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I am trying to make a web tool that takes user imputed values as a list of objects and a number of objects to randomly choose and then will print out the number of objects chosen from the list at random when the button is clicked. However i have not been able to get anything to print. I have tried to call the variables both with qoutes and without them and i still haven't gotten the compute to print any results in the final read only textbox. I think the issue is somewhere in my script functions but i cant figure out where and i've spent hours looking up syntax and possible issues to no avail. Ive tried to work with inner.html without success and the current method (document.getById....) is copied from http://www.mauvecloud.net/randomchooser.html that works to randomly choose one thing and print the result.

<html>
<style></style>
<head>

<title>Random Chooser</title>



<script>

 Array.protoype.chooseFromArray() = function(){
    var chosenIndex = Math.floor(Math.random() * ValueArray.length);
    var elementPicked = ValueArray["chosenIndex"];
    ValueArray.splice("chosenIndex",1);
    return elementPicked;
    }

function chooseRandomly(){
    var ValueArray = document.getElementById("valuelist").value.split("\n");
    var numItems = document.getElementById("items").value;
    var ReturnArray = [];
    for(i=0; i < numItems; i++){
    var element = ValueArray.chooseFromArray();
    ReturnArray.push("element");
    }
    document.getElementById("result").value = ReturnArray.toString();

    }

</script>

<body>
Enter some values, one on each line, then click the choose button to pick randomly.
    <form action onsubmit="return false;">
        <textarea id="valuelist" rows="15" cols="60"></textarea>
        <br>
        <br>
        Randomly choose <input type="number" id="items"  > items
        <br>
        <input type="button" value="Choose" onclick="chooseRandomly();return false">
        <br>
        <br>
        <input id="result" type="text" size="80" value readonly="readonly">
        <br>
        <br>
    </form>


</body>

</html>
  • ps. i do have a closing tag for head in between the closing script and the starting body tag it just uploaded weird – Kyle Olson Dec 6 '17 at 0:41
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You're confused on a few JavaScript syntax points. I won't bother correcting the non-idiomatic style, you should read more about that here on your own once you understand the changes outlined below.

First, here's the cleaned up and fixed version so we can take a look at it together:

Array.prototype.chooseFromArray = function() {
    var chosenIndex = Math.floor(Math.random() * this.length);
    var elementPicked = this[chosenIndex];
    this.splice(chosenIndex, 1);
    return elementPicked;
}

function chooseRandomly() {
    var ValueArray = document.getElementById("valuelist").value.split("\n");
    var numItems = document.getElementById("items").value;
    var ReturnArray = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < numItems; i++) {
        var element = ValueArray.chooseFromArray();
        ReturnArray.push(element);
    }

    document.getElementById("result").value = ReturnArray.toString();
}

window.chooseRandomly = chooseRandomly;

First thing's first, to reference a function from HTML on JSFiddle you'll need it to be defined on the window. You don't normally need to do that, so you can mostly ignore that point.

Generally, you have several syntax errors.

Defining a property on an object (prototypes are objects (MDN)) happens just like variable assignment, so you just write object.<property_name> = value. You were calling chooseFromArray then assigning to that call (which is just invalid syntax).

When creating functions for prototypes, this will usually reference the object calling the function. In this case, any array calling chooseFromArray will have itself bound to the this reference inside the prototype function.

When accessing properties through the indexer you just pass the string. If it's a variable, you don't surround it with strings. Ex:

var chosenIndex = 123;
var elementPicked = this["chosenIndex"];
// This is the same as this.elementPicked;

var elementPicked = this[chosenIndex];
// This is what you want as you're accessing the `123` property on `this`

The same goes for passing variables to functions. You just pass the variable. Anything inside of 's, ' ` 's and "s are string literals and will not reference any variables.

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