2

I'm trying to create a schema based on these 2 Functional Dependencies.

A -> B, C, D

B -> D

I'm trying to create a single table including both of these FDs with the following constraint:

  • A pair tuple (B, D) can be repetitive but follows the definition of FD ( whenever there are two B values that are same, then D values are same too).

Now, I have implemented this in 2 tables as follows:

CREATE TABLE one(
    B INT PRIMARY KEY,
    D INT NOT NULL,
    UNIQUE (B, D) 
); 

CREATE TABLE two(
    A INT PRIMARY KEY, 
    B INT NOT NULL,
    C INT NOT NULL, 
    D INT NOT NULL,
    FOREIGN KEY(B, D) REFERENCES one(B, D)
);

I'm just wondering if there is a way I can combine these 2 tables in just one table without using TRIGGERS in Postgresql?

EDIT:

Example data:

enter image description here

  • 2
    What do you mean by combine these 2 tables in just one table? Can you give examples of what you want, ideally including example data? (I believe I understand the constraints you describe, I just don't understand the last bit...) – MatBailie Dec 3 '17 at 2:34
  • @MatBailie I mean, instead of creating 2 separate tables, I just want to create one table containing all these attributes. I have edited the post with an example. – jeevaa_v Dec 3 '17 at 2:57
  • Okay, I think you mean I just want to create one table containing all these attributes AND enforce all of these constraints without requiring the second table... – MatBailie Dec 3 '17 at 3:19
  • @MatBailie Your "want" is not clear either; it doesn't say what the "combination" value is in terms of the two tables. jeevaa_v presumably wants their join, which is lossless & satisfies both FDs, instead of the two tables, which are projections of it. – philipxy Dec 4 '17 at 7:46
  • @philipxy - In the context on my having provided an answer, and that it was accepted, and commented on, I believe it is in fact relatively clear. – MatBailie Dec 4 '17 at 14:23
1

I had to learn it myself, but I think this is what you want...

CREATE EXTENSION btree_gist;

CREATE TABLE fd (
  a    INT PRIMARY KEY,
  b    INT NOT NULL,
  c    INT NOT NULL,
  d    INT NOT NULL,
  EXCLUDE USING gist (b WITH =, d WITH <>)
);

An exclude constraint checks all rows against each other, much like a UNIQUE constraint checks all rows against each other. But it's much more generalised.

If all of the checks (b WITH =, d WITH <>) are TRUE then the row is rejected.

(Conversely, that means a row is only acceptable if at least one check is FALSE.)

So, if two rows have the same b but different d the INSERT or UPDATE that is being run will fail.

http://dbfiddle.uk/?rdbms=postgres_10&fiddle=5fc308eaaedef4d3d2232ec3d70f3de6

  • That's exactly I was looking for. Just to be sure, this is not possible by only using Foreign Key/Unique constraint or Check constraint in Postgresql? – jeevaa_v Dec 3 '17 at 3:16
  • 1
    @jeeva_v Not if you only want one table... You've already shown how to do it with a foreign key... The only alternatives are triggers, etc, which all have race-condition issues. – MatBailie Dec 3 '17 at 3:18
  • 1
    Also, note that EXCLUDE is effectively a type of CHECK constraint. Just a very flexible one. – MatBailie Dec 3 '17 at 3:25
  • 1
    I've only just found it myself (don't use PostGreSQL much, went on to google to see if it had anything "novel" that would help you). Check this out... dbfiddle.uk/… – MatBailie Dec 3 '17 at 3:32
  • 1
    I'm totally geeking out on EXCLUDE constraints, RANGE types and RANGE operators now. Thanks for your question, I'd upvote twice if I could :) – MatBailie Dec 3 '17 at 3:45

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