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I have a huge project split up into 3 files. I normally have no problem using functions from one file in another file, but this time I am not able to do this. Further, I don't quite understand why one of my lists that I pass between files is disappearing after it passes out of the function.

File: settings.py

list1 = []

File: globals.py

from settings import *
def foo(hey):
    global list1
    list1.append(hey)

File: new_code.py

from settings import *
from globals import *
def cool_function():
    global list1
    list1 = []
    hey = "you"
    foo(hey)
    print (list1)


cool_function()

The problem is that my code cannot call foo from globals.py. I get an indentation error at foo. Even if that problem was solved, on the real project I'm working on list1 gets appended to in the settings.py file, but then it returns to empty after i return to the cool_function.

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Update: even by removing list1 = [] in the new_code.py file the code still is not able to call the function foo from settings.py. Here are the files if you want to take a look: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ZiTwl-DOPfZCrrrA1kBcBHh8c9AInFLI/view?usp=sharing > files

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Update: I changed the globals.py file to

from settings import * def foo(hey): list1.append(hey)

And the new_code.py files to

from settings import *
from globals import *
global list1
def cool_function():

    list1 = []
    hey = "you"
    foo(hey)
    print (list1)


cool_function()

And that solved the problem but I don't understand why.

  • Using import * is considered bad practice, use import func1,func2,func3 – Anton vBR Dec 3 '17 at 8:39
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2 bad ideas:

  1. use globals as a module name, globals is a built-in function's name.
  2. use global statement.

If you want to keep a global list object, a good practise is to wrap it to an object. Let it become a ref-type variable.

a better practise:

in settings.py:

class Settings(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.items = []

settings = Settings()

in your new_code.py:

from settings import settings

def cool_function():
    settings.items.append('something')
    return settings.items

print(cool_function())
  • Thanks but can you provide a solution without using classes? I do not like classes and do not use them. To my mind, they just make things more complicated. – fred russell Dec 3 '17 at 7:45
  • @fredrussell not have to use a class to do this. Actully your code would be just fine if you remove the line list1 = [] in new_code.py. – Yun Luo Dec 3 '17 at 7:53
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If you get an indentation error you should use your text editor's "render whitespace" feature to find the indentation problem

  • It's not an indentation error. The code cannot call the function from the other file and for that reasons thinks it's an indentation error even though it's not. – fred russell Dec 3 '17 at 7:45
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In new_code.py move globals list1 from cool_funtion to above cool-function

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