5

These are my models:

public class Company
{
   public int CompanyId { get; set; }
   public string Name { get; set; }
   public string Address { get; set; }
   public string Email { get; set; }
   public string Url { get; set; }
   //...
}

public class HeadOffice : Company
{
   public int HeadOfficeId { get; set; }
   public virtual List<BranchOffice> BranchOffice { get; set; } = new List<BranchOffice>();
}

public class BranchOffice : Company
{
   public int BranchOfficeId { get; set; }
   public virtual HeadOffice HeadOffice { get; set; }
}

I wanted the following database structure:

Table Company

  • CompanyId (PK)
  • Name
  • Address
  • Email
  • Url

Table HeadOffice

  • HeadOfficeId (PK)
  • CompanyId (FK)

Table BranchOffice

  • BranchOfficeId (PK)
  • HeadOfficeId (FK)
  • CompanyId (FK)

How can I do this?

When I create this migration, the EF creates just one table, with all columns! I don't want this approach!

  • 1
    First, what you are describing is TPT (Table per Type). While what you get is TPH (Table per Hierarchy). Second, it doesn't matter what you want because EF Core currently supports only TPH - you should have checked that before deciding to use EF Core. – Ivan Stoev Dec 9 '17 at 21:09
  • it is true. I'm sorry, I already edited for TPT. I thought that in version 2.0, this implementation had already been done. – Bruno Henri Dec 9 '17 at 21:14
  • But you can get what you want by changing the definition of HeadOffice and BranchOffice to use a reference to Company rather than inheritance. If you then have other code that needs to be able to work with collections of Company objects that could be HeadOffices or BranchOffices, you could provide separate wrapper classes for that purpose. – Dylan Nicholson Dec 9 '17 at 21:15
  • 1
    Yeah, Unfortunately TPT is not supported in EF Core 2.0. @DylanNicholson Would you find posting a code example of what you are talking about? – JohnOsborne Apr 2 '18 at 19:51
  • Update: TPT will be supported in EfCore 5.0. It's not yet available in preview, but the efcore team will probably have finished TPT development in preview 8 – Pieterjan Jul 14 at 9:00
4

You would have to change your Model to look like this, note that you can't use inheritance using this approach:

public class Company
{
   public int CompanyId { get; set; }
   //...
}

public class Company
{
   public int CompanyId { get; set; }
   public string Name { get; set; }
   //...
}

public class HeadOffice
{
   [ForeignKey(nameof(Company))]
   public int CompanyId { get; set; }
   public Company Company { get; set; }
   // Add Properties here
}

public class BranchOffice
{
   [ForeignKey(nameof(Company))]
   public int CompanyId { get; set; }
   public Company Company { get; set; }
   // Add Properties here
}

Your DbContext:

public class YourContext : DbContext
{
  public DbSet<Company> Companys { get; set; }
  public DbSet<HeadOffice> HeadOffices { get; set; }
  public DbSet<BranchOffice> BranchOffices { get; set; }

  public YourContext(DbContextOptions<YourContext> options)
    : base(options)
  {
  }
}

You could then use EF Core Migrations. The command would look somewhat like this:

dotnet ef migrations add Initial_TPT_Migration -p ./../../ModelProject.csproj -s ./../../ModelProject.csproj -c YourContext -o ./TptModel/CodeFirst/Migrations

It generats a Class Initial_TPT_Migration that contains methods to generate your database.

Usage

To query you would need to map Company Properties to the fieldnames. If you combine this with the Repository Pattern (link), it could actually be as convenient as the default approach in EF Core currently is to use.

YourContext ctx = ...

// Fetch all BranchOffices
var branchOffices = ctx.BranchOffices
          .Select(c => new BranchOffice()
                  {
                    CompanyId = c.CompanyId,
                    Name = c.Company.Name,
                  })
          .ToList();

You can find more informations about this approach here.

| improve this answer | |
  • Did you use this approach now? How well is it working? – LuckyLikey Jan 7 '19 at 5:55
-2

You can find an answer here https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/data/ef-mvc/inheritance?view=aspnetcore-2.1

Also check this topic out if you need many inherited classes against one table https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/ef/core/modeling/relational/inheritance

Copying the code here just in case microsoft used to mess with urls and docs

  1. Each inherited type per table
public class SchoolContext : DbContext
{
    public SchoolContext(DbContextOptions<SchoolContext> options) : base(options)
    {
    }

    public DbSet<Student> Students { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Instructor> Instructors { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Person> People { get; set; }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder b)
    {
        b.Entity<Student>().ToTable("Student");
        b.Entity<Instructor>().ToTable("Instructor");
        b.Entity<Person>().ToTable("Person");
    }
}

public abstract class Person
{
    public int ID { get; set; }

    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public string FirstMidName { get; set; }
}

public class Instructor : Person
{
    public DateTime HireDate { get; set; }
}

public class Student : Person
{
    public DateTime EnrollmentDate { get; set; }
}
  1. Many inherited types in one table
public class MyContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Blog> Blogs { get; set; }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        modelBuilder.Entity<Blog>()
            .HasDiscriminator<string>("blog_type")
            .HasValue<Blog>("blog_base")
            .HasValue<RssBlog>("blog_rss");
    }
}

public class Blog
{
    public int BlogId { get; set; }
    public string Url { get; set; }
}

public class RssBlog : Blog
{
    public string RssUrl { get; set; }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Even if it lacks Migrations, it does solve the problem to get TPT instead of TPH, without loosing the inheritance structure. Helped me, thanks. – LaWi Jul 14 at 16:10
  • Use TPH, EF6.3+ or wait .net core 5. It doesn't work with .net core 3.1 and EF 3.1. PMC gives the following error: The entity type 'X' cannot be mapped to a table because it is derived from 'Y'. Only base entity types can be mapped to a table. The running command stopped because the preference variable "ErrorActionPreference" or common parameter is set to Stop: The input object cannot be bound to any parameters for the command either because the command does not take pipeline input or the input and its properties do not match any of the parameters that take pipeline input. – richardsonwtr Jul 22 at 13:24

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