6

In python, I have code that handles exceptions and prints error codes and messages.

try:
    somecode() #raises NameError
except Exception as e:
    print('Error! Code: {c}, Message, {m}'.format(c = e.code, m = str(e))

However, e.code is not the proper way to get the error name (NameError), and I cannot find the answer to this. How am I supossed to get the error code?

  • 2
    Error code (whatever this means) or error name? For the latter, try type(e).__name__ – Michael Butscher Dec 9 '17 at 0:21
  • 1
    what about e.message – user1767754 Dec 9 '17 at 0:21
  • 1
    Did you look at the Python documentation for the Exception class? – OneCricketeer Dec 9 '17 at 0:23
  • 1
    use print( dir(e) ) to see what fields you have in e. Every exception may have different fields. – furas Dec 9 '17 at 0:23
-1

Try this:

try:
    somecode() #raises NameError
except Exception as e:
    print('Error! Code: {c}, Message, {m}'.format(c = type(e).__name__, m = str(e)))

Read this for a more detailed explanation.

  • 5
    This does not print the error code, only the name of the exception NameError and the exception's message – Hamman Samuel Oct 7 '18 at 11:19
  • 3
    Mods: this should not be marked as the correct answer as it does not answer the question. – rjurney Jan 21 '20 at 19:52
  • See my answer for (what I believe to be) the correct one. – François M. Nov 13 '20 at 3:03
1

Your question is unclear, but from what I understand, you do not want to find the name of the error (NameError), but the error code. Here is how to do it. First, run this:

try:
    # here, run some version of your code that you know will fail, for instance:
    this_variable_does_not_exist_so_this_code_will_fail
except Exception as e:
    print(dir(e))

You can now see what is in e. You will get something like this:

['__cause__', '__class__', '__context__', '__delattr__', '__dict__', '__dir__', '__doc__', '__eq__', '__format__', '__ge__', '__getattribute__', '__gt__', '__hash__', '__init__', '__init_subclass__', '__le__', '__lt__', '__ne__', '__new__', '__reduce__', '__reduce_ex__', '__repr__', '__setattr__', '__setstate__', '__sizeof__', '__str__', '__subclasshook__', '__suppress_context__', '__traceback__', 'args', 'with_traceback']

This list will include special methods (__x__ stuff), but will end with things without underscores. You can try them one by one to find what you want, like this:

try:
    # here, run some version of your code that you know will fail, for instance:
    this_variable_does_not_exist_so_this_code_will_fail
except Exception as e:
    print(e.args)
    print(e.with_traceback)

In the case of this specific error, print(e.args) is the closest you'll get to an error code, it will output ("name 'this_variable_does_not_exist_so_this_code_will_fail' is not defined",).

In this case, there is only two things to try, but in your case, your error might have more. For example, in my case, a Tweepy error, the list was:

['__cause__', '__class__', '__context__', '__delattr__', '__dict__', '__dir__', '__doc__', '__eq__', '__format__', '__ge__', '__getattribute__', '__gt__', '__hash__', '__init__', '__init_subclass__', '__le__', '__lt__', '__module__', '__ne__', '__new__', '__reduce__', '__reduce_ex__', '__repr__', '__setattr__', '__setstate__', '__sizeof__', '__str__', '__subclasshook__', '__suppress_context__', '__traceback__', '__weakref__', 'api_code', 'args', 'reason', 'response', 'with_traceback']

I tried the last five one by one. From print(e.args), I got ([{'code': 187, 'message': 'Status is a duplicate.'}],), and from print(e.api_code), I got 187. So I figured out that either e.args[0][0]["code"] or e.api_code would give me the error code I'm searching for.

0

Python exceptions do not have "codes".

You can create a custom exception that does have a property called code and then you can access it and print it as desired.

This answer has an example of adding a code property to a custom exception.

0

Since it return the object of tuple of tuple of dictionary, we can extract the code as

try:
  
  pass

except Exception as e:

  print(e[0][0]['code'] + e[0][0]['message'])

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