9

So I've got a String and I want to create a Double object with the String as a value.

I can call

Double myDouble = new Double (myString);

or I can call

Double myDouble = Double.valueOf(myString);

Is there a difference? I'm guessing the first guarantees a new object is created on the heap and the second might re-use an existing object.

For extra credit: the string might be null, in which case I want the Double to be null, but both the above throw a NullPointerException. Is there a way of writing

Double myDouble = myString == null ? null : Double.valueOf(myString);

in less code?

  • 3
    How do you want to give extra credits?? You're limited to one upvote to each answer ;-) – Andreas_D Jan 21 '11 at 11:06
  • 1
    I'm guessing the first guarantees a new object is created on the heap and the second might re-use an existing object. you're guessing correctly :-) – Sean Patrick Floyd Jan 21 '11 at 11:08
  • 2
    @Andreas_D - I was thinking maybe USD 1,000,000 paid into someone's PayPal account, but you're right: Stack Overflow rep is far more valuable, so I withdraw that offer ;-] – Rob Gilliam Jan 21 '11 at 11:39
  • 1
    From Java 9 onward, new Double(String) and other similar constuctor calls are deprecated because valueOf (or methods like parseDouble for making primitives) are "likely to yield significantly better space and time performance" in the newer JDK implementations. – Joshua Goldberg Dec 4 '18 at 23:00
3

Depends on the implementation. openJDK 6 b14 uses this implementation of Double(String s):

this(valueOf(s).doubleValue());

So it calls valueOf(String s) internally and must be less efficient compared to calling that method directly.

  • 2
    Accepting this answer because it starts with the phrase "Depends on the implementation", which it seems from the other answers is actually the case. – Rob Gilliam Jan 21 '11 at 11:39
3

Your assumption is right. The second way of getting a Double out of String can be faster because the value may be returned from a cache.

Regarding the second question, you may create a helper null safe method which would return a null instead of throwing NullPointerException.

  • Upvoted for answering the bonus credit question ;-) – Rob Gilliam Jan 21 '11 at 11:44
3

from apache

public static Double valueOf(String string) throws NumberFormatException {
          return new Double(parseDouble(string));
}

&

public Double(String string) throws NumberFormatException {
          this(parseDouble(string));
}

from sun[oracle ] jdk

 public Double(String s) throws NumberFormatException {
    // REMIND: this is inefficient
    this(valueOf(s).doubleValue());
    }

&

public static Double valueOf(double d) {
        return new Double(d);
    }
  • Is this actual source code from a particular JVM implementation? Might help to identify which one. – Rob Gilliam Jan 21 '11 at 11:42
2

No difference whatsoever, at least in Oracle JDK 1.6:

public Double(String s) throws NumberFormatException {
// REMIND: this is inefficient
this(valueOf(s).doubleValue());
}
  • 1
    The difference is in the comment. valueOf() creates one Double object, new Double() creates two. – Peter Lawrey Jan 21 '11 at 11:25
0

If you are concerned about performance you should consider using a primitive.

double myDouble = Double.parseDouble(myString);
  • Makes it harder to pass the all-important null values around, though. (Please don't suggest passing NaNs!) – Rob Gilliam Jan 21 '11 at 11:32
0

this will either return a valid Double, or null otherwise.

Double myDouble = null;
try {
    myDouble = Double.valueOf(myString);
}
catch (Exception e) { }

it handles even when myString is null

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