1

in typescript 2.6 I want to write a function that does a null check. When I enable strict null-checks, typescript 2.6 complains about the following code. (Note that when using the null check directly works)

edited: corrected notNullOrUndefined since it didn't check for foo

interface A {
  foo: string | undefined;
}
const notNullOrUndefined = (a: A): boolean => {
  return a.foo != null;
}
const len = (a: A): number => {
  //if (a.foo != null) {
  if (notNullOrUndefined(a)){
    return a.foo.length;
  }
  return 0;
} 

here is the example to play with: example

What's the typescript way to solve this?

  • seems like you should check if both a and a.foo are null or undefined. Something like const len = (a: A): number => a && a.foo && a.foo.length || 0; – Slai Dec 8 '17 at 13:35
  • What if you use (a && a.foo != null) – nipuna777 Dec 8 '17 at 14:08
4

EDIT: updated to reflect fixing a typo in question: The question is a little confusing, since your notNullOrUndefined() doesn't check a.foo at all, so it's not surprising that those would be different.

Note that with --strictNullChecks on, you have defined len() so that the a parameter is an A, and therefore cannot be null or undefined. So you don't have to check a itself inside the len() function implementation; instead you need to make sure that anything you pass to len() is a valid A. So notNullOrUndefined() is kind of a bad name, since you're checking the foo value of the parameter, not the parameter itself. Feel free to change it to something like fooPropertyIsNotNull(); I will leave it for now.

The main issue here is that TypeScript recognizes that if (a.foo != null) { ... } is a type guard, and narrows a.foo to string inside the { ... } clause. But type guards do not propagate out of functions automatically, so TypeScript doesn't understand that notNullOrUndefined() itself acts as a type guard.

Luckily, this issue is common enough that TypeScript provides user-defined type guards: if you have a function that returns a boolean which narrows the type of one of its parameters, you can change the boolean return type to a type predicate, using the x is T syntax. Here it is for notNullOrUndefined():

const notNullOrUndefined = (a: A): a is { foo: string } => {
  return a.foo != null;
}

So the function signature says: if you pass in an A, it will return a boolean value. If it returns true, then the passed-in parameter is narrowed to { foo: string }. Now you will get no errors, as you wanted:

interface A {
  foo: string | undefined;
}
const notNullOrUndefined = (a: A): a is { foo: string } => {
  return a.foo != null; // checking a.foo
}
const len = (a: A): number => {
  if (notNullOrUndefined(a)){
    return a.foo.length; // okay
  }
  return 0;
} 

Hope that helps, good luck!

  • thanks...you exactly answered my question. I was playing around so much so I pasted a broken example...corrected that as well. While your solution solves my question, do you have any recommendation how this might scale when the object you check is nested? – oliver Dec 8 '17 at 14:30
  • The obvious answer is to check only the nested property and not the whole object (isDefined(a.foo.bar) instead of isFooBarDefined(a)). Otherwise you might want to have two interfaces, one with all the properties non-null, and the other with all properties nullable, like in this answer. There's no great solution right now without type guard propagation or conditional mapped types. – jcalz Dec 8 '17 at 14:37
0

You need to check both a and a.foo. This code, for example, will work even when strict null checking is not enabled:

const len = (a: A): number => {
  if (a != null && a.foo != null){
    return a.foo.length;
  }
  return 0;
} 

If you do have strict null checking enabled you already know that a is not undefined and then you can just use your commented out line:

const len = (a: A): number => {
  if (a.foo != null){
    return a.foo.length;
  }
  return 0;
} 

If you want to perform the test in a separate function then you should make that function a type assertion. You could for example remove the undefined from the type of foo but use Partial<A> anywhere that you don't know whether or not foo is present:

interface A {
  foo: string;
}
const notNullOrUndefined = (a: Partial<A>): a is A => {
  return a != null && a.foo != null;
}
const len = (a: Partial<A>): number => {
  if (notNullOrUndefined(a)){
    return a.foo.length;
  }
  return 0;
} 
0

This is why I hate strictNullChecks at the moment. It does not support typechecking from within a function to 'bubble up' to where the check is called at.

if (a && a.foo) {
   return a.foo.length;
}

works as expected. For me, wrapping the following in a function...

const hasFoo(a: A) => !!a && 'foo' in a && typeof a.foo === 'string';

...

if (hasFoo(a)) {
   return a.foo.length;
}

...

...should work as the initial check. However, this is not the case.

A solution (and afaik the only one) is to use the new !. postfix expression. This claims that the value is indeed declared as the expected type.

if (hasFoo(a))
{
   return a.foo!.length;
}
0

This code will check for null.

"use strict";

function isNull(something: any) {
    return something === null;
}

function checkForNull() {
    console.log(isNull(''));
    console.log(isNull(null));
    console.log(isNull(undefined));
}

checkForNull();

Output:

false
true
false
  • I know this checks for null...the question is how can I call a function that checks for null as a prerequisite and then access the potentially null fields so that typescript 2.6 does not complain – oliver Dec 8 '17 at 13:50
  • I guess I'm just not getting the question. I'm going to edit my answer, at least temporarily, to see if you can tell me what part of your question I'm missing. – Chris Sharp Dec 8 '17 at 14:05
  • The OP is asking about compile-time errors of TypeScript, not run-time behavior of the generated JavaScript. – jcalz Dec 8 '17 at 14:18
  • I'm still not understanding. Sorry. I get no compile errors at all with this code. I read your answer @jcalz and all I can see is that you can't set something to null during runtime so can't write code that tries to do it. I'm happy to remove the mountain of useless code I posted but I still would appreciate understanding what the question actually was. If you define a type you can't later assign it to null. Is there something else? – Chris Sharp Dec 8 '17 at 14:24
-1

You can directly use !! for null and undefined check.

interface A {
  foo: string | undefined;
}

//const notNullOrUndefined = (a: A): boolean => {
  //return a != null;
//}

const len = (a: A): number => {
  if (!!a.foo) {
  // if (notNullOrUndefined(a)){
    return a.foo.length;
  }
  return 0;
} 

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