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I'm trying to wrap my head around futures in Rust but I am confused by this code which is supposed to send messages arriving at rx to sink:

extern crate futures;
extern crate tokio_core;
extern crate websocket;

use websocket::message::OwnedMessage;
use websocket::server::InvalidConnection;
use websocket::async::Server;

use tokio_core::reactor::Core;
use futures::{Future, Sink, Stream};
use futures::sync::mpsc;
use std::{thread, time};
use futures::sync::mpsc::Receiver;

fn main() {
    let mut core = Core::new().unwrap();
    let (mut tx, rx) = mpsc::channel(5);
    thread::spawn(|| worker(rx));
    let mut i = 0;
    loop {
        let res = tx.clone().send(OwnedMessage::Text(format!("Test {}", i)));
        core.run(res);
        i += 1;
        let period = time::Duration::from_millis(200);
        thread::sleep(period);
    }
}

fn worker(rx: Receiver<OwnedMessage>) {
    let mut core = Core::new().unwrap();
    let handle = core.handle();
    // bind to the server
    let server = Server::bind("127.0.0.1:9000", &handle).unwrap();
    let f = server.incoming()
            // we don't wanna save the stream if it drops
            .map_err(|InvalidConnection { error, .. }| error)
            .for_each(|(upgrade, addr)| {
                // accept the request to be a ws connection if it does
                let f = upgrade
                    .use_protocol("rust-websocket")
                    .accept()
                    .and_then(|(s, _)| {
                        let (sink, stream) = s.split();
                        rx // using stream (echoing back) works
                            .forward(sink)
                            .map_err(|error| {
                                error
                            })
                            .and_then(|(a, sink)| {
                                sink.send(OwnedMessage::Close(None))
                            })
                    });

                handle.spawn(f.map_err(move |e| println!("Err"))
                    .map(move |_| println!("Done")));
                Ok(())
            });
    core.run(f).expect("somerror");
}

As noted in the comment, using stream as input works fine. When using rx, the compiler complains about a type mismatch regarding the error types (I believe):

error[E0271]: type mismatch resolving `<futures::stream::SplitSink<websocket::client::async::Framed<tokio_core::net::TcpStream, websocket::async::MessageCodec<websocket::OwnedMessage>>> as futures::Sink>::SinkError == ()`
  --> src/main.rs:47:26
   |
47 |                         .forward(sink)
   |                          ^^^^^^^ expected enum `websocket::WebSocketError`, found ()
   |
   = note: expected type `websocket::WebSocketError`
              found type `()`

error[E0599]: no method named `map_err` found for type `futures::stream::Forward<futures::sync::mpsc::Receiver<websocket::OwnedMessage>, futures::stream::SplitSink<websocket::client::async::Framed<tokio_core::net::TcpStream, websocket::async::MessageCodec<websocket::OwnedMessage>>>>` in the current scope
  --> src/main.rs:48:26
   |
48 |                         .map_err(|error| {
   |                          ^^^^^^^
   |
   = note: the method `map_err` exists but the following trait bounds were not satisfied:
           `futures::stream::Forward<futures::sync::mpsc::Receiver<websocket::OwnedMessage>, futures::stream::SplitSink<websocket::client::async::Framed<tokio_core::net::TcpStream, websocket::async::MessageCodec<websocket::OwnedMessage>>>> : futures::Future`

These are my dependencies:

[dependencies]
websocket = "0.20.0"
futures = "0.1"
tokio-core = "0.1"

What am I missing here?

7
error[E0271]: type mismatch resolving
  `<futures::stream::SplitSink<
        websocket::client::async::Framed<
            tokio_core::net::TcpStream,
            websocket::async::MessageCodec<websocket::OwnedMessage>>>
   as futures::Sink>::SinkError == ()`

We have two types here: <futures::stream::SplitSink<...> as futures::Sink>::SinkError and (). Where do these two types come from? Also, the first one is an unresolved associated type; perhaps we could resolve it to get some more insight? Let's trace it step by step.

First, we need to figure out why the compiler is trying to match these two types in the first place. If we look at the signature for forward, we'll see the constraint Self::Error: From<S::SinkError>. Self is the type of the stream we're calling forward on, while S is the type of the sink that's passed as an argument to forward.

We're calling forward on rx, whose type is futures::sync::mpsc::Receiver. On the documentation page for Receiver, we can see the following:

impl<T> Stream for Receiver<T>
  type Item = T
  type Error = ()

This shows us where the () came from. Let's look at the sink argument now.

