13

I am building a library project in which I have a FirebaseMessagingService. I also have a FirebaseMesagingService in my app. What I see is, whenever an FCM is sent from the server, only one FirebaseMessagingService processes it. This was not the case when I was using GCM Receivers. Both the GCM Receivers used to receive the message and based on message content, they would/would not do anything about it.

How can I achieve the same in FCM.

3
  • what do you mean..? You want more than one FirebaseMessagingService? Jan 25, 2018 at 6:55
  • Did you manage to find a solution so far? Can I ask what method you ended up using? Thanks!
    – Ripityom
    May 28, 2018 at 7:45
  • 1
    Hey @Ripityom, I answered below. Let me know if the explanation is not clear.
    – Kanika
    May 30, 2018 at 17:22

5 Answers 5

6

Your library's manifest should not have a FirebaseMessagingService subclass. Adding the messa service to the app's manifest should be a part of the integration step, integrating the SDK. Also you should provide a hook in the SDK from where the app can pass the FCM message payload to the SDK.

Essentially if the app does not have its own FirebaseMessagingService subclass it would add your SDK's listener service in the manifest else it will add the hook in its own listener service which passes the payload to your SDK and SDK takes the required action

3
  • 2
    This question concerns FirebaseMessagingService, not FirebaseListenerService. The documentation at firebase.google.com/docs/reference/android/com/google/firebase/… explicitly recommends subclassing that service, with sample manifest xml.
    – Cliabhach
    Jan 24, 2018 at 21:59
  • 1
    I meant the subclass itself, maybe it wasn't clear and sorry about the MessagingService and ListenerService typo mixed up the naming convention of fcm and gcm
    – Umang
    Jan 25, 2018 at 6:52
  • 1
    right, that helps a little. I've removed my downvote. The answer is still confusing - perhaps you could add an explanation of your reasoning? Something like 1. in each APK, only one FMS subclass can receive push messages; 2. if you add two libraries to the APK, each with their own subclasses, only one would receive push messages; 3. therefore apps should receive push messages with their own subclass; 4. libraries should provide a hook (NOT a subclass) which the app subclass can call whenever it wants the library to do its thing; 5. this makes sure the app is always in control
    – Cliabhach
    Feb 1, 2018 at 17:56
3

The android app cannot have multiple FirebaseMessagingService as its a service not a receiver. What one can do, is to check two conditions:

  1. If app has FCMMessagingService registered in its functionality, then provide a method in the library project which can take the message as parameter, received by app's FCMMessagingService.

  2. If the app does not have FCM functionality integrated in it, then have FCMMessagingService in your library project which can handle the fcm sent by the server.

3

I've got the same issue a few days ago and in our team, we used a slightly different approach which involves reflection.

In general, we use delegate class and provide context via reflection.

public class OwnPushService extends FirebaseMessagingService {

    private List<FirebaseMessagingService> messagingServices = new ArrayList<>(2);

    public GCPushService() {
        messagingServices.add(new AirshipFirebaseMessagingService());
        messagingServices.add(new TLFirebaseMessagingService());
    }

    @Override
    public void onNewToken(String s) {
        delegate(service -> {
            injectContext(service);
            service.onNewToken(s);
        });
    }

    @Override
    public void onMessageReceived(RemoteMessage remoteMessage) {
        delegate(service -> {
            injectContext(service);
            service.onMessageReceived(remoteMessage);
        });
    }

    private void delegate(GCAction1<FirebaseMessagingService> action) {
        for (FirebaseMessagingService service : messagingServices) {
            action.run(service);
        }
    }

    private void injectContext(FirebaseMessagingService service) {
        setField(service, "mBase", this); // util method for recursive field search
    }
}

I've written an article on Medium about this approach if you are interested in the details: link

2
1

In such cases, you should make your LibraryFirebaseMessagingService as parent of your AppFirebaseMessagingService, and declare only AppFirebaseMessagingService in app's AndroidManifest.xml file.

For Example:

in your Library:

public class LibraryFirebaseMessagingService extends FirebaseMessagingService {
    @Override
    public void onMessageReceived(RemoteMessage remoteMessage) {
         //Your library logic
    }
}

Now in your app:

public class AppFirebaseMessagingService extends LibraryFirebaseMessagingService {
    @Override
    public void onMessageReceived(RemoteMessage remoteMessage) {
         if(shouldLibraryHandlethis(remoteMessage)) {
            super.onMessageReceived(remoteMessage);
         } else {
            //Your app logic
         }
    }
}

Now in your app's AndroidManifest.xml file:

<service
    android:name=".AppFirebaseMessagingService"
    android:exported="false">
    <intent-filter>
        <action android:name="com.google.firebase.MESSAGING_EVENT" />
    </intent-filter>
</service>

No need to declare LibraryFirebaseMessagingService in any AndroidManifest.xml

2
  • 1
    What happens if all libraries use this approach, how would you extend them all
    – Jemshit
    Mar 22, 2021 at 14:01
  • it working for me ,please remember to add super.onMessageReceived(remoteMessage);
    – Satya
    Aug 8, 2023 at 15:14
1

If you look at the source code of the Android Firebase Messaging, you will see that a broadcast receiver is used to listen for the “com.google.android.c2dm.intent.RECEIVE” event. The old event name from the GCM is also used in Firebase Cloud Messaging. It is possible to have multiple broadcast receivers, so your library can register its receiver in the android manifest:

<application>
    <receiver
        android:name="com.mylibrary.FirebaseMessagingReceiver"
        android:permission="com.google.android.c2dm.permission.SEND"
        android:exported="true">
        <intent-filter>
            <action android:name="com.google.android.c2dm.intent.RECEIVE" />
        </intent-filter>
    </receiver>
</application>

A broadcast receiver in your library will receive Firebase cloud messages:

class FirebaseMessagingReceiver: BroadcastReceiver() {
    override fun onReceive(context: Context, intent: Intent) {
        
    }
}

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