1

I am trying to exit a program without using exit(). I have come up with a very convoluted and dirty solution (I am a Beginner). I would like to use if statements and if it is true, then I would like to use goto to go the main function and then return 3; and end the program.

Here is a bit of code:

    FILE *filepointer;

      char * line = NULL;
      size_t len = 0;
      size_t read;
      int linecount = 0;
      filepointer = fopen(filename, "r");
      if (filepointer == NULL)
        {
          printf("[ERR] Could not read file %s.\n",filename );
          goto FILE_ERROR;
        }
    ...
    int main(){
    ...
    FILE_ERROR: return 3;

}

This however does not work as I cannot get jump between functions because I get undeclared Label as an error. Is there any way I can exclude exit() from my program and still end it returning a certain value. If there is a better solution, please let me know

  • 3
    Suggestion: Refactor your logic, then the code. goto is considered evil. – Sourav Ghosh Dec 6 '17 at 10:04
  • 4
    Don't... just don't – StoryTeller Dec 6 '17 at 10:04
  • Answer is clear, always avoid to use goto and jumps in code, but if you really want to look how it works and can be used, look eg there stackoverflow.com/questions/2891766/… – xxxvodnikxxx Dec 6 '17 at 10:12
  • Just return to main when you want to exit, and have main return. If you can't structure your program to do this, then you could use setjmp/longjmp. I don't really see the point of this though. – Tom Karzes Dec 6 '17 at 10:13
4

The only good answer to this question is: don't do it. gotos used in this way make your code very hard to reason about.

Refactor your code so that you have a clear structure and hierarchy of calls. Use return values to propagate success/failure throughout the call stack.

2

goto can't be used to jump across different functions; it can only be used within the same function. To jump between functions, you can look at setjmp() and longjmp() functions.

Having said, since you claim to be a beginner, I am not convinced you really need to use either of the above. You can simply modify your function to return an "error" value. And in main(), check its value and return from main() with the error value.

  • 3
    Please do not look at setjmp() and longjmp() until you understand how to properly structure your code. – Vittorio Romeo Dec 6 '17 at 10:07
  • I am not exactly a follower of carg-cult programming. That's why I mentioned it can be done. But it's not really OP you needed. – usr Dec 6 '17 at 10:15
  • 1
    @cmaster: The “never” is terrible advice. There are legitimate uses for setjmp and longjmp, even if there are many associated hazards. Unlike, for example, gets which is far less safe than longjmp. – Dietrich Epp Dec 6 '17 at 15:27
  • 1
    With careful programming, SIGSEGV is recoverable from userspace itself without involving "uncontrollable ways". In short, there are genuine use-cases for setjmp/longjmp even in userspace programs. – usr Dec 7 '17 at 12:46
  • 1
    @cmaster: A SIGSEGV is not actually undefined behavior. It sounds like you have very strong opinions on this subject, but I honestly am a bit hurt by some of these responses like “I would throw you off my project if you did this” or “deeply broken code”. Is that an appropriate comment? It also sounds like there are a large number of assumptions here, like about half-constructed objects. If you are allocating those objects in a pool, which is not unusual, you can simply free the pool after the longjmp. There is a great variety of coding styles, coding styles you don’t like are not “wrong”. – Dietrich Epp Dec 7 '17 at 17:36
0

By design, a goto cannot jump from one function to another. It can only be used to jump within a given function.

There are ways to jump between functions, but doing so is not only very poor design but also dangerous as it is very easy to put your program in an invalid state.

The proper way to handle this is to have your function return a specific value (or set of values) to indicate an error. Then the calling function would check for one of those error values and act accordingly.

For example:

int readFile(char *filename)
{
  FILE *filepointer;

  char * line = NULL;
  size_t len = 0;
  size_t read;
  int linecount = 0;
  filepointer = fopen(filename, "r");
  if (filepointer == NULL)
    {
      // add strerror(error) to the error message to know why fopen failed
      printf("[ERR] Could not read file %s: %s.\n",filename, strerror(errno) );
      // error completion
      return 0;
    }
  ...
  // successful completion
  return 1;
}

int main(){
   ...
   if (readFile("myfile") == 0) {
       return 3;
   }
   ...
}

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