1

for example:

s = <6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1>, s1 = <6, 4, 1>, s2 = <5, 2>, s3 = <5, 3, 2>

Given s as a sequence, s1 and s2 are the valid subsequences to be considered, but s3 is not because it contains a consecutive elements 3 and 2.

How do you find a longest such a subsequence so that it is monotonically decreasing in O(n^2)

I am aware of the version of the question that contains monotonic increase/ decrease.

But the additional condition here makes it difficult.

A trivial solution would be to start at i = n'th element as well as at j = (n-1)'th element, solve as if solving for longest monotonically decreasing subsequence with consideration that next element is at (i-2)'th and (j-2)'th respectively and compare the length of two at the end. This will still give the O(n^2), but does seem way too trivial.

Is there a better approach?

  • Your title says monotonically decreasing, but your body says monotonically non-decreasing. What are you looking for? – user2357112 supports Monica Dec 8 '17 at 2:50
  • oops.. corrected a typo! – Adorn Dec 8 '17 at 2:51
  • Your examples aren't monotonically decreasing, though. – user2357112 supports Monica Dec 8 '17 at 2:53
  • ...are you sure you know what "decrease" means? And why would "too trivial" be a reason to reject an algorithm that you think works? – user2357112 supports Monica Dec 8 '17 at 2:56
  • And why are you going for O(n^2) when standard algorithms for the longest increasing subsequence problem achieve O(n log n)? – user2357112 supports Monica Dec 8 '17 at 2:57
0
D[i] = max { D[j] + 1 | a[i] < a[j], j < i + 1 } U {1} 

Explanation: for each element a[i], your Dynamic Programming (DP) checks for all numbers that are before it and with lower value, but not adjacent - if the new number can be used to extend the best sequence. In addition, you have the option to start a new sequence (that's when the {1} comes to play).

Example: S = <6, 0, 5, 8, 4, 7, 6 >

D[1] = max { 1 } = 1  // sequence = <6>
D[2] = max {1} = 1  // sequence = <0>
D[3] = max {1, D[0] + 1 } = 2  // sequence = <6, 5>
D[4] = max {1} = 1  // sequence = <8>
D[5] = max{D[3] + 1, D[1] + 1, 1} = 3 // sequence = <6, 5, 4>
D[6] = max{D[4] + 1, 1} = 2  // sequence = <8, 7>
D[7] = max{D[4] + 1, 1} = 2  // sequence = <8, 6>

The algorithm runs in O(n^2), since calculating D[i] takes O(i) time. From sum of arithmetic progression, this sums to O(n^2) to calculate all.

When you are done calculating all D[.], you iterate through all of them, and find the maximal value. This is done in linear time.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.