6

My react app has 3 entry points with overlapping routes, and it is getting hard to maintain. 2 of the apps are basically just stuck in a couple places on the legacy site, until the main app has enough functionality to fully replace the main site.

I am using React router 4, and have a routes.tsx file with all my routes. But I would like to group the routes by function, and then have the routes component for each app just take what it needs.

Currently my routes look like this:

const MainAppRoutes: React.SFC = (): JSX.Element =>
{
    return (
        <Switch>
            <Route exact path='/' component={HomePage} />
            <Route path='/customers' component={CustomersDisplayPage} />
            <Route path='/customers/:id' component={CustomersDisplayPage} />
            <Route path='/cars' component={CarDisplayPage} />
            <Route path='/cars/:id' component={CarDisplayPage} />
        </Switch>
    );
};

But I would like it to look like this:

const MainAppRoutes: React.SFC = (): JSX.Element =>
{
    return (
        <Switch>
            <Route exact path='/' component={HomePage} />
            <CustomerAppRoutes />
            <CarAppRoutes />
        </Switch>
    );

const CustomerAppRoutes: React.SFC = (): JSX.Element =>
{
    return (
        <Switch>
            <Route path='/customers' component={CustomersDisplayPage} />
            <Route path='/customers/:id' component={CustomersDisplayPage} />
        </Switch>
    );
};

const CarAppRoutes: React.SFC = (): JSX.Element =>
{
    return (
        <Switch>
            <Route path='/cars' component={CarDisplayPage} />
            <Route path='/cars/:id' component={CarDisplayPage} />
        </Switch>
    );
};

But this causes Caroutes not to route properly. I have tried using Div's instead, and that does not work either.

5

In React 16, you can accomplish this with Fragments:

const MainAppRoutes: React.SFC = (): JSX.Element => (
    <Switch>
        <Route exact path='/' component={HomePage} />
        <CustomerAppRoutes />
        <CarAppRoutes />
    </Switch>
);

const CustomerAppRoutes: React.SFC = (): JSX.Element => (
    <>
        <Route path='/customers' component={CustomersDisplayPage} />
        <Route path='/customers/:id' component={CustomersDisplayPage} />
    </>
);

const CarAppRoutes: React.SFC = (): JSX.Element => (
    <>
        <Route path='/cars' component={CarDisplayPage} />
        <Route path='/cars/:id' component={CarDisplayPage} />
    </>
);
  • This actually didn't work for me. As soon as I added <CarAppRoutes/> to the MainAppRoutes, none of the routing worked. Even with just CustomerRoutes, it exhibited some odd behavior, in some cases it seems to render more than one route. – sheamus Dec 9 '17 at 7:04
  • 2 things: 1. What version of react are you using? The syntax might be slightly different for you. 2. Try adding exact to your /cars and /customers routes. The way they're set up now looks like they're capturing the :id paths. – Luke M Willis Dec 9 '17 at 17:04
  • 16.2 with Typescript. I will try exact, and see if that helps. – sheamus Dec 10 '17 at 1:31
  • Hmm, it could also be the types. Fragments might not be considered elements. I'd check there next if exact doesn't work. – Luke M Willis Dec 10 '17 at 7:22
  • @sheamus any updates? – Luke M Willis Dec 20 '17 at 22:55
3

You could barrel it in separate files and then map them in the main file

CustomerRoutes.js

import ...
export default [
    { path: '/customers', component: CustomersDisplayPage },
    { path: '/customers/:id', component: CustomersDisplayPage }
]

CarAppRoutes.js

import ...
export default [
    { path: '/cars', component: CarDisplayPage },
    { path: '/cars/:id', component: CarDisplayPage }
]

MainRoutes.js

import ...
import CarAppRoutes from 'wherever';
import CustomerRoutes from 'wherever';

...
<Switch>
    <Route exact path='/' component={HomePage} />
    { CustomerRoutes.map(props => <Route {...props} />) }
    { CarAppRoutes.map(props => <Route {...props} />) }
</Switch>
  • Yeah, I think that is basically what I did. Putting them in separate files really leaned out the sub apps, as web pack was able to strip out a bunch of the app that isn't needed for the Car and Customer specific app. I like using the {...props} though, I forgot about that. – sheamus Dec 9 '17 at 3:50
0

The solution I am currently using is to create arrays of routes:

//routes.tsx
import * as React from 'react';

export interface IRoute { path: string, component: React.ComponentClass, exact?: boolean }

const CarRoutes: IRoute[] = [
   { path: '/cars', component: {CarDisplayPage} },
   { path: '/cars/:id', component: {CarDisplayPage} },
];

const CustomerRoutes: IRoute[] = [
    { path: '/customers', component: {CustomerDisplayPage} },
    { path: '/customers/:id', component: {CustomerDisplayPage} },
];

const AppRouting: React.SFC = (): JSX.Element =>
{
    const routes = []
        .concat(CarRoutes)
        .concat(CustomerRoutes);
    return (
        <Switch>
            <Route exact path='/' component={HomePage} />
            {routes.map(r => <Route path={r.path} exact={r.exact===true} path={r.path} key={r.path} />)}
        </Switch>
    );
};

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