384

I'm using the scrollTo jQuery plugin and would like to know if it is somehow possible to temporarily disable scrolling on the window element through Javascript? The reason I'd like to disable scrolling is that when you scroll while scrollTo is animating, it gets really ugly ;)

Of course, I could do a $("body").css("overflow", "hidden"); and then put it back to auto when the animation stops, but it would be better if the scrollbar was still visible but inactive.

  • 10
    If it is still showing, then the user is trained to think that it must be functioning. If the dose not move or dose not respond, then it will break the users mental model of how you page works and result in confusion. I would just find a better way of dealing with scrolling whilst animating, like for instance stopping the animation. – Marcus Whybrow Jan 22 '11 at 19:31
  • Another solution: stackoverflow.com/questions/9280258/… – gdbj Aug 31 '17 at 20:13

32 Answers 32

664

The scroll event cannot be canceled. But you can do it by canceling these interaction events:
Mouse & Touch scroll and Buttons associated with scrolling.

[Working demo]

// left: 37, up: 38, right: 39, down: 40,
// spacebar: 32, pageup: 33, pagedown: 34, end: 35, home: 36
var keys = {37: 1, 38: 1, 39: 1, 40: 1};

function preventDefault(e) {
  e = e || window.event;
  if (e.preventDefault)
      e.preventDefault();
  e.returnValue = false;  
}

function preventDefaultForScrollKeys(e) {
    if (keys[e.keyCode]) {
        preventDefault(e);
        return false;
    }
}

function disableScroll() {
  if (window.addEventListener) // older FF
      window.addEventListener('DOMMouseScroll', preventDefault, false);
  window.onwheel = preventDefault; // modern standard
  window.onmousewheel = document.onmousewheel = preventDefault; // older browsers, IE
  window.ontouchmove  = preventDefault; // mobile
  document.onkeydown  = preventDefaultForScrollKeys;
}

function enableScroll() {
    if (window.removeEventListener)
        window.removeEventListener('DOMMouseScroll', preventDefault, false);
    window.onmousewheel = document.onmousewheel = null; 
    window.onwheel = null; 
    window.ontouchmove = null;  
    document.onkeydown = null;  
}
  • 101
    Tip for other devs stuck in this trap: Do make sure you remove any and all 'e.stopPropagation()' calls from other jQuery attempts to stop scrolling, because not only does it not work, it prevents the event from bubbling to THIS code that DOES work. Hopefully my wasted 30 mins will help save someone else time :) – Dirk van Bergen Jan 7 '13 at 13:01
  • 2
    this doesn't work in firefox. any ideas? – Janusz Krawiec Jun 25 '13 at 11:11
  • 4
    You can add 32 (space) to the disabled keys array (show in the code comments). – gblazex Jun 30 '13 at 13:28
  • 9
    I can scroll this like I always do: using middle button press and moving the mouse... Therefore this trick will not affect such users as me ;) – Denis V Dec 22 '13 at 11:34
  • 6
    The scrollbar is not disabled. – verism Nov 12 '14 at 12:22
389

Do it simply by adding a class to the body:

.stop-scrolling {
  height: 100%;
  overflow: hidden;
}

Add the class then remove when you want to re-enable scrolling, tested in IE, FF, Safari and Chrome.

$('body').addClass('stop-scrolling')

For mobile devices, you'll need to handle the touchmove event:

$('body').bind('touchmove', function(e){e.preventDefault()})

And unbind to re-enable scrolling. Tested in iOS6 and Android 2.3.3

$('body').unbind('touchmove')
  • 4
    Got it! You have to handle the touchmove event, as with $('body').bind('touchmove', function(e){e.preventDefault()}). Edited this answer to include this mobile solution. – MusikAnimal Nov 19 '12 at 21:46
  • 3
    Cool, just have to make sure any inner scrolling can work in the modal for the touch device. Could do an overlay just underneath the modal and prevent the default touchmove on the overlay instead of body. – hallodom Nov 20 '12 at 9:43
  • 55
    While this solution does work, it has the (potentially) undesirable effect of scrolling back to the top of the page. – Matt Feb 28 '13 at 16:21
  • 3
    This didn't work for me unless my selector was $('body,html') – PickYourPoison Jan 25 '14 at 16:50
  • 19
    This solution works but the scroll bar disappear and create a 'bump' effect (under window os) when you apply this class to the body (for example) – Georgio Jun 30 '14 at 20:30
50

Here's a really basic way to do it:

window.onscroll = function () { window.scrollTo(0, 0); };

It's kind of jumpy in IE6.

