406

How can I find the number of cores available to my application from within Java code?

  • 3
    For pretty much all intents and purpose "core == processor". – Joachim Sauer Jan 21 '11 at 13:59
  • 32
    finding the number of cores the machine has physically is hard using purely Java. Finding the number of cores the Java program can use at startup is easy, using Runtime.getRuntime().availableProcessors(). Due to the ability of all major modern OSes to set CPU affinity (i.e. restrict an application to only a certain number of cores) this is a concern to keep in mind. – SyntaxT3rr0r Jan 21 '11 at 16:15
  • 6
    Logical or physical cores? There's an important difference. – b1nary.atr0phy Jul 29 '15 at 3:55
707
int cores = Runtime.getRuntime().availableProcessors();

If cores is less than one, either your processor is about to die, or your JVM has a serious bug in it, or the universe is about to blow up.

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  • 101
    This will give you the number of logical threads. e.g. If you have hyper-threading on, this will be double the number of cores. – Peter Lawrey Jan 21 '11 at 14:29
  • 5
    @Peter, yeah, good point. I felt myself King of the Hill when performing this action with my i7 machine! :) – Bart Kiers Jan 21 '11 at 14:39
  • 14
    @Peter Lawrey: it only gives the number of logical threads actually available to the JVM (at startup I guess). Using CPU affinity the user/OS can restrict the number of "cores" a JVM sees. You can even do it on a running JVM but I'm not too sure how this influence availableProcessors(). – SyntaxT3rr0r Jan 21 '11 at 16:17
  • 25
    @PeterLawrey: that seems to be incorrect, the Java documentation for availableProcessors() says "This value may change during a particular invocation of the virtual machine. Applications that are sensitive to the number of available processors should therefore occasionally poll this property and adjust their resource usage appropriately." source – JW. Jun 16 '12 at 9:38
  • 9
    @universe blowing up and such : or the machine actually has more than 2,147,483,647 logical threads available ? ;) – Pierre Henry Oct 22 '12 at 13:08
26

If you want to get number of physical cores you can run cmd and terminal command and then to parse the output to get info you need.Below is shown function that returns number of physical cores .

private int getNumberOfCPUCores() {
    OSValidator osValidator = new OSValidator();
    String command = "";
    if(osValidator.isMac()){
        command = "sysctl -n machdep.cpu.core_count";
    }else if(osValidator.isUnix()){
        command = "lscpu";
    }else if(osValidator.isWindows()){
        command = "cmd /C WMIC CPU Get /Format:List";
    }
    Process process = null;
    int numberOfCores = 0;
    int sockets = 0;
    try {
        if(osValidator.isMac()){
            String[] cmd = { "/bin/sh", "-c", command};
            process = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(cmd);
        }else{
            process = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(command);
        }
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

    BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(
            new InputStreamReader(process.getInputStream()));
    String line;

    try {
        while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null) {
            if(osValidator.isMac()){
                numberOfCores = line.length() > 0 ? Integer.parseInt(line) : 0;
            }else if (osValidator.isUnix()) {
                if (line.contains("Core(s) per socket:")) {
                    numberOfCores = Integer.parseInt(line.split("\\s+")[line.split("\\s+").length - 1]);
                }
                if(line.contains("Socket(s):")){
                    sockets = Integer.parseInt(line.split("\\s+")[line.split("\\s+").length - 1]);
                }
            } else if (osValidator.isWindows()) {
                if (line.contains("NumberOfCores")) {
                    numberOfCores = Integer.parseInt(line.split("=")[1]);
                }
            }
        }
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    if(osValidator.isUnix()){
        return numberOfCores * sockets;
    }
    return numberOfCores;
}

OSValidator class:

public class OSValidator {

private static String OS = System.getProperty("os.name").toLowerCase();

public static void main(String[] args) {

    System.out.println(OS);

    if (isWindows()) {
        System.out.println("This is Windows");
    } else if (isMac()) {
        System.out.println("This is Mac");
    } else if (isUnix()) {
        System.out.println("This is Unix or Linux");
    } else if (isSolaris()) {
        System.out.println("This is Solaris");
    } else {
        System.out.println("Your OS is not support!!");
    }
}

public static boolean isWindows() {
    return (OS.indexOf("win") >= 0);
}

public static boolean isMac() {
    return (OS.indexOf("mac") >= 0);
}

public static boolean isUnix() {
    return (OS.indexOf("nix") >= 0 || OS.indexOf("nux") >= 0 || OS.indexOf("aix") > 0 );
}

public static boolean isSolaris() {
    return (OS.indexOf("sunos") >= 0);
}
public static String getOS(){
    if (isWindows()) {
        return "win";
    } else if (isMac()) {
        return "osx";
    } else if (isUnix()) {
        return "uni";
    } else if (isSolaris()) {
        return "sol";
    } else {
        return "err";
    }
}

}

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  • 4
    This is a piece of code that is a good candidate to be OOPed. :) – Lyubomyr Shaydariv Dec 30 '15 at 8:45
  • 1
    The OSValidator class supports OSX, but the getNumberOfCores completely ignores it. As an aside, blog.opengroup.org/2015/10/02/… so 'Mac' should be in your isUnix() but... For BSD, OSX, no lscpu command exists and your getNumberOfCores will return 0. – Paul Hargreaves Apr 19 '16 at 19:16
  • 1
    On Linux, you have to multiple "Core(s) per socket" by "Socket(s)". Also, I would use regular expressions. – Aleksandr Dubinsky Jun 7 '16 at 16:47
  • 1
    Its better to use "OS.contains()" instead of "OS.indexOf()". It improves readability and is less to type. – Josh Gager Feb 5 '17 at 3:11
6

This is an additional way to find out the number of CPU cores (and a lot of other information), but this code requires an additional dependence:

Native Operating System and Hardware Information https://github.com/oshi/oshi

SystemInfo systemInfo = new SystemInfo();
HardwareAbstractionLayer hardwareAbstractionLayer = systemInfo.getHardware();
CentralProcessor centralProcessor = hardwareAbstractionLayer.getProcessor();

Get the number of logical CPUs available for processing:

centralProcessor.getLogicalProcessorCount();
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  • This will also let you use centralProcessor.getPhysicalProcessorCount(), which is probably currently the best way in java to obtain that information. If you have threads which almost constantly have work to do, and you want to know the number of such threads you can start while still leaving a well-defined leftover of CPU capacity for other threads and processes, this is the number the calculation should be based on. – malamut Nov 28 '19 at 9:09
-3

This works on Windows with Cygwin installed:

System.getenv("NUMBER_OF_PROCESSORS")

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  • I have Cygwin installed, but this works from the Windows shell: groovy -e "println System.getenv('NUMBER_OF_PROCESSORS')" – AbuNassar Apr 1 '17 at 14:23
  • I don't know off the top of my head if this is a standard Windows environment variable, but: set NUMBER_OF_PROCESSORS works from the Windows command line for me. – AbuNassar Apr 1 '17 at 14:25

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