62

I was doing some coding challenges and encountered something I am not too familiar with. I am more curious to learn what it is and why it is there.

The prompt is pretty straightforward:

Given a 32-bit signed integer, reverse digits of an integer.

Example:
Input: -123
Output: -321

Example:    
Input: 120
Output: 21

Assume we are dealing with an environment which could only hold integers within the 32-bit signed integer range. For the purpose of this problem, assume that your function returns 0 when the reversed integer overflows.

I came up with this.

var reverse = function(x) {
    var isNegative = false;
    if(x < 0){
        isNegative = true;
        x *= -1;
    };
    var reverseX = parseInt(String(x).split('').reverse((a,b) => a - b).join(''));
    if(reverseX > Math.pow(2,32)){
      return 0;
    }
    if(isNegative){
        return -1 * reverseX
    } else {
        return reverseX;
    }
};

However, I am stumped with some of the failing tests:

Input:
1563847412
Output:
2147483651
Expected: 0

To my understanding, 32 bit integer is 2^32. What is its significance in JS and what happen if I started going over? (2^32 + 1)

My second question, if I may ask two, is I "anticipated" if value of reverseX exceeds 2^32, but it is still failing the test.

if (reverseX > Math.pow(2, 32)) {
  return 0;
}

How can I appropriately return 0 when I exceeded 32-bit integer?

3
  • 2
    integer overflow: xkcd.com/571
    – Thomas
    Commented Dec 1, 2017 at 19:43
  • change Math.pow(2, 32) should be Math.pow(2, 31) -1 Commented Jul 17, 2021 at 11:32
  • Why do you pass an anonymus function to reverse method?
    – Adam
    Commented Jun 26, 2022 at 20:43

20 Answers 20

99

The upper bound of a signed integer is not 232 - 1, but 231 - 1, since the first bit is the sign bit.

If you make that comparison, you'll see your test gives the right result.

Be aware that JavaScript uses IEEE-754 floating point representation for numbers, even when they are integers. But the precision of floating point is more than enough to perform exact calculations on 32-bit integers. As you realised, you'll need to make the necessary test to detect 32-bit overflow.

Some notes about your code: it passes an argument to the Array#reverse method, which is a method that does not take an argument. Here is how I would write it -- see comments in code:

// Name argument n instead of x, as that latter is commonly used for decimal numbers 
function reverse(n) {
    // Array#reverse method takes no argument.
    // You can use `Math.abs()` instead of changing the sign if negative.
    // Conversion of string to number can be done with unary plus operator.
    var reverseN = +String(Math.abs(n)).split('').reverse().join('');
    // Use a number constant instead of calculating the power
    if (reverseN > 0x7FFFFFFF) {
        return 0;
    }
    // As we did not change the sign, you can do without the boolean isNegative.
    // Don't multiply with -1, just use the unary minus operator.
    // The ternary operator might interest you as well (you could even use it
    //    to combine the above return into one return statement)
    return n < 0 ? -reverseN : reverseN;
}

console.log(reverse(-123));
console.log(reverse(1563847412));

More efficient

Conversion to string, splitting and joining are relatively expensive operations in comparison with simple arithmetic operations. And so it will be more time (and memory) efficient to solve the problem like this:

function reverse(n) {
    var reverseN = 0;
    var sign = n < 0;
    n = Math.abs(n);
    while (n) {
        reverseN = reverseN*10 + (n % 10);
        n = Math.floor(n/10);
    }
    return reverseN > 0x7FFFFFFF ? 0 : sign ? -reverseN : reverseN;
}

console.log(reverse(-123));
console.log(reverse(1563847412));