  • 13
    Not really a disabling, more like a snap to default when the scroll is attempted. – Marcus Whybrow Jan 22 '11 at 19:34
  • 10
    @Marcus As good as it's going to get with an event that isn't cancelable. – sdleihssirhc Jan 22 '11 at 19:35
  • 1
    It may interfere with jQuery scrollTo plugin. – gblazex Jan 22 '11 at 20:07
  • 2
    Even though it doesn't disable it for real, it simulates it and that's good enough for me. – Chris Bier Jun 5 '12 at 18:40
  • 10
    IMHO - best answer here. Plus, you don't have to lock it to (0, 0), just use the current scroll position. – YemSalat May 20 '15 at 1:42
27

The following solution is basic but pure JavaScript (no jQuery):

function disableScrolling(){
    var x=window.scrollX;
    var y=window.scrollY;
    window.onscroll=function(){window.scrollTo(x, y);};
}

function enableScrolling(){
    window.onscroll=function(){};
}
  • 3
    Jumpy in Safari 7.1 and IE 11. Newest Chrome, Firefox, Opera ok. – Timo Kähkönen Dec 9 '14 at 18:39
  • This does work, much appreciated. – MarkyMarksFunkyBunch May 16 '18 at 18:02
  • Still a tiny bit jumpy on newest Chrome – Jason Allshorn Nov 13 '18 at 0:57
  • Working fine, In safari, chrome, but flickered in IE – Bhuvan Arora Nov 14 '18 at 6:00
24

This solution will maintain the current scroll position whilst scrolling is disabled, unlike some which jump the user back to the top.

It's based on galambalazs' answer, but with support for touch devices, and refactored as a single object with jquery plugin wrapper.

Demo here.

On github here.

/**
 * $.disablescroll
 * Author: Josh Harrison - aloof.co
 *
 * Disables scroll events from mousewheels, touchmoves and keypresses.
 * Use while jQuery is animating the scroll position for a guaranteed super-smooth ride!
 */

;(function($) {

    "use strict";

    var instance, proto;

    function UserScrollDisabler($container, options) {
        // spacebar: 32, pageup: 33, pagedown: 34, end: 35, home: 36
        // left: 37, up: 38, right: 39, down: 40
        this.opts = $.extend({
            handleKeys : true,
            scrollEventKeys : [32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40]
        }, options);

        this.$container = $container;
        this.$document = $(document);
        this.lockToScrollPos = [0, 0];

        this.disable();
    }

    proto = UserScrollDisabler.prototype;

    proto.disable = function() {
        var t = this;

        t.lockToScrollPos = [
            t.$container.scrollLeft(),
            t.$container.scrollTop()
        ];

        t.$container.on(
            "mousewheel.disablescroll DOMMouseScroll.disablescroll touchmove.disablescroll",
            t._handleWheel
        );

        t.$container.on("scroll.disablescroll", function() {
            t._handleScrollbar.call(t);
        });

        if(t.opts.handleKeys) {
            t.$document.on("keydown.disablescroll", function(event) {
                t._handleKeydown.call(t, event);
            });
        }
    };

    proto.undo = function() {
        var t = this;
        t.$container.off(".disablescroll");
        if(t.opts.handleKeys) {
            t.$document.off(".disablescroll");
        }
    };

    proto._handleWheel = function(event) {
        event.preventDefault();
    };

    proto._handleScrollbar = function() {
        this.$container.scrollLeft(this.lockToScrollPos[0]);
        this.$container.scrollTop(this.lockToScrollPos[1]);
    };

    proto._handleKeydown = function(event) {
        for (var i = 0; i < this.opts.scrollEventKeys.length; i++) {
            if (event.keyCode === this.opts.scrollEventKeys[i]) {
                event.preventDefault();
                return;
            }
        }
    };


