8

I have a time-series with uniform samples save to a numpy array and I'd like to plot their mean value with a bootstrapped confidence interval. Typically, I've used tsplot from Seaborn to accomplish this. However, this is now being deprecated. What am I supposed to use a replacement?

Here is an example usage below adapted from the Seaborn documentation:

x = np.linspace(0, 15, 31)
data = np.sin(x) + np.random.rand(10, 31) + np.random.randn(10, 1)
sns.tsplot(data)

Note: this is similar to questions "Seaborn tsplot error" and "Multi-line chart with seaborn tsplot". However, in my case, I actually need the confidence interval functionality of Seaborn and thus cannot simply use Matplotlib without some awkward coding.

  • This is one of those things where you wonder why the hell it's being deprecated – Brad Solomon Nov 30 '17 at 20:35
  • 1
    @BradSolomon because it's an awkward interface for plotting Pandas time-series data and has caused much confusion in the past – Seanny123 Nov 30 '17 at 20:49
  • Indeed, I think the number of people trying to use tsplot and ending up totally confused is much higher than the number of people actually using it. – ImportanceOfBeingErnest Nov 30 '17 at 20:56
  • 1
    I use tsplot regularly... I sure hope they replace it rather than just nuking it. Maybe they can hide it from people and leave it there... – foobarbecue Jan 5 '18 at 1:30
11

The example tsplot from the question can easily be replicated using matplotlib.

Using standard deviation as error estimate

import numpy as np; np.random.seed(1)
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import seaborn as sns

x = np.linspace(0, 15, 31)
data = np.sin(x) + np.random.rand(10, 31) + np.random.randn(10, 1)


fig, (ax,ax2) = plt.subplots(ncols=2, sharey=True)
ax = sns.tsplot(data=data,ax=ax, ci="sd")

def tsplot(ax, data,**kw):
    x = np.arange(data.shape[1])
    est = np.mean(data, axis=0)
    sd = np.std(data, axis=0)
    cis = (est - sd, est + sd)
    ax.fill_between(x,cis[0],cis[1],alpha=0.2, **kw)
    ax.plot(x,est,**kw)
    ax.margins(x=0)

tsplot(ax2, data)

ax.set_title("sns.tsplot")
ax2.set_title("custom tsplot")

plt.show()

enter image description here

Using bootstrapping for error estimate

import numpy as np; np.random.seed(1)
from scipy import stats
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import seaborn as sns

x = np.linspace(0, 15, 31)
data = np.sin(x) + np.random.rand(10, 31) + np.random.randn(10, 1)


fig, (ax,ax2) = plt.subplots(ncols=2, sharey=True)
ax = sns.tsplot(data=data,ax=ax)

def bootstrap(data, n_boot=10000, ci=68):
    boot_dist = []
    for i in range(int(n_boot)):
        resampler = np.random.randint(0, data.shape[0], data.shape[0])
        sample = data.take(resampler, axis=0)
        boot_dist.append(np.mean(sample, axis=0))
    b = np.array(boot_dist)
    s1 = np.apply_along_axis(stats.scoreatpercentile, 0, b, 50.-ci/2.)
    s2 = np.apply_along_axis(stats.scoreatpercentile, 0, b, 50.+ci/2.)
    return (s1,s2)

def tsplotboot(ax, data,**kw):
    x = np.arange(data.shape[1])
    est = np.mean(data, axis=0)
    cis = bootstrap(data)
    ax.fill_between(x,cis[0],cis[1],alpha=0.2, **kw)
    ax.plot(x,est,**kw)
    ax.margins(x=0)

tsplotboot(ax2, data)

ax.set_title("sns.tsplot")
ax2.set_title("custom tsplot")

plt.show()

enter image description here


I guess the reason this is deprecated is exactly that the use of this function is rather limited and in most cases you are better off just plotting the data you want to plot directly.

6

The replacement for tsplot called lineplot was introduced in version 0.9.0. It doesn't support Numpy-like "wide-form" data, thus the data has to be transformed using Pandas.

x = np.linspace(0, 15, 31)
data = np.sin(x) + np.random.rand(10, 31) + np.random.randn(10, 1)
df = pd.DataFrame(data).melt()
sns.lineplot(x="variable", y="value", data=df)

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