I looked at other answers regarding search and replace, but I just can't understand the patterns.

How can I change this part of a file (line numbers 153 ... 156)

        let view = string.utf8
        offset.pointee += string.substring(to: range.lowerBound).utf8.count
        length.pointee = Int32(view.distance(from:range.lowerBound.samePosition(in: view), to:range.upperBound.samePosition(in: view)))
        return token

and replace it with the lines below?

        let view:String.UTF8View = string.utf8

        if let from = range.lowerBound.samePosition(in: view),
           let to = range.upperBound.samePosition(in: view) {
            offset.pointee += Int32(string[string.startIndex..<range.lowerBound].utf8.count)
            length.pointee = Int32(view.distance(from: from, to: to))
            return token
        } else {
            return nil
        }
  • Are the numbers 153-156 part of the input file? Or did you just show them here for illustration? – PerlDuck Dec 2 '17 at 20:55
  • was just showing them for illustration – sirvon Dec 2 '17 at 21:00
  • Do you need to replace strictly lines 153..156, or the code that you show (which may or may not be on those lines)? – zdim Dec 3 '17 at 1:13
  • replace what's in 153-156 with the 2nd snippet of code, which will take up more than 3 lines. – sirvon Dec 3 '17 at 19:54
up vote 4 down vote accepted

This might work for you (GNU sed & Bash):

sed $'153r replacementFile\n;153,156d' file

or for most seds:

sed -e '153r replacementFile' -e '153,156d' file

or if you prefer:

sed '153,156c\        let view:String.UTF8View = string.utf8\
    if let from = range.lowerBound.samePosition(in: view),\
       let to = range.upperBound.samePosition(in: view) {\
        offset.pointee += Int32(string[string.startIndex..<range.lowerBound].utf8.count)\
        length.pointee = Int32(view.distance(from: from, to: to))\
        return token\
    } else {\
        return nil\
    }' file

N.B. The first \ preserves leading space and each line following except the last needs to be appended with \. The markdown in SO does not format properly when an empty line is represented by a single \ (so I removed the second line of the replacement) but most shells should.

  • Hw do yo ou do this using variables instead of actual line numbers? – Mustafa Apr 25 at 20:23

If you haven't GNU-sed for @karafka's answer and just want change lines at exact line-numbers, you could use the ed too.

ed -s file <<'EOF'
153,156c
        let view:String.UTF8View = string.utf8

        if let from = range.lowerBound.samePosition(in: view),
           let to = range.upperBound.samePosition(in: view) {
            offset.pointee += Int32(string[string.startIndex..<range.lowerBound].utf8.count)
            length.pointee = Int32(view.distance(from: from, to: to))
            return token
        } else {
            return nil
        }
.
w
q
EOF

sed is probably the best tool for this,

assuming your replacement text is in file replace.txt

$ sed '153,156{153{r replace.txt
                  }; d}' file

might be only working for GNU sed

A Perl one-liner, to change lines 153..156 in file with contents of repl.file, in-place

perl -i -wpe'
    if   (153..155) { s/.*\n// }
    elsif ($.==156) { local $/; open $fh, "repl.file"; $_ = <$fh> };    
' file

(Or $_ = path($file_name)->slurp with Path::Tiny.)

This directly translates into a script, either by writing out a new file with changes and moving it over the original (see in perlfaq5 and SO posts), or perhaps by using -i ($^I) within a script.

  • 1
    If it's a one-liner, why isn't it all on one line. – user3439894 Dec 3 '17 at 4:00
  • 1
    @user3439894 The term "one-liner" stands for something that is feasible to execute directly from the command line; it doesn't have to be presented in one long line, and it often isn't (for readability). Also, modern shells allow multi-line input. This was written and tested in one (long) line. – zdim Dec 3 '17 at 4:05
  • @user3439894 It is also a useful device to test a crude version of code. If it satisfies then one can write a proper script, with error checks, options, more elaborate processing etc. This is how it's intended here. – zdim Dec 3 '17 at 4:40

This is a very good case for the application of the Tie::File module, which maps an array to the lines of a text file so that any changes you make to the array will be reflected in the disk file. It's a core module, so you shouldn't need to install it.

Here, the tie call maps the array @file to your text file, and splice replaces the four lines of text with the replacement contents read from DATA. Then untie updates and closes the file.

Note that you must alter myfile.txt to the real path to your input file.

use strict;
use warnings 'all';

use Tie::File;

tie my @file, 'Tie::File', 'myfile.txt' or die $!;

splice @file, 152, 4, <DATA>;

untie @file;



__DATA__
        let view:String.UTF8View = string.utf8

        if let from = range.lowerBound.samePosition(in: view),
           let to = range.upperBound.samePosition(in: view) {
            offset.pointee += Int32(string[string.startIndex..<range.lowerBound].utf8.count)
            length.pointee = Int32(view.distance(from: from, to: to))
            return token
        } else {
            return nil
        }

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