    // Plugin wrapper for object
    $.fn.disablescroll = function(method) {

        // If calling for the first time, instantiate the object and save
        // reference. The plugin can therefore only be instantiated once per
        // page. You can pass options object in through the method parameter.
        if( ! instance && (typeof method === "object" || ! method)) {
            instance = new UserScrollDisabler(this, method);
        }

        // Instance already created, and a method is being explicitly called,
        // e.g. .disablescroll('undo');
        else if(instance && instance[method]) {
            instance[method].call(instance);
        }

    };

    // Global access
    window.UserScrollDisabler = UserScrollDisabler;

})(jQuery);
  • Glad it's useful. NB I've edited with a link to this in jQuery plugin format. – Josh Harrison Apr 25 '14 at 12:08
  • Might help if the disable scroll button actually worked – cameronjonesweb May 22 '14 at 12:05
  • @user1672694, it works here in Chrome. What's your browser and which demo page have you found the bug on? Any JS errors in the console? – Josh Harrison May 23 '14 at 11:36
  • @ZougenMoriver today it is working. That is weird. – cameronjonesweb May 24 '14 at 9:04
  • 1
    Please disregard, I found that binding it mousewheel worked a charm – adamj Jul 24 '15 at 7:09
14

I'm sorry to answer an old post but I was looking for a solution and came across this question.

There are many workarounds for this issue to still display the scrollbar, like giving the container a 100% height and an overflow-y: scroll styling.

In my case I just created a div with a scrollbar which I display while adding overflow: hidden to the body:

function disableScroll() {
    document.getElementById('scrollbar').style.display = 'block';
    document.body.style.overflow = 'hidden';
}

The element scrollbar must have this styles:

overflow-y: scroll; top: 0; right: 0; display: none; height: 100%; position: fixed;

This shows a grey scrollbar, hope it helps future visitors.

8

I was looking out for a solution to this problem but was not satisfied with the any of the above solutions (as of writing this answer), so I came up with this solution..

CSS

.scrollDisabled {   
    position: fixed;
    margin-top: 0;// override by JS to use acc to curr $(window).scrollTop()
    width: 100%;
}

JS

var y_offsetWhenScrollDisabled=0;

function disableScrollOnBody(){
    y_offsetWhenScrollDisabled= $(window).scrollTop();
    $('body').addClass('scrollDisabled').css('margin-top', -y_offsetWhenScrollDisabled);
}
function enableScrollOnBody(){
    $('body').removeClass('scrollDisabled').css('margin-top', 0);
    $(window).scrollTop(y_offsetWhenScrollDisabled);
}
  • I found this worked for me if I added overflow-y: scroll to the .scrollDisabled style. Otherwise, there was a little jump as the scrollbar hid each time. Of course, that only works for me because my page it long enough to need a scrollbar even on the largest displays. – Andrew Miner Feb 21 '16 at 5:04
7

According to the galambalazs post I would add support for touch devices, allowing us to touch but no scroll up or down:

function disable_scroll() {
   ...
   document.ontouchmove = function(e){ 
        e.preventDefault(); 
   }
}

function enable_scroll() {
   ...
   document.ontouchmove = function(e){ 
     return true; 
   }
}
  • 2
    Are you sure that it is an answer not just a comment of other answer? – IvanH Aug 23 '13 at 13:55
4

Another solution:

body {
    overflow-y: scroll;
    width: 100%;
    margin: 0 auto;
}

This way you always have a vertical scrollbar, but as most of my content is longer than the viewport, this is ok for me. Content is centered with a separate div, but without setting margin again in body my content would stay at the left.