8
  • 2
    Hats off to your answer: Runtime: 84 ms, faster than 83.91% of JavaScript online submissions for Reverse Integer. Memory Usage: 35.9 MB, less than 56.21% of JavaScript online submissions for Reverse Integer.
    – Viet
    Commented Mar 26, 2019 at 2:23
  • 1
    Thank you, @Viet! The answer was not really focussing on efficiency, just on fixing the issues that the OP had. Now that you mention space and time efficiency, I have added a more efficient variant to my answer.
    – trincot
    Commented Mar 26, 2019 at 6:17
  • 5
    Thank you! How did you find out, that 2^31 -1 is 0x7FFFFFFF?
    – vbarinov
    Commented Apr 4, 2019 at 6:40
  • 8
    @vbarinov, 2^31 in binary representation is a 1 followed by 31 zeroes (just like 10^6 in decimal is a 1 followed by 6 zeroes). Each group of 4 binary digits (starting from the right) is a hexadecimal digit, so 2^31 is 0x80000000. Then subtract one...
    – trincot
    Commented Apr 4, 2019 at 7:56
  • 6
    The OP never mentioned leetcode, nor this requirement. Anyway all requirements should be in the question. The OP cannot assume that we know they are working on a leetcode challenge, and that we should read offsite content to fully understand the question. We should only take into account the specifications present in the question, and the OP's particular problem.
    – trincot
    Commented Apr 22, 2020 at 10:55
11

var reverse = function(x) {
  let ans = parseInt(x.toString().split('').reverse().join('').toString());

  if (x < 0) { ans *= -1; }

  if (ans < (Math.pow(2, 31) * -1) || ans > Math.pow(2, 31) - 1) return 0;
  return ans;
};

console.log("Reverse of 123: " + reverse(123));
console.log("Reverse of -123: " + reverse(-123));

2
  • 6
    Adding a two-line description on what's happening where relevant to OP's question will give broader context to everyone who visits this answer later. Commented Oct 23, 2018 at 2:10
  • I would make the last two lines combined into one like so return (Math.abs(Math.pow(2, 31) - 1) < ans) ? 0 : ans
    – Miladinho
    Commented Jan 18, 2019 at 3:56
4

However, I am stumped with some of the failing tests:

Input:
1563847412
Output:
2147483651
Expected: 0

the max 32-bit integer I believe is (2^31) which is 2,147,483,647. This is so that negative values can be stored as well (-2^31) being the 32 bit limit (this is what "signed" means). So any number higher than that, you can return 0 for the sake of your program. If the prompt asked you for "unsigned", the range would be 0 to 2^32 as you initially assumed.

In terms of your failed test, 2147483651 is 4 greater than 2,147,483,647 so you should return 0. Instead you should say reverseX > Math.pow(2,31) - 1

What is its significance in JS and what happen if I started going over? (2^32 + 1)

Technicially in JS you aren't restricted by this number, JS uses significand double-precision floating point numbers. So the max value is actually (2^53) - 1

1
  • 1
    Strange that 2^31 should be odd. Commented Apr 30, 2020 at 19:46
3
var reverse = function(x) {
    var reverseX = parseInt(x.toString().split('').reverse().join(''));
    if (reverseX < (Math.pow(2, 31) * -1) || reverseX > Math.pow(2, 31) - 1) return 0;
    return reverseX* Math.sign(x);
    
};
  • First convert x into string and split it with '' so you will get array.

  • Later use reverse() function of array to reverse element of an array

  • After than join again using join('') function Now, Check If reversing reverseX causes the value to go outside the signed 32-bit integer range [-231, 231 - 1], then return 0.

    if (reverseX < (Math.pow(2, 31) * -1) || reverseX > Math.pow(2, 31) - 1) return 0;

1
  • Please don't post only code as answer, but also provide an explanation what your code does and how it solves the problem of the question. Answers with an explanation are usually more helpful and of better quality, and are more likely to attract upvotes.
    – Tyler2P
    Commented May 20, 2021 at 20:21
3

Unfortunately, all solutions posted so far (except, maybe this one) are incorrect! Including currently accepted solution. Here is why.

32-bit integer has range from -2147483648 (-2^31) to 2147483647 (2^31 − 1)

Therefore, if we pass into our reverse function

  • -8463847412 - we should get -2147483648 (which is still in the range), but in most solutions posted here, we get 0, which is wrong!
  • 8463847412 - we should get 0. Some solutions posted here fail this, instead showing 2147483648 which is above max 32-bit integer limit.

