionContext.global
  private val workers = ExecutionContext.fromExecutor(Executors.newCachedThreadPool())

  def main(args: Array[String]) {

    foo.unsafeRunAsync(_ => ())
    //foo.unsafeRunSync()
    println("Hello")


  }

  def foo: IO[Unit] =
    for {
      _ <- IO {
        println(Thread.currentThread().getName)
      }
      _ <- IO.shift(workers)
      _ <- IO {
        println(Thread.currentThread().getName)
      }
      _ <- IO {
        println(Thread.currentThread().getName)
      }
      _ <- IO {
        println(Thread.currentThread().getName)
      }
      _ <- IO.shift(main)
      _ <- IO {
        println(Thread.currentThread().getName)
      }
      _ <- IO {
        println(Thread.currentThread().getName)
      }
      _ <- IO {
        println(Thread.currentThread().getName)
      }
    } yield ()
}

and the output is:

main
Hello
pool-1-thread-1
pool-1-thread-1
pool-1-thread-1
scala-execution-context-global-14
scala-execution-context-global-14
scala-execution-context-global-14

What is the difference between main and scala-execution-context-global-14?

If these two are different, how to get the main thread back?

4
  • 1
    There is no simple way to get back to the main thread in a code like you've written. So you probably should describe your actual problem why you need it. See also XY Problem
    – SergGr
    Nov 30 '17 at 17:03
  • I just wondering, but what is the difference between main and scala-execution-context-global-14? Nov 30 '17 at 20:47
  • 1
    Actually there are more different than similar. ExecutionContext.global is a defaultExecutionContext provided by the Scala standard library and it is actually backed by a thread pool. So "scala-execution-context-global-14" is a name of a random thread in that pool. The "main" thread on the other hand is just a single thread that is started by JVM and that runs the entry point of your application (i.e. the main method).
    – SergGr
    Nov 30 '17 at 21:24
  • Running the code above, why the application never get terminated? Until I am going to stop it. Nov 30 '17 at 21:30
4

Running the code above, why the application never get terminated?

This additional question is too big for a comment so here goes my answer.

The thing is that in JVM all Threads are divided into "normal" and "daemon" threads. The important thing here is that

The Java Virtual Machine exits when the only threads running are all daemon threads.

So if you have any running non-daemon Thread, JVM thinks your application is still working even if it actually does nothing (maybe it is just waiting for some input). The "main" thread is obviously a "normal" thread. Threads created by standard ExecutionContext.global are daemon and thus don't stop your app from quitting when the main thread finishes. Threads created by Java's Executors.newCachedThreadPool are non-daemon and thus keep the application alive. There are several possible solutions:

  1. Don't use other ExecutionContext except for the global i.e. don't use Executors.newCachedThreadPool at all. Depending on your case this might be or not be what you want.

  2. Explicitly shutdown your custom ExecutorService when all its job is done. Be careful here because shutdown doesn't wait for all active tasks to be finished. So the code should become something like

private val pool = Executors.newCachedThreadPool
implicit private val workers = ExecutionContext.fromExecutor(pool)

// do whatever you want with workers 


// optionally wait for all the work to be done

pool.shutdown()
  1. Use custom pool that creates daemon threads. For example you could do something like this:
val workers = ExecutionContext.fromExecutor(Executors.newCachedThreadPool(new ThreadFactory {
  private val defaultDelegate = Executors.defaultThreadFactory()

  override def newThread(r: Runnable): Thread = {
    val t = defaultDelegate.newThread(r)
    //let the default factory do all the job and just override daemon-flag 
    t.setDaemon(true)
    t
  }
}))

IMHO the main trade-off between #2 and #3 is convenience vs correctness. In #3 you don't have to think where all tasks are finished so it is safe to call shutdown which is convenient. The price is that if for some reason you misjudged and your "main" thread quits before all other tasks are finished, you will not know that anything went wrong because daemon threads will be just silently killed. If you go with #2 and do the same mistake either your app will continue to run if you din't call shutdown in that code path, or you will see some warning in the log that the pool was shutdown while there still were some tasks in progress. So if this is just a middle step in a long sequence of processing what for some reason requires custom thread pool I'd probably go with #3; but if this parallel execution is the main behavior I'd go with more explicit #2 way.

2
  • The option three, how many daemon is going to create? For example, I run an application on creates daemon threads, it will pick one free thread and when the application finshed, so the pool will be available again? Dec 1 '17 at 9:05
  • @zero_coding, 1)whether threads would be daemon or normal and 2)how many threads will be created are independent matters. The first one is controlled by the ThreadFactory. The second one - by the specific thread pool (ExecutorService) that you will use. If you want a finer control (e.g. over max number of threads), just create a pool using explicit constructor call to ThreadPoolExecutor. Note there are also other standard implementations of [ExecutorService] that might be better for some needs.
    – SergGr
    Dec 1 '17 at 15:37

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