These are the two function I use to show my popup/modal:

var popup_bodyTop = 0;
var popup_bodyLeft = 0;

function popupShow(id)
{
    $('#'+ id).effect('fade');
    $('#popup-overlay').effect('fade');

    // remember current scroll-position
    // because when setting/unsetting position: fixed to body
    // the body would scroll to 0,0
    popup_bodyLeft = $(document).scrollLeft();
    popup_bodyTop  = $(document).scrollTop();

    // invert position
    var x = - popup_bodyLeft;
    var y = - popup_bodyTop;

    $('body').css('position', 'fixed');
    $('body').css('top', y.toString() +'px');
    $('body').css('left', x.toString() +'px');
}

function popupHide(id)
{
    $('#'+ id).effect('fade');
    $('#popup-overlay').effect('fade');
    $('body').css('position', '');
    $('html, body').scrollTop(popup_bodyTop);
    $('html, body').scrollLeft(popup_bodyLeft);
}

Result: non scrollable background and no re-positioning of the content because of the left scrollbar. Tested with current FF, Chrome and IE 10.

  • This worked for me and the problem of scrolling to the top after using position:fixed. Thank u! – Annia Martinez Feb 16 '18 at 9:32
3

How about this? (If you're using jQuery)

var $window = $(window);
var $body = $(window.document.body);

window.onscroll = function() {
    var overlay = $body.children(".ui-widget-overlay").first();

    // Check if the overlay is visible and restore the previous scroll state
    if (overlay.is(":visible")) {
        var scrollPos = $body.data("scroll-pos") || { x: 0, y: 0 };
        window.scrollTo(scrollPos.x, scrollPos.y);
    }
    else {
        // Just store the scroll state
        $body.data("scroll-pos", { x: $window.scrollLeft(), y: $window.scrollTop() });
    }
};
  • a bit jumpy, but this works for IE 7 (client uses it). other solutions do not. – niki b Apr 22 '14 at 19:40
3

Depending on what you want to achieve with the removed scroll you could just fix the element that you want to remove scroll from (on click, or whatever other trigger you'd like to temporarily deactivate scroll)

I was searching around for a "temp no scroll" solution and for my needs, this solved it

make a class

.fixed{
    position: fixed;
}

then with Jquery

var someTrigger = $('#trigger'); //a trigger button
var contentContainer = $('#content'); //element I want to temporarily remove scroll from

contentContainer.addClass('notfixed'); //make sure that the element has the "notfixed" class

//Something to trigger the fixed positioning. In this case we chose a button.
someTrigger.on('click', function(){

    if(contentContainer.hasClass('notfixed')){
        contentContainer.removeClass('notfixed').addClass('fixed');

    }else if(contentContainer.hasClass('fixed')){
        contentContainer.removeClass('fixed').addClass('notfixed');
    };
});

I found that this was a simple enough solution that works well on all browsers, and also makes for simple use on portable devices (i.e. iPhones, tablets etc). Since the element is temporarily fixed, there is no scroll :)

NOTE! Depending on the placement of your "contentContainer" element you might need to adjust it from the left. Which can easily be done by adding a css left value to that element when the fixed class is active

contentContainer.css({
    'left': $(window).width() - contentContainer.width()/2 //This would result in a value that is the windows entire width minus the element we want to "center" divided by two (since it's only pushed from one side)
});
3

I'm using showModalDialog, for showing secondary page as modal dialog.

to hide main window scrollbars:

document.body.style.overflow = "hidden";

and when closing modal dialog, showing main window scrollbars:

document.body.style.overflow = "scroll";

to access elements in main window from dialog:

parent.document.getElementById('dialog-close').click();

just for anybody searching about showModalDialog:(after line 29 of original code)

document.getElementById('dialog-body').contentWindow.dialogArguments = arg;
document.body.style.overflow = "hidden";//****
document.getElementById('dialog-close').addEventListener('click', function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    document.body.style.overflow = "scroll";//****
    dialog.close();
});
  • This worked for me in React where jQuery is non existent and where React does not have access to manage the state of the body tag. – Jon Nov 22 '16 at 16:35
2

Cancelling the event's as in the accepted answer is a horrible method in my opinion :/

Instead I used position: fixed; top: -scrollTop(); below.

