Homework question:

  • Cygwin GNU GDB
  • Cygwin GNU GCC

Attempting to establish the length of the hypotenuse C from the square root of A power of 2 and B power of 2.

Example input:

Enter the length of two sides of a right-angled triangle: 2.25 8.33

Answer:

The length of the hypotenuse is: 8.628523

  • Question: when I specify the same input as above, the result is not the same - output is 19.84.9596

Full code below:

float squareRoots(float *s)
{
    float cx;
    float nx;
    float e;

    cx = 1;
    nx = (cx +*s/cx)/2;
    e = nx - cx;
    cx = nx;

    if (e*e > 0.001)
    {
        nx = (cx +*s/cx)/2;
        return nx;
    } else {
        return nx;
    }
}

float hypotenuse(float *a, float *b)
{
    float c;
    //raise a to power of 2
    *a = (*a * *a);
    *b = (*b * *b);
    //add a and b
    float y = *a + *b;
    c = squareRoots(&y);

    return c;
}


int main()
{
    float x,y;

    printf("Enter the length of two sides of a right-angled triangle:");
    scanf("%f %f", &x, &y);
    float k=hypotenuse(&x,&y);

    printf("The length of the hypotenuse is: %f", k);

    exit(0);
}

closed as not a real question by HaskellElephant, Tchoupi, jonsca, Yan Berk, Jason Sturges Sep 28 '12 at 3:15

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Why on earth are you passing pointers to floats instead of passing by value? – Andrew Medico Jan 25 '09 at 1:11
  • @Andrew - I agree; indeed, given that the code is modifying the values too, it is pretty horrible. – Jonathan Leffler Jan 25 '09 at 2:56

The square root algorithm you're (supposed to be?) using is called Newton's method. Your if statement should be a while loop.

Replace

if (e*e > 0.001)
{
        nx = (cx +*s/cx)/2;
        return nx;
} else {
        return nx;
}

with a while loop that iteratively does the same, but includes recalculating e.

I would give you the working code, but you said this is homework. If you can't get it to work, post your new code and I'll be happy to help you troubleshoot.

  • @Bill: It's usually called 'Newton–Raphson', at least in most of the refs I've seen :) – Mitch Wheat Jan 25 '09 at 1:38
  • Cannot believe I didn't notice this... – Aaron Jan 25 '09 at 2:25
  • @Atklin: If you've taken a numerical methods course recently, you should have. :) – Bill the Lizard Jan 25 '09 at 2:41

Want a super-duper square root implementation? Check out John Carmack's magic square root from Quake III.

float Q_rsqrt( float number )
{
  long i;
  float x2, y;
  const float threehalfs = 1.5F;

  x2 = number * 0.5F;
  y  = number;
  i  = * ( long * ) &y;  // evil floating point bit level hacking
  i  = 0x5f3759df - ( i >> 1 ); // what the ****?
  y  = * ( float * ) &i;
  y  = y * ( threehalfs - ( x2 * y * y ) ); // 1st iteration
  // y  = y * ( threehalfs - ( x2 * y * y ) ); // 2nd iteration, this can be removed

  #ifndef Q3_VM
  #ifdef __linux__
    assert( !isnan(y) ); // bk010122 - FPE?
  #endif
  #endif
  return y;
}
  • Unfortunately, I have to use the described algorithm... – Nefeli Jan 25 '09 at 0:49
  • Note that this is actually the inverse square root function, so you have to 1/x the result to get the square root. – Bill the Lizard Jan 25 '09 at 1:58
  • The "wtf" part will become clear after reading the IEEE spec and figuring out how to write sqrt in terms of log2. Also, papers have been written about the constant used. – Jasper Bekkers Jan 25 '09 at 2:00
  • Also, in contrast to common belief, the constant isn't the initial guess. The (i >> 1) part does that plenty. The only thing the constant does is adjust the initial guess. – Jasper Bekkers Jan 25 '09 at 2:16

I make the answer 8.628522469, i.e. 8.628522.

  • Using the same code? Strange - I'm compiling under cygwin using GNU GDB... – Nefeli Jan 25 '09 at 0:48
  • No, you are not compiling with gdb. You're probably compiling with gcc. – Andrew Medico Jan 25 '09 at 1:13