Suppose there are two unchangeable classes from a library, A and B, related like here:

class A
{
public:
    virtual void doCustomThings() = 0;
    virtual void doOtherThings() = 0;
    void doSomething();
private:
    SomeType1 someData;
};

class B : public A
{
public:
    void doCustomThings() override;
    void doOtherThings() override;
    void someUsefulUtility();
private:
    SomeType2 otherData;
};

I'm trying to implement the interface of A in terms of the some available in B, so I do:

class C : public B
{
public:
    void doCustomThings() override; // uses B::someUsefulUtility()
    // leave B::doOtherThings() not overridden
private:
    SomeType3 myData;
};

But I don't intend C to be B, i.e. I don't want references to C to be implicitly convertible to B&, although it should be convertible to A&.

First thing coming to mind is to use virtual inheritance, and then inherit public A, private B. But the A and B classes in my case are not editable, and for virtual inheritance to work here I need class B to inherit as public virtual A.

Another idea is to consider composition instead of inheritance. But if I derive from A and have B as a private member, I'll uselessly have A::someData twice, which looks inelegant.

Is there any good way to so something like class C : public A, private B, so that there'd be only one base class A, given the above mentioned constraints?

  • But I don't intend C to be B <-- Do you want C to be A? – skypjack Dec 5 '17 at 12:19
  • @skypjack yes, I want C to implement A's virtual methods. – Ruslan Dec 5 '17 at 12:20
  • Since B is an A, why does it matter if C converts to B? It will also be convertible to A, since B is an A. – ttemple Dec 5 '17 at 12:26
  • @ttemple because B has some extra functionality I don't want to expose in C. – Ruslan Dec 5 '17 at 12:28
  • make C inherit from A, move implementation of B into separate h and cpp, include and use this implementation in both B.cpp and C.cpp – Andrew Kashpur Dec 5 '17 at 12:44

Yes, use private inheritance and exposed the desired members with using.

class C : private B
{
public:
    using B::A;// to make it convertible to A
    using B::doOtherThings;

    void doCustomThings() override {
        std::cout<<"C::doCustomThings()\n";    
    }
private:
    char myData;
};

Working example.

  • 1
    C& is then not convertible to A&: e.g. A& ac=c; added to your working example doesn't compile. – Ruslan Dec 5 '17 at 13:19
  • @Ruslan Fixed, thanks for pointing that out – amc176 Dec 5 '17 at 14:16

Yes, only use inheritance for A, use composition for B, and delegate to the B member (not base)

class C : public A
{
public:
    void doOtherThings() override { myB.doOtherThings(); }

    void doCustomThings() override {
        std::cout<<"C::doCustomThings()\n";    
    }
private:
    B myB;
    SomeType3 myData;
};
  • How does this solve the duplicated A::someData problem? – Ruslan Dec 5 '17 at 13:28
  • Either you can safely ignore it, or whichever scheme you choose can't behave correctly in all cases – Caleth Dec 5 '17 at 13:33

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