6

Currently I'm using JSON as a serialization format to transfer a simple hash containing strings, numbers and an array from Ruby into a Python script:

IO.popen('./convert.py', 'w') do |w|
    w.write({ :height => height, :width => width, :id => job_id, :data => pix }.to_json)
    w.write "\n"
    w.close_write
end

In this case height, width and job_id are all numbers and pix is an array of arrays of integers.

The python script this is running is:

#!/usr/bin/env python

from PIL import Image
import json
import sys

output = json.load(sys.stdin)

width = output['width']
height = output['height']
name = 'images/' + str(output['id']) + '/image.bmp'
data = [ tuple(datum) for datum in output['data'] ]

img = Image.new("RGB", (width, height))

img.putdata(data)

img.save(name)

A bit of quick testing utilising an array with 3.9 million values (probably around 1/4 of the size that will normally be used) revealed the script to take around 105 seconds, and 90 seconds with all lines below output = ... commented out. Obviously it would be good if the serialisation didn't take 85% of the processing time for such a simple script.

The only method to speed this up that I can think of is to find some form of binary serialisation/marshalling that could be utilised to transfer the data from Ruby to Python. Unfortunately I have been unable to find any such system, only RMarshal which appears to be able to work the other way.

9

Maybe MessagePack is the way to go then. Bindings for several languages exist, including Ruby and Python.

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  • Thanks, just tested it and it's down to ~20 seconds now; so probably only around 1/4 of the time spent on serialisation. Can't believe I hadn't heard of / couldn't find this before. – Nemo157 Jan 22 '11 at 12:07
2

It certainly appears generating and (especially) parsing the JSON could be improved, as a simple custom format led to a huge difference, without resorting to a non-text format. I had to change your use of putdata (specifically the format of data passed into it), otherwise the below test isn't significantly different.

$ time ./gen-json.py 1500 900 json | ./read-json.py 

real    0m50.727s
user    0m50.131s
sys     0m0.164s
$ time ./gen.py 1500 900 custom | ./read.py 

real    0m3.786s
user    0m6.076s
sys     0m0.064s

Forgive the general hackiness in these, as they were written in about 5 minutes just to start determining where the problem might lie. However, everything seems to work fine in them; at least I can open the BMPs created. :)

gen-json.py

#!/usr/bin/env python2.6
import sys

width, height, img_id = sys.argv[1:]
width = int(width)
height = int(height)
print """{"width": %s, "height": %s, "id": "%s", "data": [""" % (width, height, img_id)
row = str([0 for _ in xrange(width)])
first = True
for _ in xrange(height):
  if first:
    first = False
  else:
    print ","
  print row,
print "]}"

read-json.py

#!/usr/bin/env python2.6
import json
import sys
from PIL import Image

output = json.load(sys.stdin)

width = output['width']
height = output['height']
name = 'image-%s.bmp' % output['id']
data = []
assert len(output['data']) == height
for x in output['data']:
  assert len(x) == width
  data.extend(x)

img = Image.new("RGB", (width, height))
img.putdata(data)
img.save(name)

gen.py

#!/usr/bin/env python2.6
import sys

width, height, img_id = sys.argv[1:]
width = int(width)
height = int(height)
print img_id, width, height
for _ in xrange(height):
  for _ in xrange(width):
    print 0,
  print

read.py

#!/usr/bin/env python2.6
import sys
from PIL import Image

img_id, width, height = raw_input().split()
width = int(width)
height = int(height)
name = "image-%s.bmp" % img_id
data = [int(x) for row in sys.stdin for x in row.split()]
assert len(data) == width * height

img = Image.new("RGB", (width, height))
img.putdata(data)
img.save(name)
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