So what I am trying to accomplish is to add ActionListener to a button which is defined in another class, without breaking encapsulation of this button.

My GUI class:

public class GUI extends JFrame {  

    private JButton button; 

    public GUI () { 
        this.button = new JButton ();
    }

    public void setText (Text text) {
        this.button.setText (text);
    }

    public JButton getButton () {
        return this.button;
    }    
}

My Game class:

public class Game { 

    private GUI gui;  

    public Game () {
        this.gui = new GUI ();
        this.gui.getButton ().addActionListener (new ActionListener () {
            public void actionPerformed (ActionEvent evt) {
                play ();                       
            }
        });  
    }

    public void play () {
        this.gui.setText ("Play");
    }
}

Then I call a new Game instance in the Main class.

I would like to get rid of the getter in GUI class, otherwise there is no point in using text setter or setters similar to that.

When I add ActionListener to GUI constructor, I have no access to Game methods than. Is there a solution that I don't see?

  • 1
    What are you trying to encapsulate and why? Simply add a addActionListenerToButton method to the GUI might solve the "issue" you have right now. – luk2302 Dec 2 '17 at 18:24
  • When I add ActionListener to GUI i can't use play () method from Game class, because I have already created instance of Game in Main class. – Ivan Horňák Dec 2 '17 at 18:30
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Let the GUI add the action listener to the button, let the Game create the action listener:

public class GUI extends JFrame { 

    public void addActionListenerToButton(ActionListener listener) {
        button.addActionListener(listener);
    }

    ....

}

public class Game { 

    private GUI gui;  

    public Game () {
        this.gui = new GUI ();
        this.gui.addActionListenerToButton (new ActionListener () {
            public void actionPerformed (ActionEvent evt) {
                play ();                       
            }
        });  
    }

    ...
}

Alternatively just pass in a functional interface instead of a fully built ActionListener.

Normally when I do this, I add an interface that describes the View (GUI), and then have the view implement that interface.

public interface MyView {
    void addActionListener( ActionListener l );
}

And the view:

public class GameGui implements MyView {
   // lots o' stuff

    public void addActionListener( ActionListener l ) {
       button.addActionListener( l );
    }
}

Then your main code is free from dependencies on what kind of view you actually implement.

public class Main {
    public static void main( String... args ) {
       SwingUtils.invokeLater( Main::startGui );
    }

    public static void startGui() {
       MyView gui = new GameGui();
       gui.addActionListener( ... );
    }
}

Don't forget that Swing is not thread safe and must be invoked on the EDT.

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.