This question arose from an issue that surfaced when using method chaining (fluent interface), and I suppose that's one of the only reasons it might be an issue at all.

To illustrate, I'll use an example using method chaining:

In unit A:

TParent = class
protected
  function DoSomething: TParent;
end;

In unit B:

TChild = class(TParent)
public
  procedure DoAnotherThing;
end;

implementation

procedure TChild.DoAnotherThing;
begin
  DoSomething.DoSomething
end;

I want to keep the DoSomething procedure protected and visible only to class descendants.

This won't compile, throwing a

cannot access protected symbol TParent.DoSomething

because DoSomething returns a TParent and the subsequent DoSomething call is issued from a TParent object in another unit (so the protection kicks in and the function is inaccessible). (thanks, David Heffernan, for the explanation)

To reduce it to its bare essence, something like TParent(Self).DoSomething is not possible inside the TChild class.

My question:

since the compiler does know that a copy of the Self parameter is being accessed from within the child class, would there be instances in which the ability to access the ancestor's protected methods breaks encapsulation? I'm only talking about dereferencing the typecasted Self from inside a descendant's class method. I'm aware that outside of this class, that parameter should not have access to the ancestor's protected methods (in another unit), of course.

Again, in short: when a variable, that is identical to the Self parameter, is dereferenced INSIDE one of its own class methods, would it be unsafe for the compiler to allow it access to its parent's protected methods (just like the Self parameter itself)?

It's a pretty theoretical question, but I'd be interested if it would have any negative impact on compiled code or encapsulation, if the compiler would allow this.

Thanks.

  • 6
    FWIW Stackoverflow is full of similar questions for other languages (like C++ and C# and they are not being closed for whatever reason) with incredibly good answers - valid question and possible to answer without being opinion based. – Stefan Glienke Dec 5 '17 at 14:55
  • 1
    @StefanGlienke I doubt that's true. But I can also see that there is a technical answer to be written here, which you have done, which renders the opinion based part of the question moot. – David Heffernan Dec 5 '17 at 15:17
  • 2
    You argue that the question is "primarily opinion-based" which I argued it is not but close it as "unclear what you're asking"? It is totally clear what he is asking. – Stefan Glienke Dec 5 '17 at 18:37
  • 1
    @DavidHeffernan You mean like on this question: stackoverflow.com/q/46012021/587106 ? – Stefan Glienke Dec 5 '17 at 22:47
  • 3
    @Domus: you may be kidding, but that's at least 50% true. The tags define how broad an answer you're looking for. By tagging with class compiler-construction protected you're opening the question to how should any object oriented language be designed (could be technical if you're looking for technical tradeoffs, but leans towards opinion) and therefore to the consequential is this Delphi design choice a good one (pure opinion). – torek Dec 6 '17 at 16:22
up vote 8 down vote accepted

protected means that you have access to those methods in your own instance. It does not mean that you have access to those methods on any other instances which are of a type you are deriving from.

The reason you can call DoSomething in TChild is because only Self has access to protected members of its ancestors.

The fact that in this particular case the result of the DoSomething method equals Self cannot be evaluated by the compiler (except by some static code analysis which I doubt any OOP language compiler out there does).

C++ solves this with being able to make TChild a friend class of TParent and thus giving it access to those methods.

In Delphi you get that feature if you put both classes into the same unit. If you want to keep both classes in their own units you can still use that feature by declaring a "cracker class". Just make a class that inherits from TParent and put that into the same unit as TChild. Then you can cast the result of DoSomething to that class and access the protected methods of TParent.

type
  TChild = class(TParent)
  public
    procedure DoAnotherThing;
  end;

implementation

type
  TParentAccess = class(TParent);

procedure TChild.DoAnotherThing;
begin
  TParentAccess(DoSomething).DoSomething;
end;

Update 6.12.2017:

You can also add a method to your TChild class to mimic the "friend status" (thanks Ken Bourassa).

type
  TChild = class(TParent)
  private
    type
      TParentAccess = class(TParent);
    function DoSomething: TParentAccess; inline;
  public
    procedure DoAnotherThing;
  end;

implementation

function TChild.DoSomething: TParentAccess;
begin
  Result := TParentAccess(inherited DoSomething);
end;

procedure TChild.DoAnotherThing;
begin
  DoSomething.DoSomething;
end;

A third possibility would be using a class helper to make the method accessible. This has the benefit of easy reusability as you just need to add the helper unit to any unit where you have a child of TParent and need access.

type
  TParentHelper = class helper for TParent
  public
    function DoSomething: TParent; inline;
  end;

implementation

function TParentHelper.DoSomething: TParent;
begin
  Result := inherited DoSomething;
end;
  • Thanks for your answer, Stefan. I don't want access to methods of other instances, though. I am specifically limiting the access to variables that are identical to Self and are used inside a descendant class' method. I probably didn't make myself clear, or I'm misreading your answer. I realize that what I'm trying to get at is only useful in method chaining. – Domus Dec 5 '17 at 15:01
  • @Domus, if it duck typing yoau are after, look Duck typing in Delphi 2007? – LU RD Dec 5 '17 at 15:12
  • @LURD Not exactly, but thanks for that reference! Had read about duck typing a decade or so ago, but it was a nice refresher! – Domus Dec 5 '17 at 15:16
  • @Domus As I wrote in my second paragraph - it would define an exception to OOP rules just for one specific value which the compiler could only find with static code analysis - i.e. finding out that DoSomething returns Self. It just sees the return type and applies standard OOP rules / static typing to it. – Stefan Glienke Dec 5 '17 at 16:11
  • @StefanGlienke I'll accept it as not possible for the compiler. Of course, I'm sure it is possible to do, just not worth the effort. Thanks. – Domus Dec 5 '17 at 16:15

Well, the child might be identical, but it might not.

Consider a slight expansion to your example.

TParent = class
protected
  function DoSomething: TParent;
end;

and unit 2

TChild = class(TParent)
public
  procedure DoAnotherThing;
end;

TChild2 = class(TParent)
public
  procedure DoAnotherThing;
  function DoSomething: Child2;
end;

implementation

procedure TChild.DoAnotherThing;
begin
  DoSomething.DoSomething
end;

procedure TChild2.DoAnotherThing;
var
  p : TParent;
begin
  p := DoSomething;
  p.DoSomething;
end;

Now the value returned by DoSomething certainly is a TParent. It might be a TChild or indeed a TChild2 or even something that you have very little knowledge of (other than that it is descended from TParent).

If the returned value is really a TChild, then certainly access is no problem - it is knows how to handle its own data type, but if not then it has no right to access the protected functions of the other object. If the returned value is a TChild you can do what you want, like this

procedure TChild.DoAnotherThing;
var
  p : TParent;
begin
  p := DoSomething;
  if p is TChild then (p as TChild).DoSomething;
end;

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