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I just took a quiz for my programming languages class and came across this question:

Assuming call by name, what are the results of following code:

public class MyClass {

    static int i = 1;

    static float f(int x, int i){
        int s = 0;
        for(i = 0; i <3; i++){
            s = s + x;
        }
        return s;
    }

    static void g(){
        int[] a= {10,30,50};
        int[] b = {20,40,60};
        System.out.println(f(i, i));
        i = 1;
        System.out.println(f(a[i],i));
        i = 1;
       System.out.println(f((a[i] *b[i]), i));
    }  



 public static void main(String[]args){
     g();

 }   
}

The above code is exactly as presented on my quiz, but it was on paper at the time so I did the calculations manually and got the results 3.0, 90.0, and 3600.0. After running the code on my own computer, the results are the same as what I calculated.

However, the question was multiple choice and the closest option available was 3.0, 90.0, and 4400.0. This leads me to assume that the words "Call by name" change how the function f is called on the line System.out.println(f((a[i] *b[i]), i));

Can someone please explain how 4400.0 is possible in Java or C++?

12
  • That wouldn't even compile in C++, so maybe 4400.0 is a compiler error message. Dec 1, 2017 at 22:40
  • You've only provided a snippet for the java portion of your question. Why make mention of c++ at all here? Dec 1, 2017 at 22:40
  • I know it won't compile in C++, but using a call by name function in c++ as an example would suffice and help me understand.
    – Remixt
    Dec 1, 2017 at 22:41
  • 1
    I love the plug in chug! Is it possible you misread what the function has in it? Dec 1, 2017 at 22:46
  • 2
    @PaulMcKenzie The point is to imagine the language (Java or C++) with the only change being that it uses call-by-name instead of the normal semantics. It's not a watertight concept, but it's good enough for a quiz question. Dec 1, 2017 at 23:45

1 Answer 1

3

In call-by-name, the expressions used as arguments are substituted directly in the called function. They are not evaluated before calling the function, but are substituted at each place the parameter occurs in the function.

This means the last call to f is equivalent to this:

int s = 0;
for(i = 0; i <3; i++){
    s = s + (a[i] * b[i]);
}
return s;

Here is the full sequence of steps inside the last call to f (I hope this is clear):

s = 0
i = 0

s = s + (a[i] * b[i])
  = 0 + (a[0] * b[0])
  = 0 + (10 * 20)
  = 200

i = 1

s = s + (a[i] * b[i])
  = 200 + (a[1] * b[1])
  = 200 + (30 * 40)
  = 200 + 1200
  = 1400

i = 2

s = s + (a[i] * b[i])
  = 1400 + (a[2] * b[2])
  = 1400 + (50 * 60)
  = 1400 + 3000
  = 4400

So you can see that s is 4400 when f returns.

10
  • That would return the same value for all prints. Dec 1, 2017 at 22:57
  • @user1803551 How do you figure that? Dec 1, 2017 at 22:59
  • I ran your code, that's how. Now that you expanded on the answer it's clear that you are actually doing something different than what you wrote in respect to the code in the question. Dec 1, 2017 at 23:04
  • As stated, the code snippet only applies to the last call to f, not to all the calls. So you can't have run my code for all the calls. Dec 1, 2017 at 23:06
  • Best if you post the code that you ran and gave you these results. Dec 1, 2017 at 23:10

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