The type of sink is futures::stream::SplitSink<websocket::client::async::Framed<tokio_core::net::TcpStream, websocket::async::MessageCodec<websocket::OwnedMessage>>> (we know this from the error message; the RLS also confirms this). On the documentation page for SplitSink, we have:

impl<S: Sink> Sink for SplitSink<S>
  type SinkItem = S::SinkItem
  type SinkError = S::SinkError

So SplitSink's SinkError is the same as its inner sink's SinkError. The inner sink's type is websocket::client::async::Framed<tokio_core::net::TcpStream, websocket::async::MessageCodec<websocket::OwnedMessage>>. What does the documentation for Framed say?

impl<T, U> Sink for Framed<T, U>
where
    T: AsyncWrite,
    U: Encoder,
    <U as Encoder>::Error: From<Error>,
  type SinkItem = <U as Encoder>::Item
  type SinkError = <U as Encoder>::Error

Framed has two type parameters, but we only need to look at the second one, which is websocket::async::MessageCodec<websocket::OwnedMessage> here, to determine the SinkError type. Let's take a look at MessageCodec now. (Note: websocket::codec::ws::MessageCodec is reexported as websocket::async::MessageCodec.)

impl<M> Decoder for MessageCodec<M>
where
    M: MessageTrait,
  type Item = OwnedMessage
  type Error = WebSocketError

Ah ha! The sink produces errors of type WebSocketError.


Now that we've figured out the types, let's go back to why we cared about the types in the first place. We were trying to understand why the constraint Self::Error: From<S::SinkError> wasn't met on the call to forward. We now know that the compiler is trying to resolve (): From<WebSocketError>. It looks like there's no impl From<WebSocketError> for (). Let's verify this:

extern crate websocket;

fn main() {
    let a = websocket::result::WebSocketError::NoDataAvailable;
    let () = From::from(a);
}

Indeed, this fails to compile:

error[E0277]: the trait bound `(): std::convert::From<websocket::WebSocketError>` is not satisfied
 --> src/main.rs:5:14
  |
5 |     let () = From::from(a);
  |              ^^^^^^^^^^ the trait `std::convert::From<websocket::WebSocketError>` is not implemented for `()`
  |
  = note: required by `std::convert::From::from`

We can work around the missing implementation by using sink_map_err to change sink's error type.

let (sink, stream) = s.split();
let sink = sink.sink_map_err(|_| ()); // <<<<<
rx
    .forward(sink)
    .and_then(|(a, sink)| {
        sink.send(OwnedMessage::Close(None))
    })

This solves the call to forward, but now the result of this closure doesn't compose with upgrade.use_protocol("rust-websocket").accept(), which still has WebSocketError as its error type. It makes more sense to change rx's error type instead. But how do we construct a WebSocketError from a (), which carries no information?

You might be wondering, why does Receiver use () for its error type? If we look at the source code, we can see that in fact, poll never returns an error. I think it would be more appropriate if the error type was ! (the never type) or some other void type, to clearly indicate that errors are impossible; there's an issue open on futures requesting this change for futures 0.2.

Since errors are impossible, we don't need to construct a WebSocketError; we can just diverge instead, for example by panicking.

fn worker(rx: Receiver<OwnedMessage>) {
    let rx = rx.map_err(|()| panic!("Receiver should never fail!"));
    let mut core = Core::new().unwrap();
    let handle = core.handle();
    // bind to the server
    let server = Server::bind("127.0.0.1:9000", &handle).unwrap();
    let f = server.incoming()
            // we don't wanna save the stream if it drops
            .map_err(|InvalidConnection { error, .. }| error)
            .for_each(|(upgrade, addr)| {
                // accept the request to be a ws connection if it does
                let f = upgrade
                    .use_protocol("rust-websocket")
                    .accept()
                    .and_then(|(s, _)| {
                        let (sink, stream) = s.split();
                        rx
                            .forward(sink)
                            .and_then(|(a, sink)| {
                                sink.send(OwnedMessage::Close(None))
                            })
                    });

                handle.spawn(f.map_err(move |e| println!("Err"))
                    .map(move |_| println!("Done")));
                Ok(())
            });
    core.run(f).expect("somerror");
}

Now, there's still an error:

error[E0507]: cannot move out of captured outer variable in an `FnMut` closure
  --> src/main.rs:43:31
   |
30 |     let rx = rx.map_err(|()| panic!("Receiver should never fail!"));
   |         -- captured outer variable
...
43 |                     .and_then(|(s, _)| {
   |                               ^^^^^^^^ cannot move out of captured outer variable in an `FnMut` closure

Why is the closure trying to move rx? Because forward takes self by value. Why is the closure an FnMut? Watch out, Future::and_then requires an FnOnce (it's valid to move a value from a captured variable into an FnOnce closure), but Stream::for_each requires an FnMut. This makes sense: for_each will invoke the closure once for each incoming connection!

The channels you're using are multi-producer, single-consumer (hence the name mpsc), but you're trying to have multiple consumers here (each connection is trying to read from the receiver). I'll leave it to you to fix this design issue in your program. Remember that there can be multiple concurrent client connections!

  • 1
    Thank you for the great, in-depth answer. This was indeed an design flaw, thank you for pointing this out. I solved it by creating a channel per connection and storing the senders in a map, so that the main thread can send to every connection. – trimoq Dec 2 '17 at 16:00

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