10

I'm trying to figure out a less-boilerplate-y way to implement an ActivityModule that is used in all of my app activities. This is my current setup:

ActivityModule:

@Module
class ActivityModule(private val activity: Activity) {

    @Provides @ActivityScope
    fun providesActivity(): Activity = activity

    @Provides @ActivityContext @ActivityScope
    fun providesContext(): Context = activity

    @Provides @ActivityContext @ActivityScope
    fun providesLayoutInflater(): LayoutInflater = activity.layoutInflater

    @Provides @ActivityContext @ActivityScope
    fun providesResources(): Resources = activity.resources

}

AppActivityModule(provides activities for AndroidInjectionModule)

@Module(subcomponents = [
        AppActivityModule.WelcomeActivityComponent::class
    ])
    internal abstract class AppActivityModule {

        @Binds 
        @IntoMap 
        @ActivityKey(WelcomeActivity::class)
        abstract fun bindWelcomeActivityInjectorFactory(builder: WelcomeActivityComponent.Builder): AndroidInjector.Factory<out Activity>

        @ActivityScope
        @Subcomponent(modules = [(ActivityModule::class)])
        interface WelcomeActivityComponent : AndroidInjector<WelcomeActivity> {
        @Subcomponent.Builder abstract class Builder : AndroidInjector.Builder<WelcomeActivity>() {
            abstract fun activityModule(myActivityModule: ActivityModule): AndroidInjector.Builder<WelcomeActivity>

            override fun seedInstance(instance: WelcomeActivity) {
                activityModule(ActivityModule(instance))
            }
        }
    }
}

What I want AppActivityModule to be instead is:

@Module
internal abstract class AppActivityModule {
    @ContributesAndroidInjector(modules = [(ActivityModule::class)])
    abstract fun contributeWelcomeActivityInjector(): WelcomeActivity
}

But this, quite understandbly, gives me an error /di/AppActivityModule_ContributeWelcomeActivityInjector.java:29: error: @Subcomponent.Builder is missing setters for required modules or subcomponents: [...di.modules.ActivityModule]

My question is - is there a less boilerplate-y way to achieve what I'm trying to do? I know about @Bind and @BindsInstance (from this answer) but this seems to only work if I have a module-per activity and bind the concrete activity type which I don't want in this case - I want ActivityModule to work with all activities.

5

One way to minimize the boilerplate is to make a generic ActivityModule and then create a small specific Module per Activity. Forgive my Kotlin inexperience, but here goes:

// Abstract class so you don't have to provide an instance
@Module
abstract class ActivityModule {

    // No need for ActivityScope: You're always binding to the same Activity, so
    // there's no reason to have Dagger save your Context instance in a Provider.
    @Binds @ActivityContext
    abstract fun providesContext(activity: Activity): Context

    // This doesn't *have* to be in a companion object, but that way
    // Android can do a static dispatch instead of a virtual method dispatch.
    // If you don't need that, just skip the constructor arguments and make these
    // normal methods and you'll be good to go.
    @Module
    companion object {
        @JvmStatic @Provides @ActivityContext
        fun providesLayoutInflater(activity: Activity): LayoutInflater = 
            activity.layoutInflater

        @JvmStatic @Provides @ActivityContext
        fun providesResources(activity: Activity): Resources = activity.resources
    }
}

And your module:

@Module
internal abstract class AppActivityModule {

    @Module
    internal interface WelcomeActivityModule {
      // The component that @ContributesAndroidInjector generates will bind
      // your WelcomeActivity, but not your Activity. So just connect the two,
      // and suddenly you'll have access via injections of Activity.
      @Binds fun bindWelcomeActivity(activity: WelcomeActivity) : Activity
    }

    @ContributesAndroidInjector(
        modules = [ActivityModule::class, WelcomeActivityModule::class])
    abstract fun contributeWelcomeActivityInjector(): WelcomeActivity
}

Note that though this works for Activity, Service, BroadcastReceiver, and others, you might not want to be so quick about it for Fragment. This is because dagger.android handles fragment hierarchies with parent fragments, so from within a child component you might have access to YourApplication, YourActivity, YourParentFragment, and YourChildFragment, and all of their components. If something in YourChildFragmentComponent depends on an unqualified Fragment, it would be ambiguous whether it really wants YourParentFragment or YourChildFragment. That said, this design does make sense for Activities and certain Fragments, so it makes sense to use it (cautiously).

  • companion object is still an object, so what you say about "static dispatch instead of a virtual method dispatch" is not true. @JvmStatic creates a static method, that calls an instance method on the companion object. There's no way to use static provides in a Kotlin-only codebase, as far as I know. Either you have to make the module in Java, or the component in Java. – arekolek Feb 8 '18 at 12:01
  • 2
    @arekolek You're right that the companion object is implemented in Kotlin as a Singleton, and that an instance call is necessary in Kotlin. (I hadn't know that.) On the other hand, Kotlin handles that static indirection transparently, while Dagger will see a @Provides instance method and assume that each Component instance needs to keep an instance of the Module regardless of what Kotlin does behind the scenes. Also, if Kotlin's generated instance method is final, it will still translate into static dispatch even if it's on an instance method. (I'd need to dig in to the bytecode.) – Jeff Bowman Feb 8 '18 at 18:36
  • Hmm, it makes sense that a static method calling a final method on an object kept in a static final field could be optimized by the compiler, although this is the first time I hear about it. Methods are final by default in Kotlin and they can't be made open in objects, I checked the bytecode and it's final indeed. Can you point me to some documentation that says no virtual method call happens in this scenario? – arekolek Feb 10 '18 at 4:10
  • 1
    By the way, it seems that you have to annotate the companion object with @Module, just to make dagger-compiler happy. Also, providesContext should be declared abstract, to make Kotlin happy. – arekolek Feb 10 '18 at 4:21
  • 1
    @arekolek Because the method call goes to a final method, there is no other possible implementation, so JLS 8.4.3.3 allows that "at run time, a machine-code generator or optimizer can 'inline' the body of a final method, replacing an invocation of the method with the code in its body." To be fair, this SO answer rebuts that, saying that the Hotspot VM will optimize pre-emptively and undo if an override is found. I don't know offhand what Dalvik and ART do. – Jeff Bowman Feb 10 '18 at 4:21

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