Here is my solution, maybe not most elegant, but for sure most accurate

// feel free to use exact values here to optimize performance
const minIntegerNumber = Math.pow(-2, 31) // -2147483648
const maxIntegerNumber = Math.pow(2, 31) - 1 // 2147483647

function reverse(x: number): number {
  const reversedCharacters = x.toString().split('').reverse().join('')
  if (x < 0) {
    const result = Number(`-${reversedCharacters.slice(0, reversedCharacters.length - 1)}`)
    return result < minIntegerNumber ? 0 : result
  } else {
    const result = Number(reversedCharacters)
    return result > maxIntegerNumber ? 0 : result
  }
}
1
  • Unfortunately, your boundary cases are already outside the 32-bit range. Given that "we are dealing with an environment which could only hold integers within the 32-bit signed integer range", this would never happen.
    – trincot
    Commented Sep 4, 2023 at 13:57
1

Here is my solution to that question. I wouldn't recommend the split().join() method as it greatly increases time and space complexity.

// 0(n)
var reverse = function(x) {
  var reverse = 0
  var isNegative = x < 0 ? -1 : 1
  x = x * isNegative

  // capture single digits
  if (x / 10 < 1) {
    return x
  }

  // reverse
  while (x >= 1) {
    var diff = parseInt(x % 10)
    reverse = (reverse * 10) + diff
    x = x / 10
  }

  // capture greater than 32bit
  if (reverse > Math.pow(2,31)-1) {
    return 0;
  }

  // capture negative
  return reverse * isNegative
};
1

Here is my solution

 var reverse = function(x) {


    rev_string = x.toString()
    strArray = rev_string.split("")
    revArray = strArray.reverse()
    new_str =  revArray.join("")

    if (parseInt(new_str) < (Math.pow(2, 31) * -1) || parseInt(new_str) > Math.pow(2,31) - 1) {
         new_str = 0;
    }
    if (Math.sign(x) === -1) {
    
       new_str = parseInt(new_str) * Math.sign(x);
    }


  return new_str;
  };
1

I came with this. Not as good as some of the other answers but it works.

    function reverse(x) {
        if(x>0){
            x=x.toString();
            var v=1;    
        }
        else{
            x= -1*x;
            x= x.toString();
            var v=-1;
        }
        var newArr = [];
        for(var i=x.length-1;i>=0;i--){
            var index = x.length-1-i;
            newArr[index]=x[i];
        }
        var result = parseInt(newArr.join('')*v);
        if(result <=2147483647 && result >= -2147483647){
            return result
        }
        else{
            return 0
        }
    };
0
function reverse(x) {
    let strArr = x.toString().split('');
    let initialString = '';
    for (let i = strArr.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        initialString += strArr[i];
    }
    if (parseInt(initialString) > Math.pow(2, 31) - 1 || parseInt(initialString) < Math.pow(-2, 31)) {
        return 0;
    } else if (x < 0) {
        return -parseInt(initialString);
    } else {
        return parseInt(initialString);
    }
}
0
var reverse = function(x) {
     let reversed = parseInt(Array.from(`${Math.sign(x) * x}`).reverse().join(''));
     return Math.sign(x)*(reversed > 0x7FFFFFFF?0:reversed);
    
};

Runtime: 96 ms, faster than 73.30% of JavaScript online submissions for Reverse Integer. Memory Usage: 40.4 MB, less than 38.77% of JavaScript online submissions for Reverse Integer.

Not the most optimal space and time complexity though.

0

It's late but still want to give the answer.

   var reverse = function(x) {
   let rev =  parseInt(x.toString().split('').reverse().join(''));

    if(rev > Math.pow(2, 31)){
     return 0;
    }
     else{        
      return rev*Math.sign(x);
    }    
   }

Runtime: 88 ms, faster than 95.55% of JavaScript online submissions for Reverse Integer. Memory Usage: 40 MB, less than 88.15% of JavaScript online submissions for Reverse Integer.

