0
use strict;
use warnings;

sub maximum_value {

    my @array  = @_;
    my @array1 = shift( @_ );
    my @array2 = push( @_, 0 );

    print "@array\n";
    print "@array1\n";
    print "@array2\n";

    my $i = 0;

    foreach ( @array ) {

        if ( $i < $_ ) {
            $i = $_;
        }
    }

    print "\nMax Value is $i";
}

maximum_value( 10, 15, 11, 13 );

This is a Perl script. I am passing the values to a subroutine and storing them in @_ . Why does @array2 evaluate to 4?

  • 2
    You already got a great answer but may I ask what you expected to be in @array2? – PerlDuck Dec 2 '17 at 19:34
8

perldoc -f push states:

Returns the number of elements in the array following the completed push.

  1. Your @_ starts with four elements because you invoked your sub with 4 arguments.
  2. You shift the first element from the @_ array. The shift returns the removed element. The @_ array now contains 3 elements.
  3. You push the zero onto the end of the @_ array, which contains 4 elements again. The push returns the number of elements, and assigns it to @array2.

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