So I need to have a code that checks one integer, and checks if the integer after it is the same value. If so, it will add the value to x.

input1 = [int(i) for i in str(1234441122)]
x= 0

So my code currently gives the result [1, 2, 3, 4, 4, 4, 1, 1 ,2 ,2]. I want it to give the result of x = 0+4+4+1+2. I do not know any way to do that.

  • 3
    What did you try so far? – Spiros Dec 5 '17 at 14:52
  • I tried to use print (1(input1)) to see if that would show the first integer, but that didn't work. – ALAN Dec 5 '17 at 14:55
  • Edit your question to include the rest of the code you tried – cricket_007 Dec 5 '17 at 14:57
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up vote 8 down vote accepted

The following will work. Zip together adjacent pairs and only take the first elements if they are the same as the second ones:

>>> lst = [1, 2, 3, 4, 4, 4, 1, 1, 2, 2]
>>> sum(x for x, y in zip(lst, lst[1:]) if x == y)
11

While this should be a little less [space-]efficent in theory (as the slice creates an extra list), it still has O(N) complexity in time and space and is well more readable than most solutions based on indexed access. A tricky way to avoid the slice while still being concise and avoiding any imports would be:

>>> sum((lst[i] == lst[i-1]) * lst[i] for i in range(1, len(lst)))  # Py2: xrange
11

This makes use of the fact that lst[i]==lst[i-1] will be cast to 0 or 1 appropriately.

  • A bit shorter: sum((i and x == lst[i-1]) * x for i, x in enumerate(lst)) – Stefan Pochmann Dec 5 '17 at 16:08

Another way using itertools.groupby

l = [1, 2, 3, 4, 4, 4, 1, 1 ,2 ,2]
from itertools import groupby
sum(sum(g)-k for k,g in groupby(l))
#11
  • Or sum(sum(g) - k for k, g in groupby(l)). – Stefan Pochmann Dec 5 '17 at 15:28
  • @Stefan - wow, good idea. thanks. will update – Transhuman Dec 5 '17 at 15:29
  • I like this one, too :) very creative! – schwobaseggl Dec 5 '17 at 15:31

You can try this:

s = str(1234441122)
new_data = [int(a) for i, a in enumerate(s) if i+1 < len(s) and a == s[i+1]]
print(new_data)
final_data = sum(new_data)

Output:

[4, 4, 1, 2]
11
  • instead of i+1 < len(s) you could simply slice the string. input1 = sum([int(n) if n == str_repr[i+1] else 0 for i, n in enumerate(str_repr[:-1])]) – Ev. Kounis Dec 5 '17 at 14:57

No need for that list. You can remove the "non-repeated" digits from the string already:

>>> n = 1234441122
>>> import re
>>> sum(map(int, re.sub(r'(.)(?!\1)', '', str(n))))
11

You are simply iterating on string and converting character to integer. You need to iterate and compare to next character.

a = str(1234441122)
sum = 0
for i,j in enumerate(a[:-1]):
    if a[i] == a[i+1]:
        sum+=int(a[i])
print(sum)

Output

11

Try this one too:

input1 = [int(i) for i in str(1234441122)]
x= 0
res = [input1[i] for i in range(len(input1)-1) if input1[i+1]==input1[i]]
print(res)
print(sum(res))

Output:

[4, 4, 1, 2]
11

Here's a slightly more space efficient version of @schwobaseggl's answer.

>>> lst = [1, 2, 3, 4, 4, 4, 1, 1, 2, 2]
>>> it = iter(lst)
>>> next(it) # throw away first value
>>> sum(x for x,y in zip(lst, it) if x == y)
11

Alernatively, using an islice from the itertools module is equivalent but looks a bit nicer.

>>> from itertools import islice
>>> sum(x for x,y in zip(lst, islice(lst, 1, None, 1)) if x == y)
11

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