8

I've got a Sequence (from File.walkTopDown) and I need to run a long-running operation on each of them. I'd like to use Kotlin best practices / coroutines, but I either get no parallelism, or way too much parallelism and hit a "too many open files" IO error.

File("/Users/me/Pictures/").walkTopDown()
    .onFail { file, ex -> println("ERROR: $file caused $ex") }
    .filter { ... only big images... }
    .map { file ->
        async { // I *think* I want async and not "launch"...
            ImageProcessor.fromFile(file)
        }
    }

This doesn't seem to run it in parallel, and my multi-core CPU never goes above 1 CPU's worth. Is there a way with coroutines to run "NumberOfCores parallel operations" worth of Deferred jobs?

I looked at Multithreading using Kotlin Coroutines which first creates ALL the jobs then joins them, but that means completing the Sequence/file tree walk completly bfore the heavy processing join step, and that seems... iffy! Splitting it into a collect and a process step means the collection could run way ahead of the processing.

val jobs = ... the Sequence above...
    .toSet()
println("Found ${jobs.size}")
jobs.forEach { it.await() }
7
0

The problem with your first snippet is that it doesn't run at all - remember, Sequence is lazy, and you have to use a terminal operation such as toSet() or forEach(). Additionally, you need to limit the number of threads that can be used for that task via constructing a newFixedThreadPoolContext context and using it in async:

val pictureContext = newFixedThreadPoolContext(nThreads = 10, name = "reading pictures in parallel")

File("/Users/me/Pictures/").walkTopDown()
    .onFail { file, ex -> println("ERROR: $file caused $ex") }
    .filter { ... only big images... }
    .map { file ->
        async(pictureContext) {
            ImageProcessor.fromFile(file)
        }
    }
    .toList()
    .forEach { it.await() }

Edit: You have to use a terminal operator (toList) befor awaiting the results

| improve this answer | |
  • I though that would work, but it still seems to process the final forEach sequentially. eg. .map { file -> async(CommonPool) { println("start") val img = ImageFile.fromFile(file) println("end") img } } .forEach { imageFiles.add(it.await()) if (Math.random() > 0.999) { imageFiles.save() } } – Benjamin H Dec 8 '17 at 4:33
  • Oh, snap, you are right. Now I think there is no way to do it with Sequences. Edited the answer – voddan Dec 8 '17 at 6:01
  • 2
    It's worth noting that using a limited thread pool limits parallelism but not concurrency meaning that if ImageProcessor.fromFile is a suspending function (that doesn't block) you can still process multiple files at ones which is maybe not what you want. – Nicklas A. Feb 7 '19 at 16:11
4
0

I got it working with a Channel. But maybe I'm being redundant with your way?

val pipe = ArrayChannel<Deferred<ImageFile>>(20)
launch {
    while (!(pipe.isEmpty && pipe.isClosedForSend)) {
        imageFiles.add(pipe.receive().await())
    }
    println("pipe closed")
}
File("/Users/me/").walkTopDown()
        .onFail { file, ex -> println("ERROR: $file caused $ex") }
        .forEach { pipe.send(async { ImageFile.fromFile(it) }) }
pipe.close()
| improve this answer | |
1
0

This doesn't preserve the order of the projection but otherwise limits the throughput to at most maxDegreeOfParallelism. Expand and extend as you see fit.

suspend fun <TInput, TOutput> (Collection<TInput>).inParallel(
        maxDegreeOfParallelism: Int,
        action: suspend CoroutineScope.(input: TInput) -> TOutput
): Iterable<TOutput> = coroutineScope {

    val list = this@inParallel

    if (list.isEmpty())
        return@coroutineScope listOf<TOutput>()

    val brake = Channel<Unit>(maxDegreeOfParallelism)
    val output = Channel<TOutput>()
    val counter = AtomicInteger(0)

    this.launch {

        repeat(maxDegreeOfParallelism) {
            brake.send(Unit)
        }

        for (input in list) {

            val task = this.async {
                action(input)
            }

            this.launch {
                val result = task.await()
                output.send(result)
                val completed = counter.incrementAndGet()
                if (completed == list.size) {
                    output.close()
                } else brake.send(Unit)
            }

            brake.receive()
        }
    }

    val results = mutableListOf<TOutput>()
    for (item in output) {
        results.add(item)
    }

    return@coroutineScope results
}

Example usage:

val output = listOf(1, 2, 3).inParallel(2) {
    it + 1
} // Note that output may not be in same order as list.
| improve this answer | |
0
0

This will cap coroutines to workers. I'd recommend watching https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3WGM-_MnPQA

package com.example.workers

import kotlinx.coroutines.*
import kotlinx.coroutines.channels.ReceiveChannel
import kotlinx.coroutines.channels.produce
import kotlin.system.measureTimeMillis

class ChannellibgradleApplication

fun main(args: Array<String>) {
    var myList = mutableListOf<Int>(3000,1200,1400,3000,1200,1400,3000)
    runBlocking {
        var myChannel = produce(CoroutineName("MyInts")) {
            myList.forEach { send(it) }
        }

        println("Starting coroutineScope  ")
        var time = measureTimeMillis {
            coroutineScope {
                var workers = 2
                repeat(workers)
                {
                    launch(CoroutineName("Sleep 1")) { theHardWork(myChannel) }
                }
            }
        }
        println("Ending coroutineScope  $time ms")
    }
}

suspend fun theHardWork(channel : ReceiveChannel<Int>) 
{
    for(m in channel) {
        println("Starting Sleep $m")
        delay(m.toLong())
        println("Ending Sleep $m")
    }
}
| improve this answer | |

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