A number is divisible by 11 if its alternating sum of digits is divisible by 11.

So, e.g. if number is 1595, +1 -5 +9 -5 == 0, so 1595 is divisible by 11. How to implement such a sum? Here is my solution, but it's too complex and works only if the number of digits is even.

my $number = 1595;
say [+] $number.comb.map({$^a - $^b});

What's the best way to do it?

  • 1
    One nit about your solution (which I like, BTW): If the number would have an odd number of digits, it will fail with Too few positionals passed; expected 2 arguments but got 1. You can fix this by changing the signature to the block: say [+] "15956".comb.map(-> $a, $b = 0 {$a - $b}); # 6 – Elizabeth Mattijsen Dec 9 '17 at 9:55
  • @ElizabethMattijsen Thanks! I felt I should have given $^b a default value, but didn't know how to do it. – Eugene Barsky Dec 9 '17 at 10:17
  • @ElizabethMattijsen Then probably the following is a bit easier, since it doesn't require default. :) say [+] 15956.comb.kv.map({ $^b * (-1) ** $^a}) – Eugene Barsky Dec 9 '17 at 19:49
up vote 3 down vote accepted
say [+] 1595.comb >>*>> (1,-1)

Similar to the Z* version but using the hyper meta operator looping effect on the right hand side (if the left hand side has less than 2 digits you are fine).

  • Probably, that's the best solution! – Eugene Barsky Dec 12 '17 at 12:59
say [+] 1595.comb Z* (1, -1, 1 ... *)

To break it down: .comb returns a list of characters, and Z* multiplies that list element-wise with the sequence on the RHS.

This sequence is a geometric sequence, which the ... series operator can deduce from the the three elements. Since the zip operator Z stops at the shortest sequence, we don't have to take care to terminate the sequence on the RHS.

Another way to write the same thing is:

say [+] 1595.comb Z* (1, -* ... *)

Where -* is the explicit negation of the previous value, applied to the initial element to generate the next one.

You could also write that as

say [+] 1595.comb Z* (1, &prefix:<-> ... *)
  • Oh, I felt that there should be an elegant solution! Didn't know how to implement 1, -1, 1..., it's very useful! – Eugene Barsky Dec 8 '17 at 19:34

The cross that Moritz uses is interesting (and quite pleasing) but you can also take chunks of a list. This is close to what you were trying initially. I think you were going toward rotor:

my $number = 1595;
say  [+] $number.comb.rotor(2, :partial).map: { $^a.[0] - ($^a.[1] // 0) }

Notice that you get one argument to your block. That's the list. It's a bit ugly because the odd digit case makes $^a.[1] Nil which would give a warning.

Now that I've played with this a bit more I handle that with a signature so I can give $b a default. This is much better:

my $number = 1595;
say  [+] $number
    .comb
    .rotor(2, :partial)
    .map: -> ( $a, $b = 0 ) { $a - $b }

But you don't even need the rotor because the map will grab as many positional parameters as it needs (h/t to timotimo in the comments). This means you were really close and merely missed the signature:

my $number = 1595;
say  [+] $number
    .comb
    .map: -> ( $a, $b = 0 ) { $a - $b }

The solution you have in the comment doesn't quite work for the odd number of digits cases:

say [+] $number.comb.rotor(2, :partial).map({[-] $_});

And, I know this problem wasn't really about divisors but I'm quite pleased that Perl 6 has a "divisible by" operator, the %%:

$ perl6
> 121 %% 11
True
> 122 %% 11
False
> 1595 %% 11
True
> 1596 %% 11
False
  • Thanks, I didn't know about it! Then what about the following solution? say [+] $number.comb.rotor(2, :partial).map({[-] $_} – Eugene Barsky Dec 8 '17 at 22:13
  • Thanks! Yes, I was wrong: [-] (1) gives -1 (I was sure it would be 1). – Eugene Barsky Dec 9 '17 at 7:37
  • 2
    there is no need to use .rotor(2, :partial).map(($a, $b = 0) -> {}) here, just using .map(-> $a, $b = 0 { }) should behave the same way. – timotimo Dec 9 '17 at 16:03
  • @timotimo At least it was just for me to learn about the rotor. :) – Eugene Barsky Dec 9 '17 at 19:52
  • @briandfoy Here's my new variant, hope it's correct. say [+] 15956.comb.kv.map({ $^b * (-1) ** $^a}) – Eugene Barsky Dec 9 '17 at 19:53

Here's my solution.

say [+] 15956.comb.kv.map( (-1) ** * * * ); # 6

And a more explicit version.

say [+] 15956.comb.kv.map({ $^b * (-1) ** $^a }); # 6

UPD: Yet another solution.

say - [+] 15956.comb(2)>>.comb.map({[R-] $_}); # 6
  • 1
    💚 the math. Another more explicit version: say [+] 15956.comb.pairs».&{ (-1) ** .key * .value }. Whereas .kv returns a list of 2 element lists, .pairs returns a list of Pairs. Whereas .map lazily consumes the list on its left by passing N elements at a time to the operation on its right, » (>> in ASCII) eagerly consumes the list on its left by running the operation on its right on each single element in the list, doing so in parallel (on multiple cores, or a GPU, or using some other SIMD approach) if the compiler decides to do so. – raiph Dec 9 '17 at 22:39
  • @raiph Thanks! Could you please explain the meaning of .&? The link for .& in docs seems to be broken. There are some explanations here, but I will not pretend that I understand how it works. :) – Eugene Barsky Dec 10 '17 at 7:28
  • 2
    Frightfully wicked! – brian d foy Dec 10 '17 at 11:20
  • 1
    @EugeneBarsky The postfix . indicates a method call. The "inline method" is &{...}. This is a closure that will be passed a single argument, the invocant. The syntax is .&{...} rather than just .{...} because the latter is a hash subscript, the same as a postfix (actually postcircumfix) {...} without the .. The disambiguating character is & because the latter is the appropriate sigil (it indicates a routine). – raiph Dec 10 '17 at 21:30

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