3

I do apologize in advance if my question looks really dumb, but for some reason I can't look through more graceful solution to the problem. So I have a method that utilizes switch - case blocks similar to the below chunk of code:

public enum Items
{
    item_1, item_2, item_3, .... item_N
};

private string String_1 {get; set;}
private string String_2 {get; set;}
private string String_3 {get; set;}
// ...
private string String_N {get; set;}

public void DoSomething(Items item){
    switch(item){
        case item_1:
            MethodNumberOne();
            MethodNumberTwo();
            MethodNumberThree();
            Console.WriteLine($"{0} is displayed on the page", String_1);
            break;

        case item_2:
            MethodNumberOne();
            MethodNumberTwo();
            MethodNumberThree();
            Console.WriteLine($"{0} is displayed on the page", String_2);
            break;

        case item_3:
            MethodNumberOne();
            MethodNumberTwo();
            MethodNumberThree();
            Console.WriteLine($"{0} is displayed on the page", String_3);
            break;
        // ...
        case item_N:
            MethodNumberOne();
            MethodNumberTwo();
            MethodNumberThree();
            Console.WriteLine($"{0} is displayed on the page", String_N);

As it can be seen from the above example switch statement is calling the same methods, and the only difference is the last Console call.

My question: is there a more elegant way to handle this situation as I don't really like the duplication of the code. So far I tried to carry out Items enum to separate class and pass this as parameter, but this approach doesn't work as static class can't be passed as parameter in C#

public static class Items {
    public string String_1 {get; set;}
    public string String_2 {get; set;}
    public string String_3 {get; set;}
    // ...
    private string String_N {get; set;}
}

// ....

public void DoSomething(Items item)
  • not allowing to declare this method

Any suggestions are greatly appreciated..

4
  • 2
    Can you use an array to hold your String_1, String_2, etc items (for example, called stringsArray[]) then you could access them like this stringsArray[item_1] Instead of Console.WriteLine($"{0} is displayed on the page", String_2); You'd have Console.WriteLine($"{0} is displayed on the page", stringsArray[item_2]); Nov 22 '17 at 22:19
  • 2
    Alternatively, consider a Dictionary<Items, string> Nov 22 '17 at 22:32
  • 2
    Before you go inside the switch block, call the three methods. Within the switch block, call console the way you are doing now. Thats pretty simple. Nov 22 '17 at 23:26
  • 2
7

You could store the enum Items to String_X mapping in a dictionary rather than relying on a switch.

private IDictionary<Items, string> _itemStringMap = new Dicitionary<Items, string>()
{
   { Items.item_1, String_1 },
   //Other items here
};

public void DoSomething(Items item)
{
  var s = _itemStringMap[item];

  MethodNumberOne();
  MethodNumberTwo();
  MethodNumberThree();
  Console.WriteLine($"{0} is displayed on the page", s);
}

You may want to check that the item argument has a valid mapping and if not use a default string.

1
4

The simplest way to clean this up is to introduce a variable.

public void DoSomething(Items item){

    string foo;
    switch(item){
        case item_1:
            foo = String_1;
            break;

        case item_2:
            foo = String_2;
            break;

        case item_3:
            foo = String_3;
            break;
        // ...
        case item_N:
            foo = String_N;
            break;
    }

    MethodNumberOne();
    MethodNumberTwo();
    MethodNumberThree();
    Console.WriteLine($"{0} is displayed on the page", foo);

}

This makes it clear that what we really have is a key/value pair though, so we can go farther and store the strings in a dictionary.

var dict = new Dictionary<Items,string>()
{
    { item_1, string_1 },
    { item_2, string_2 },
    //...
    { item_N, string_N }
}

MethodNumberOne();
MethodNumberTwo();
MethodNumberThree();
Console.WriteLine($"{0} is displayed on the page", dict[item]);

Of course, you'll want to make sure the key (item) is valid, error handling, and all that jazz.

2
  • Oh. If you use the dictionary, be sure to read up on it first. I showed an example using an indexer in my answer, but there are some subtleties to using the indexer. In real code, you're much more likely to use TryGetValue(item, out foo)
    – RubberDuck
    Nov 22 '17 at 22:41
  • I don't understand the downvotes. I provided at least as good of an answer as the accepted one, before it was posted. This site sometimes...
    – RubberDuck
    Nov 23 '17 at 22:37

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