4

I've been using imran's great answer to flatten nested Python dictionaries, compressing keys and am trying to think of a way to further flatten the dictionaries that may be inside list values of the dictionary items.
(Of course, as my data is usually coming from XML this can also be recursive...)

from pprint import pprint
from collections import MutableMapping

def flatten(d, parent_key='', sep='_'):
    items = []
    for k, v in d.items():
        new_key = parent_key + sep + k if parent_key else k
        if isinstance(v, MutableMapping):
            items.extend(flatten(v, new_key, sep=sep).items())
        else:
            items.append((new_key, v))
    return dict(items)

Given a dict d like this:

d = {"a": 1,
     "b": 2,
     "c": {"sub-a": "one",
           "sub-b": "two",
           "sub-c": "thre"}}

this works great:

pprint(flatten(d))

        {'a': 1,
         'b': 2,
         'c_sub-a': 'one',
         'c_sub-b': 'two',
         'c_sub-c': 'thre'}

However, I would like to further recur through a list value of the dict items, and inspect if that each dict in the list can be further flattened.

Here's an example of sample input with c-list as a nested list value:

d = {"a": 1,
     "b": 2,
     "c-list": [
         {"id": 1, "nested": {"sub-a": "one", "sub-b": "two", "sub-c": "thre"} },
         {"id": 2, "nested": {"sub-a": "one", "sub-b": "two", "sub-c": "thre"} },
         {"id": 3, "nested": {"sub-a": "one", "sub-b": "two", "sub-c": "thre"} }]}

Here's what I currently get with the function above:

pprint(flatten(d))

{'a': 1,
 'b': 2,
 'c-list': [{'id': 1, 'nested': {'sub-a': 'one', 'sub-b': 'two', 'sub-c': 'thre'}},
            {'id': 2, 'nested': {'sub-a': 'one', 'sub-b': 'two', 'sub-c': 'thre'}},
            {'id': 3, 'nested': {'sub-a': 'one', 'sub-b': 'two', 'sub-c': 'thre'}}]}

Below is the output I'm looking for, retaining all the functionality of the original flatten():

{'a': 1,
 'b': 2,
 'c-list': [{'id': 1, 'nested_sub-a': 'one', 'nested_sub-b': 'two', 'nested_sub-c': 'thre'},
            {'id': 2, 'nested_sub-a': 'one', 'nested_sub-b': 'two', 'nested_sub-c': 'thre'},
            {'id': 3, 'nested_sub-a': 'one', 'nested_sub-b': 'two', 'nested_sub-c': 'thre'}]}

I'm struggling to figure out how to recursively "re-assemble" the dict into this when it contains lists... any tips appreciated.

2

You were really close, if a value is a list, then a single line is needed to gets you to a recursive version of flatten:

items.append((new_key, map(flatten, v)))  # for python 2.x
# or
items.append((new_key, list(map(flatten, v))))  # for python 3.x

So, you simply recursively call the function on each element.

Here is how flatten then would look like:

def flatten(d, parent_key='', sep='_'):
    items = []
    for k, v in d.items():
        new_key = '{0}{1}{2}'.format(parent_key,sep,k) if parent_key else k
        if isinstance(v, MutableMapping):
            items.extend(flatten(v, new_key, sep=sep).items())
        elif isinstance(v, list):
            # apply itself to each element of the list - that's it!
            items.append((new_key, map(flatten, v)))
        else:
            items.append((new_key, v))
    return dict(items)

This solution can cope with an arbitrary depth of lists in lists.

  • 2
    Why are you using lambda x: flatten(x), not just flatten? – Solomon Ucko Dec 1 '17 at 22:43
  • Interestingly, with my sample the output looks like this, being a map object rather than a dict: {'a': 1, 'b': 2, 'c-list': <map object at 0x7ff2ca0fb320>} – joefromct Dec 1 '17 at 22:45
  • 1
    Yes, python 3.6. I wrapped your lambda in a list() and i got the output i need. :) Like so list(map(lambda x: flatten(x), v)). – joefromct Dec 1 '17 at 22:52
  • 1
    @SolomonUcko you are completely right! The lambda made it in there because of me ctrl-c ctrl-v this part form one of my scripts. :P Damn you copy-paste! – jojo Dec 1 '17 at 23:11
  • 1
    FYI, if one wanted to use a different sep than the default, i believe we would need the lambda. for instance, passing in sep='.' would require the lambda, probably something like this: map(lambda x: flatten(x, parent='', sep=sep), v). (the sep=sep would reference the sep originally passed in...) – joefromct Dec 2 '17 at 3:05
1

Simply, do a flatten for each of the dictionaries inside the list, collect them into a new list and append it to items with the original key

def flatten(d, parent_key='', sep='_'):
        items = []
        for k, v in d.items():
            new_key = parent_key + sep + k if parent_key else k
            if isinstance(v, MutableMapping):
                items.extend(flatten(v, new_key, sep=sep).items())
            elif type(v) == list:
                items.append((new_key, [flatten(i) for i in v]))
            else:
                items.append((new_key, v))
        return dict(items)
  • 1
    but when you call flatten within flatten the you are also doing recursion! – dendragon Dec 1 '17 at 22:58
  • @dendragon That is not what I'm talking about. That will anyway happen if there are dictionaries under dictionaries in the original code by imran. – Aakash Verma Dec 1 '17 at 23:00
  • but what you write: iteration is faster than recursion, does then not make much sense – dendragon Dec 1 '17 at 23:03
  • Yeah, I see. I thought I am creating a new and different stack of recursion which would not hit the main stack. – Aakash Verma Dec 1 '17 at 23:08
  • List comprehension would indeed be faster than map(lambda(.. calls. For this particular case map alone does the trick and there is if any, a little speed advantage of map. – jojo Dec 1 '17 at 23:15

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