0

I had tried this solution. It has Runtime: 84 ms, faster than 98.31% of JavaScript online submissions for Reverse Integer. on Leetcode.

var reverse = function(x) {
let minus = false;
    x < 0 ? minus=true : minus=false;
    let reverse = parseInt(x.toString().split("").reverse().join(''));
    if (reverse > Math.pow(2,31) - 1) {
        return 0;
    }
    if(minus){
      return parseInt(`-${reverse}`)
    }
    return reverse
};
0

Here's how I'd do it.

var reverse = function(x) {
    let negative = x < 0;
    x = parseInt(String(Math.abs(x)).split("").reverse().join(""));
    return x > 0x7FFFFFFF ? 0 : negative ? -x : x;
};
0

Two-liner shorthand

var reverse = function(x) {
    let remainder = parseFloat(x.toString().split("").reverse().join(""));
    return (remainder >= 2147483647 || remainder <= -2147483648) ? 0 : remainder * Math.sign(x);
};
0

Pretty easy solution with JS Destructuring

const reverse = (x) => {
    if (x < 10 && x > -10) {
        return x
    }
    if (x >= 0) {
        const rev = +([...`${x}`].reverse().join(''))
        return rev > 0x7FFFFFFF ? 0 : rev
    }
    const rev = +([...`${-x}`].reverse().join(''))
    return rev > 0x7FFFFFFF ? 0 : -rev
};

It can be written shorter, but this solution has:

Runtime: 72 ms, faster than 96.87% of JavaScript online submissions for Reverse Integer. Memory Usage: 43.3 MB, less than 94.52% of JavaScript online submissions for Reverse Integer.

P.S. Thank @trincot for 0x7FFFFFFF

0
var reverse = function(x) {
    const minIntegerNumber = Math.pow(-2, 31) // -2147483648
const maxIntegerNumber = Math.pow(2, 31) - 1 // 2147483647
  const reversed = x.toString().split('').reverse().join('');
  const res = parseInt(reversed) * Math.sign(x)
  console.log(reversed)
   if (res <minIntegerNumber ) {
        return 0;
    }
    else if(res >maxIntegerNumber){
        return 0;
    }
  return res;
  
};
-1

This works well

var reverse = function(x) {
        let num = Math.abs(x);
        let result = 0;
        let rem;
        while(num>0){
            rem = num % 10;
            result = result * 10 + rem;
            num = Math.floor(num/10);
        }
        if(0x7FFFFFFF < result) return 0
        if(x < 0) return result * -1;
        return result;
    };
-1
const reverse = x => {
    let possible = x.toString().split('').reverse();
    let temp, sign, overflow;
    if(Number.isNaN(parseInt(possible[possible.length -1]))) {
      sign = possible.pop();
    }   
    temp = parseInt(possible.join(''));
    overflow = temp > 2**31-1;
    if(sign) {
        if(!overflow) {
            return temp*-1;
        }
    } else {
        if(!overflow){
           return temp;   
        }    
    }
    return 0;
};
-1
var reverse = function(x) {
    let isNegative = x < 0 ? -1 : 1    
    x = x * isNegative
    const split = `${x}`.split(``)
    if(split && split.length){
        let reversedInteger = ``
        for(let i=1;i<= split.length;i++) {
             reversedInteger = reversedInteger + split[(split.length)-i]
        }
         if (reversedInteger > Math.pow(2,31)-1) {
             return 0;
         }
        return parseInt(reversedInteger*isNegative)
    }
};

Runtime: 72 ms, faster than 82.67% of JavaScript online submissions for Reverse Integer. Memory Usage: 36 MB, less than 28.12% of JavaScript online submissions for Reverse Integer.

-1
let output = 0;
// convert input into its absolute value to make it easier for //calculation
let input = Math.abs(x)

// some math calucation to get last digits of input so that can be //used to reverse a string
while (input > 0) {
  output = (output * 10) + input % 10
  input = Math.floor(input / 10)
}
if (output > Math.pow(2,31)) {
  return 0;
}
// this to check if we need to add '-' to output
if (x < 0) {
  return output * -1
}

return output;
1
  • Your answer could be improved by adding more information on what the code does and how it helps the OP.
    – Tyler2P
    Commented Jul 14, 2022 at 19:42

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