Demo: https://jsfiddle.net/w9w9hthy/5/

From my jQuery popup project: https://github.com/seahorsepip/jPopup

//Freeze page content scrolling
function freeze() {
    if($("html").css("position") != "fixed") {
        var top = $("html").scrollTop() ? $("html").scrollTop() : $("body").scrollTop();
        if(window.innerWidth > $("html").width()) {
            $("html").css("overflow-y", "scroll");
        }
        $("html").css({"width": "100%", "height": "100%", "position": "fixed", "top": -top});
    }
}

//Unfreeze page content scrolling
function unfreeze() {
    if($("html").css("position") == "fixed") {
        $("html").css("position", "static");
        $("html, body").scrollTop(-parseInt($("html").css("top")));
        $("html").css({"position": "", "width": "", "height": "", "top": "", "overflow-y": ""});
    }
}

This code takes, width, height, scrollbar and pagejump issues into consideration.

Possible issues resolved with above code:

  • width, when setting position fixed the html element width can be smaller then 100%
  • height, same as above
  • scrollbar, when setting position fixed the page content no longer has a scrollbar even when it had a scrollbar before resulting in a horizontal pagejump
  • pagejump, when setting position fixed the page scrollTop is no longer effective resulting in a vertical pagejump

If anyone has any improvements to above page freeze/unfreeze code let me know so I can add those improvements to my project.

2

As of Chrome 56 and other modern browsers, you have to add passive:false to the addEventListener call to make preventDefault work. So I use this to stop scrolling on mobile:

function preventDefault(e){
    e.preventDefault();
}

function disableScroll(){
    document.body.addEventListener('touchmove', preventDefault, { passive: false });
}
function enableScroll(){
    document.body.removeEventListener('touchmove', preventDefault, { passive: false });
}
1

Building on Cheyenne Forbes' answer, and one I found here via fcalderan: Just disable scroll not hide it? and to fix Hallodom's issue of the scrollbar disappearing

CSS:

.preventscroll{
    position: fixed;
    overflow-y:scroll;
}

JS:

whatever.onclick = function(){
    $('body').addClass('preventscroll');
}
whatevertoclose.onclick = function(){
    $('body').removeClass('preventscroll');
}

This code does jump you to the top of the page, but I think that fcalderan's code has a workaround.

1

I know this is an old question, but I had to do something very similar, and after some time looking for an answer and trying different approaches, I ended up using a very easy solution.

My problem was very similar, almost identical, the only difference is I didn't have to actually show the scroll bar - I just had to make sure its width would still be used, so the page's width would not change while my overlay was displayed.

When I start sliding my overlay into the screen, I do:

$('body').addClass('stop-scrolling').css('margin-right', 8);

and after I slide my overlay off the screen I do:

$('body').removeClass('stop-scrolling').css('margin-right', 0);

IMPORTANT: this works perfectly because my overlay is positioned absolute, right: 0px when visible.

1

I have the same problem, below is the way I handle it.

/* file.js */
var body = document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0];
//if window dont scroll
body.classList.add("no-scroll");
//if window scroll
body.classList.remove("no-scroll");

/* file.css */
.no-scroll{
  position: fixed;
  top: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
}

hope this help.

  • This works but it scrolls the page to the top. – Curtis Apr 10 '18 at 5:21
1

The simplest method is:

$("body").css("overflow", "hidden"); // Remove the scroll bar temporarily

To undo it:

$("body").css("overflow", "auto");

Easy to implement, but the only downside is:

  • The page will jump a bit to the left if it is center-aligned (horizontally).

This is due to the scroll bar being removed, and the viewport becoming a bit wider.

  • that will reset the scroll position – Angel David Calderaro Pacciott Aug 21 '18 at 6:13
  • @AngelDavidCalderaroPacciott No, the scroll position will remain the same height/distance. – Daan Aug 21 '18 at 7:31
1

Here is my solution to stop the scroll (no jQuery). I use it to disable the scroll when the side menu appears.

