I have an exercise with this description:

1122 produces a sum of 3 (1 + 2) because the first digit (1) matches the second digit and the third digit (2) matches the fourth digit.
1111 produces 4 because each digit (all 1) matches the next.
1234 produces 0 because no digit matches the next.
91212129 produces 9 because the only digit that matches the next one is the last digit, 9.

I have written the following code:

String inputString = "1111"; // taking this number as example

int sum = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < inputString.length() - 1; i++) {
    if (inputString.charAt(i) == inputString.charAt(i + 1)) {
        sum += Integer.parseInt(String.valueOf(inputString.charAt(i)));
    }
    if (i + 2 == inputString.length() - 1) {
        if (inputString.charAt(i + 2) == inputString.charAt(0)) {
            sum += Integer.parseInt(String.valueOf(inputString.charAt(i + 2)));
        }
    }
}

The result of sum is 4, which is correct.

Now I'm trying to write the same one in Java8 using lambda but I can't figure out how to get the last condition inside my stream.

This is how far I got:

Integer sum = IntStream.range(0, (inputString.length() - 1)).boxed()
                .filter(j -> inputString.charAt(j) == inputString.charAt(j + 1))
                .mapToInt(i -> Integer.parseInt(String.valueOf(inputString.charAt(i)))).sum();
  • Can you explain real quick what you're trying to do, it's not just summing digits in a string ? I see you are checking for equality between digits. – prsvr Dec 4 '17 at 22:48
  • @FairPlay I updated the question. It's just a coding exercise that I solved and was wondering how I could do the same thing by using lambda. – Alex P. Dec 4 '17 at 22:52
  • 1
    This seems unclear for the actual conditions though. What would be the outputs for 111222, 121212, and 12221? – Rogue Dec 5 '17 at 0:05
  • @Rogue 111222 would produce 6, 121212 would produce 0 and 12221 would produce 5. This is how I understood the exercise – Alex P. Dec 5 '17 at 0:10
up vote 7 down vote accepted

The last condition is actually like the others if you consider the loop variable modulo the length: ((length-1) + 1) % length == 0

int length = inputString.length();

IntStream.range(0, length)
  .filter(i -> inputString.charAt(i) == inputString.charAt((i + 1) % length))
  .map(i -> Integer.parseInt(String.valueOf(inputString.charAt(i))))
  .sum();
  • you killed my answer ;-) . +1 for that. – Aomine Dec 5 '17 at 0:55
  • You are right. Now that you say it, it's obvious. Don't know why I didn't think of that. Thanks man! – Alex P. Dec 5 '17 at 6:53
  • 2
    Integer.parseInt(String.valueOf(inputString.charAt(i))) hurts my eyes. There is no need to create a String out of the single character, just to parse that string. You can just use Character.digit(inputString.charAt(i), 10). In this case, even inputString.charAt(i)-'0' would be sufficient. But +1 for deciphering the problem description and solving it. – Holger Dec 5 '17 at 12:05
  • @dfogni that % let's it act like a ring! very ingenious, plus one – Eugene Dec 5 '17 at 13:09
  • @Holger good point. It was rather my mistake, giving bad incentives. – Alex P. Dec 5 '17 at 14:08

This is going to get really messy with streams as far as my knowledge goes, nevertheless, I enjoyed the challenge and here's how I'd do it:

First, create two functions:

  1. a mapper function from char to int to help reduce the code we're going to keep repeating.
  2. a predicate like function to validate whether two given characters are equal; again to help reduce the code we're going to keep repeating.

that is:

public static int mapper(String value, int index){
    return Integer.parseInt(String.valueOf(value.charAt(index)));
}

public static boolean areEqual(String inputString, int firstIndex, int secondIndex){
      return inputString.charAt(firstIndex) == inputString.charAt(secondIndex);
}

then you can accomplish the task by doing:

int sum = IntStream.range(0, inputString.length() - 1)
            .map(i -> areEqual(inputString, i, i + 1) &&
                    i + 2 == inputString.length() - 1 &&
                    areEqual(inputString, i + 2, 0)?
                    mapper(inputString, i) + mapper(inputString, i + 2) :
                    areEqual(inputString, i , i + 1) &&
                            i + 2 != inputString.length() - 1 ?
                            mapper(inputString, i) :
                            i + 2 == inputString.length() - 1 &&
                                    areEqual(inputString,i + 2, 0) &&
                                    inputString.charAt(i) != inputString.charAt(i + 1) ?
                                    mapper(inputString, i + 2) :
                                    inputString.charAt(i) == inputString.charAt(i + 1) ?
                                            mapper(inputString, i) : 0
            )
            .sum();

The solution above takes into consideration all the possible conditions that could be met hence the need to subsequently keep checking different conditions.

As an aside, another thing you might want to do to reduce the code more is by making inputString a global variable which you can then directly use within the two helper functions and thus meaning we can get rid of the inputString parameter both for methods.

  • Dear God, mixture of lambdas and ternary, I didn't think that highly of "This is going to get really messy" when I first read it :D – prsvr Dec 4 '17 at 23:57
  • @FairPlay maybe someone else will come with a neater solution but sure was a nice challenge :-) – Aomine Dec 4 '17 at 23:59
  • 1
    Oh boy. Thanks mate, I'll upvote it for now. If there is no better answer than this then I'll accept it as answer. Clearly old school in this case seams more appealing though. – Alex P. Dec 5 '17 at 0:07
  • From @Rogue's comment I realized that this solution doesn't work with 111222. It should produce the sum of 6 but instead it produces 4. My old school code produces also 6 – Alex P. Dec 5 '17 at 0:14
  • 1
    @AlexP. see edit. I had forgotten one extra check. – Aomine Dec 5 '17 at 0:34

Seems like I have enormously overcomplicated my previous answer. Considering this is just for exercise purposes then you could just use a lambda statement block:

int sum1 = IntStream.range(0, inputString.length() - 1)
                .map(i -> {
                       int tempSum = 0;
                       if(areEqual(inputString, i, i + 1))
                             tempSum += mapper(inputString, i);

                       if (i + 2 == inputString.length() - 1)
                           if(areEqual(inputString, i + 2, 0))
                               tempSum += mapper(inputString, i + 2);

                       return tempSum;
                   }
                )
                .sum();

helper functions:

public static int mapper(String value, int index){
    return Integer.parseInt(String.valueOf(value.charAt(index)));
}

public static boolean areEqual(String inputString, int firstIndex, int secondIndex){
      return inputString.charAt(firstIndex) == inputString.charAt(secondIndex);
}

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