I would like to reverse a dataframe with dummy variables. For example,

from df_input:

Course_01 Course_02 Course_03 
  0           0         1 
  1           0         0 
  0           1         0 

To df_output

   Course
0 03
1 01
2 02

I have been looking at the solution provided at Reconstruct a categorical variable from dummies in pandas but it did not work. Please, Any help would be much appreciated.

Many Thanks, Best Regards, Carlo

up vote 4 down vote accepted

We can use wide_to_long, then select rows that are not equal to zero i.e

ndf = pd.wide_to_long(df, stubnames='T_', i='id',j='T')

      T_
id  T     
id1 30   0
id2 30   1
id1 40   1
id2 40   0

not_dummy = ndf[ndf['T_'].ne(0)].reset_index().drop('T_',1)

   id   T
0  id2  30
1  id1  40

Update based on your edit :

ndf = pd.wide_to_long(df.reset_index(), stubnames='T_',i='index',j='T')

not_dummy = ndf[ndf['T_'].ne(0)].reset_index(level='T').drop('T_',1)

        T
index    
1      30
0      40
  • Thanks Dark. Unfortunately, when I apply your solution to my data, it generate more rows than it should. In particular, it create <id2,30>, <id2,40> and <id1,30, id1,40>, which is not the expected result. – Carlo Allocca Dec 7 '17 at 12:12
  • 1
    @CarloAllocca much better if you put sample of actual data in this kind of cases. – Dark Dec 7 '17 at 12:12
  • @CarloAllocca I have used the data not equal to 0, maybe you are not running that – Dark Dec 7 '17 at 12:14
  • wide_to_long not very often used function, plus1 ;) – jezrael Dec 7 '17 at 12:20
  • whats happening in drop('T_',1) – pyd Dec 7 '17 at 12:38

You can use:

#create id to index if necessary
df = df.set_index('id')
#create MultiIndex
df.columns = df.columns.str.split('_', expand=True)
#reshape by stack and remove 0 rows
df = df.stack().reset_index().query('T != 0').drop('T',1).rename(columns={'level_1':'T'})
print (df)
    id   T
1  id1  40
2  id2  30

EDIT:

col_name = 'Course' 
df.columns = df.columns.str.split('_', expand=True)
df = (df.replace(0, np.nan)
        .stack()
        .reset_index()

        .drop([col_name, 'level_0'],1)
        .rename(columns={'level_1':col_name})
)
print (df)
  Course
0     03
1     01
2     02
  • Thanks Jezrael. As Dark said, I think that I am providing wrong data. I am modifying the above description with actual data. – Carlo Allocca Dec 7 '17 at 12:21
  • @CarloAllocca Is it that big data? You put the data and expected output later, I have to go now, let me update the answer and go. – Dark Dec 7 '17 at 12:24
  • Thanks Dark. no it is not that big. it is just a sample. Many Thanks. – Carlo Allocca Dec 7 '17 at 12:26
  • @CarloAllocca Got to go, check the edit, hope it helps. If not these answerers might update much better one. All you need to remove in these answers is set_index() – Dark Dec 7 '17 at 12:30
  • Thanks Dark and Jezrael. I am sure that your solution are correct, but I don't know what I do wrong that when applied to my data, it does not provide the right solution. I decided to publish a sample of my data. – Carlo Allocca Dec 7 '17 at 12:44

Suppose you have the following dummy DF:

In [152]: d
Out[152]:
    id  T_30  T_40  T_50
0  id1     0     1     1
1  id2     1     0     1

we can prepare the following helper Series:

    In [153]: v = pd.Series(d.columns.drop('id').str.replace(r'\D','').astype(int), index=d.columns.drop('id'))

In [155]: v
Out[155]:
T_30    30
T_40    40
T_50    50
dtype: int64

now we can multiply them, stack and filter:

In [154]: d.set_index('id').mul(v).stack().reset_index(name='T').drop('level_1',1).query("T > 0")
Out[154]:
    id   T
1  id1  40
2  id1  50
3  id2  30
5  id2  50

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.