<button onClick="noscroll()" style="position:fixed; padding: 8px 16px;">Disable/Enable scroll</button>
<script>
var noscroll_var;
function noscroll(){
  if(noscroll_var){
    document.getElementsByTagName("html")[0].style.overflowY = "";
    document.body.style.paddingRight = "0";
    noscroll_var = false
  }else{
    document.getElementsByTagName("html")[0].setAttribute('style', 'overflow-y: hidden !important');
    document.body.style.paddingRight = "17px";
    noscroll_var = true
  }
}/*noscroll()*/
</script>

<!-- Just to fill the page -->
<script>
  for(var i=0; i <= 80; i++){
    document.write(i + "<hr>")
  }
</script>

I put 17px of padding-right to compensate for the disappearance of the scroll bar. But this is also problematic, mostly for mobile browsers. Solved by getting the bar width according to this.

All together in this Pen.

1

No, I wouldn't go with event handling because:

  • not all events are guaranteed to reach body,

  • selecting text and moving downwards actually scrolls the document,

  • if at the phase of event detaching sth goes wrong you are doomed.

I've bitten by this by making a copy-paste action with a hidden textarea and guess what, the page scroll whenever I make copy because internally I have to select the textarea before I call document.execCommand('copy').

Anyway that's the way I go, notice the setTimeout():

document.body.setAttribute('style','overflow:hidden;');
// do your thing...
setTimeout(function(){document.body.setAttribute('style','overflow:visible;');}, 500);

A momentum flashing exists as the scrollbars disappear momentarily but it's acceptable I thing.

0

I found this answer on another site:

Disable scroll:

$( ".popup").live({
    popupbeforeposition: function(event, ui) {
    $("body").on("touchmove", false);
}
});

After close popup release scroll:

$( ".popup" ).live({
    popupafterclose: function(event, ui) {
    $("body").unbind("touchmove");
}
});
  • That only seems to stop touch scrolling, but the mouse scrolling, arrow keys, page up and down keys, etc will still work. -1 – markasoftware Jul 22 '13 at 17:43
  • These 'events' are for touch scrolling, just substitute whatever events you need. – pennstump Jul 25 '13 at 19:40
  • 1
    also, this seems to be used in some other very specific situation. popupbeforeposition? What is that supposed to be for? What does this have to do with temporarily disabling scrolling? At least make it relevant to this situation. It looks like you copied this directly from a website. – markasoftware Jul 26 '13 at 6:19
0

galambalazs's solution is great! It worked perfectly for me in both Chrome and Firefox. And it also may be extended to prevent any default event from the browser window. Let's say you are doing an app on the canvas. You could do this:

var events = {
  preventDefault: function(e) {
    e = e || window.event;
    if (e.preventDefault) e.preventDefault();
    e.returnValue = false;  
  },

  //spacebar: 32, pageup: 33, pagedown: 34, end: 35, home: 36,
  //left: 37, up: 38, right: 39, down: 40
  keys: [32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40],
  keydown: function(e) {
    for (var i = events.keys.length; i--;) {
      if (e.keyCode === events.keys[i]) {
        events.preventDefault(e);
        return;
      }
    }
  },

  wheel: function(e) {
    events.preventDefault(e);
  },

  disable: function() {
    if (window.addEventListener) {
      window.addEventListener('DOMMouseScroll', events.wheel, false);
    }
    window.onmousewheel = document.onmousewheel = events.wheel;
    document.onkeydown = helpers.events.keydown;
  },

  enable: function() {
    if (window.removeEventListener) {
      window.removeEventListener('DOMMouseScroll', events.wheel, false);
    }
    window.onmousewheel = document.onmousewheel = document.onkeydown = null;  
  }
}

And then on your app let's say you're going to process your own events, like mouse, keyboard, touch events and so on... You could disable default events when the mouse goes inside the canvas and re-enable them when the mouse goes out:

function setMouseEvents(canvas) {
  var useCapture = false;

  //Mouse enter event
  canvas.addEventListener('mouseenter', function(event) {
    events.disable();
  }, useCapture);

  //Mouse leave event
  canvas.addEventListener('mouseleave', function(event) {
    events.enable();
  }, useCapture);
}

You could even disable right click menu with this hack:

function disableRightClickMenu(canvas) {
  var my_gradient = canvas.context.createLinearGradient(0, 0, 0, 225);
  my_gradient.addColorStop(0, "white");
  my_gradient.addColorStop(1, "white");
  canvas.context.fillStyle = my_gradient;
  canvas.context.fillRect(0, 0, canvas.width, canvas.height);
  canvas.oncontextmenu = function() { return false; };
}
0

I had a similar animation problem on mobile screens but not on laptops, when trying to animate a div using jquery's animate command. So I decided to use a timer that restored the window's scroll position so frequently that to a naked eye the document would appear static. This solution worked perfectly on a small screen mobile device like Samsung Galaxy-2 or iphone-5.

Main Logic of this approach: The timer to set window's scroll position to original scroll position should be started before the jquery animate command, and then when animation is completed we need to clear this timer (original scroll position is the position just before animation starts).

I found to my pleasant surprise that the document actually appeared static during the animation duration if the timer interval was 1 millisecond, which is what I was aiming for.

//get window scroll position prior to animation
//so we can keep this position during animation
var xPosition = window.scrollX || window.pageXOffset || document.body.scrollLeft;
var yPosition = window.scrollY || window.pageYOffset || document.body.scrollTop;

//NOTE:restoreTimer needs to be global variable
//start the restore timer
restoreTimer = setInterval(function() {
    window.scrollTo(xPosition, yPosition);
}, 1);

//animate the element emt
emt.animate({
    left: "toggle",
    top: "toggle",
    width: "toggle",
    height: "toggle"
}, 500, function() {
    //when animation completes, we stop the timer
    clearInterval(restoreTimer);
});

ANOTHER SOLUTION that worked: Based on the answer by Mohammad Anini under this post to enable/disable scrolling, I also found that a modified version of code as below worked.

//get current scroll position
var xPosition = window.scrollX || window.pageXOffset || document.body.scrollLeft;
var yPosition = window.scrollY || window.pageYOffset || document.body.scrollTop;

//disable scrolling
window.onscroll = function() {
    window.scrollTo(xPosition, yPosition);
};

//animate and enable scrolling when animation is completed
emt.animate({
    left: "toggle",
    top: "toggle",
    width: "toggle",
    height: "toggle"
}, 500, function() {
    //enable scrolling when animation is done
    window.onscroll = function() {};
});
0

A simple solution that worked for me (disabling window scrolling temporarily).

Based on this fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/dh834zgw/1/

the following snippet (using jquery) will disable the window scroll:

 var curScrollTop = $(window).scrollTop();
 $('html').toggleClass('noscroll').css('top', '-' + curScrollTop + 'px');

And in your css:

html.noscroll{
    position: fixed;
    width: 100%;
    top:0;
    left: 0;
    height: 100%;
    overflow-y: scroll !important;
    z-index: 10;
 }

Now when you remove the modal, don't forget to remove the noscroll class on the html tag:

$('html').toggleClass('noscroll');
0

Something I've just put together:

jsfiddle

document.onwheel = function(e) {
  // get the target element
  target = e.target;
  // the target element might be the children of the scrollable element
  // e.g., "li"s inside an "ul", "p"s inside a "div" etc.
  // we need to get the parent element and check if it is scrollable
  // if the parent isn't scrollable, we move up to the next parent
  while (target.scrollHeight <= target.clientHeight) {
    // while looping parents, we'll eventually reach document.body
    // since body doesn't have a parent, we need to exit the while loop
    if (target == document.body) {
      break;
    }
    target = target.parentElement;
  }
  // we want this behaviour on elements other than the body
  if (target != document.body) {
    // if the scrollbar is at the top and yet if it still tries to scroll up
    // we prevent the scrolling
    if (target.scrollTop <= 0 && e.deltaY < 0) {
      e.preventDefault();
    }
    // similarly, if the scrollbar is at the bottom and it still tries to scroll down
    // we prevent it
    else if (target.clientHeight + target.scrollTop >= target.scrollHeight && e.deltaY > 0) {
      e.preventDefault();
    }
  }
};
body {
  background: gainsboro;
}

#box {
  width: 300px;
  height: 600px;
  padding: 5px;
  border: 1px solid silver;
  margin: 50px auto;
  background: white;
  overflow: auto;
}
<div id="box">
  <p>
    Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor
    in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.
  </p>
  <p>
    Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor
    in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.
  </p>
  <p>
    Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor
    in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.
  </p>
  <p>
    Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor
    in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.
  </p>
</div>

0

You can block the spacebar scroll and hide the browser scrollbar:

$(document).keydown(function(event) {
    if (event.keyCode == 32) {
        return false;

    }
});

document.documentElement.style.overflow = 'hidden';
document.body.scroll = 'no';
  • 2
    Disabling space bar key is really a no-go solution – avalanche1 Apr 5 '17 at 18:04
0

My take on this issue also includes a concern with the body width, as the page seems to dance a little when we hide the scroll bar with overflow = "hidden". The following code works perfectly for me, and is based on an Angular approach.

element.bind('mouseenter', function() {
    var w = document.body.offsetWidth;
    document.body.style.overflow = 'hidden';
    document.body.style.width = w + 'px';
});

element.bind('mouseleave', function() {
    document.body.style.overflow = 'initial';
    document.body.style.width = 'auto';
});
0

I have similar issue on touch devices. Adding "touch-action: none" to the element resolved the issue.

For more information. Check this out:-

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/touch-action

0

This is the simplest solution I got so far. And believe me I tried all the others and this is the easiest one. It works great on Windows devices, which pushes the page from the right to have room for the system scrollbar and IOS devices which don't require space for their scrollbars in the browsers. So by using this you wont need to add padding on the right so the page doesn't flicker when you hide the overflow of the body or html with css.

The solution is pretty simple if you think about it. The idea is to give the window.scrollTop() the same exact position at the moment that a popup is opened. Also change that position when the window resizes ( as the scroll position changes once that happens ).

So here we go...

First lets create the variable that will let you know that the popup is open and call it stopWindowScroll. If we don't do this then you'll get an error of an undefined variable on your page and set it to 0 - as not active.

$(document).ready(function(){
    stopWindowScroll = 0;
});

Now lets make the open popup function witch can be any function in your code that triggers whatever popup you are using as a plugin or custom. In this case it will be a simple custom popup with a simple document on click function.

$(document).on('click','.open-popup', function(){
    // Saving the scroll position once opening the popup.
    stopWindowScrollPosition = $(window).scrollTop();
    // Setting the stopWindowScroll to 1 to know the popup is open.
    stopWindowScroll = 1;
    // Displaying your popup.
    $('.your-popup').fadeIn(300);
});

So the next thing we do is create the close popup function, which I repeat again can be any function you already have created or are using in a plugin. The important thing is that we need those 2 functions to set the stopWindowScroll variable to 1 or 0 to know when it's open or closed.

$(document).on('click','.open-popup', function(){
    // Setting the stopWindowScroll to 0 to know the popup is closed.
    stopWindowScroll = 0;
    // Hiding your popup
    $('.your-popup').fadeOut(300);
});

Then lets create the window.scroll function so we can prevent the scrolling once the stopWindowScroll mentioned above is set to 1 - as active.

$(window).scroll(function(){
    if(stopWindowScroll == 1) {
         // Giving the window scrollTop() function the position on which
         // the popup was opened, this way it will stay in its place.
         $(window).scrollTop(stopWindowScrollPosition);
    }
});

Thats it. No CSS required for this to work except your own styles for the page. This worked like a charm for me and I hope it helps you and others.

Here is a working example on JSFiddle:

JS Fiddle Example

Let me know if this helped. Regards.

0

Store scroll length in a global variable and restore it when needed!

var sctollTop_length = 0;

function scroll_pause(){
  sctollTop_length = $(window).scrollTop();
  $("body").css("overflow", "hidden");
}

function scroll_resume(){
  $("body").css("overflow", "auto");
  $(window).scrollTop(sctollTop_length);
}

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