63

While preparing for tech interview I stumbled upon this interesting question:

You've been given an array that is sorted and then rotated.

example

Let arr = [1,2,3,4,5] which is sorted and then rotated say twice to the right to give

[4,5,1,2,3]

Now how best can one search in this sorted + rotated array ?

One can unrotate the array and then do a binary search. But it is no better than doing a linear search in the input array as both are worst case O(N).

Please provide some pointers. I've googled a lot on special algorithms for this but couldn't find any.

I understand c and c++

  • 6
    If this is homework, please add the homework tag. That would encourage people to give you gentle nudges into the right direction, instead of posting pastable answers. – sbi Jan 23 '11 at 12:40
  • 3
    Do you know how many times the array was rotated ? – Yochai Timmer Jan 23 '11 at 12:41
  • 2
    For an array of that size, you don't need to worry at all. What's your real problem? – sbi Jan 23 '11 at 12:42
  • 2
    No it's not homework. I don't know the number of rotations. And the example was kept simple. The array can have millions of elements. – Jones Jan 23 '11 at 12:48
  • Does the array always have sequential values starting from 1? Or can it have anything (including duplicates)? – The Archetypal Paul Jan 23 '11 at 12:51

19 Answers 19

150

This can be done in O(logN) using a slightly modified binary search.

The interesting property of a sorted + rotated array is that when you divide it into two halves, atleast one of the two halves will always be sorted.

Let input array arr = [4,5,6,7,8,9,1,2,3]
number of elements  = 9
mid index = (0+8)/2 = 4

[4,5,6,7,8,9,1,2,3]
         ^
 left   mid  right

as seem right sub-array is not sorted while left sub-array is sorted.

If mid happens to be the point of rotation them both left and right sub-arrays will be sorted.

[6,7,8,9,1,2,3,4,5]
         ^

But in any case one half(sub-array) must be sorted.

We can easily know which half is sorted by comparing start and end element of each half.

Once we find which half is sorted we can see if the key is present in that half - simple comparison with the extremes.

If the key is present in that half we recursively call the function on that half
else we recursively call our search on the other half.

We are discarding one half of the array in each call which makes this algorithm O(logN).

Pseudo code:

function search( arr[], key, low, high)

        mid = (low + high) / 2

        // key not present
        if(low > high)
                return -1

        // key found
        if(arr[mid] == key)
                return mid

        // if left half is sorted.
        if(arr[low] <= arr[mid])

                // if key is present in left half.
                if (arr[low] <= key && arr[mid] >= key) 
                        return search(arr,key,low,mid-1)

                // if key is not present in left half..search right half.
                else                 
                        return search(arr,key,mid+1,high)
                end-if

        // if right half is sorted. 
        else    
                // if key is present in right half.
                if(arr[mid] <= key && arr[high] >= key) 
                        return search(arr,key,mid+1,high)

                // if key is not present in right half..search in left half.
                else
                        return search(arr,key,low,mid-1)
                end-if
        end-if  

end-function

The key here is that one sub-array will always be sorted, using which we can discard one half of the array.

  • 2
    Thnanks codeaddict for clear explanation. – Jones Jan 23 '11 at 13:27
  • 6
    Good Explanation :) – Arihant Nahata Aug 24 '11 at 8:48
  • 3
    Simple. Concise. Examples. FTW !! – Ashwin May 1 '13 at 19:04
  • 3
    would not work for duplicate elements. But nice solution. – Trying Jul 20 '13 at 23:13
  • 1
    What should be the change in the solution to accommodate the duplicates as this does not woks for array with duplicates like searching "15" in {10, 15, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10} ? – Shadab Ansari Jul 27 '16 at 19:18
15

You can do 2 binary searches: first to find the index i such that arr[i] > arr[i+1].

Apparently, (arr\[1], arr[2], ..., arr[i]) and (arr[i+1], arr[i+2], ..., arr[n]) are both sorted arrays.

Then if arr[1] <= x <= arr[i], you do binary search at the first array, else at the second.

The complexity O(logN)

EDIT: the code.

  • Thanks max but I don't understand how will you apply your first BS? – Jones Jan 23 '11 at 12:53
  • I mean what will be your search key ? – Jones Jan 23 '11 at 12:53
  • @Jones, it is easier to write code then to explain. I edited answer, look for the link. – Max Jan 23 '11 at 13:22
  • 3
    Why do you have to search explicitely for the "breaking point"? Why don't use a modified binary search directly to search the element and in the same time to check for "anomalies"? – ruslik Jan 23 '11 at 15:03
12

The accepted answer has a bug when there are duplicate elements in the array. For example, arr = {2,3,2,2,2} and 3 is what we are looking for. Then the program in the accepted answer will return -1 instead of 1.

This interview question is discussed in detail in the book 'Cracking the Coding Interview'. The condition of duplicate elements is specially discussed in that book. Since the op said in a comment that array elements can be anything, I am giving my solution as pseudo code in below:

function search( arr[], key, low, high)

    if(low > high)
        return -1

    mid = (low + high) / 2

    if(arr[mid] == key)
        return mid

    // if the left half is sorted.
    if(arr[low] < arr[mid]) {

        // if key is in the left half
        if (arr[low] <= key && key <= arr[mid]) 
            // search the left half
            return search(arr,key,low,mid-1)
        else
            // search the right half                 
            return search(arr,key,mid+1,high)
        end-if

    // if the right half is sorted. 
    else if(arr[mid] < arr[low])    
        // if the key is in the right half.
        if(arr[mid] <= key && arr[high] >= key) 
            return search(arr,key,mid+1,high)
        else
            return search(arr,key,low,mid-1)
        end-if

    else if(arr[mid] == arr[low])

        if(arr[mid] != arr[high])
            // Then elements in left half must be identical. 
            // Because if not, then it's impossible to have either arr[mid] < arr[high] or arr[mid] > arr[high]
            // Then we only need to search the right half.
            return search(arr, mid+1, high, key)
        else 
            // arr[low] = arr[mid] = arr[high], we have to search both halves.
            result = search(arr, low, mid-1, key)
            if(result == -1)
                return search(arr, mid+1, high, key)
            else
                return result
   end-if
end-function
  • 2
    I think you're the only one who considered repeated elements properly. But your approach doesn't guarantee logarithmic complexity. Especially on an input such as 5,5,5,5,5,5, ... (lots of fixes), 5,1, 5 – Tomato Feb 20 '15 at 9:31
8

My first attempt would be to find using binary search the number of rotations applied - this can be done by finding the index n where a[n] > a[n + 1] using the usual binary search mechanism. Then do a regular binary search while rotating all indexes per shift found.

  • What will be your search key when doing a BS to find number of rot ? – Jones Jan 23 '11 at 12:54
  • 2
    @Jones: it would be a modified binary search. You're looking for a point at which two adjacent values decrease. Guess an index. If the value at that index is greater than the first value in the array then keep looking on the right hand side of your guess. If it's less, keep looking on the left. But codaddict's answer is better if you don't actually care where the discontinuity is, you just want to perform a search. – Steve Jessop Jan 23 '11 at 13:19
5
int rotated_binary_search(int A[], int N, int key) {
  int L = 0;
  int R = N - 1;

  while (L <= R) {
    // Avoid overflow, same as M=(L+R)/2
    int M = L + ((R - L) / 2);
    if (A[M] == key) return M;

    // the bottom half is sorted
    if (A[L] <= A[M]) {
      if (A[L] <= key && key < A[M])
        R = M - 1;
      else
        L = M + 1;
    }
    // the upper half is sorted
    else {
      if (A[M] < key && key <= A[R])
        L = M + 1;
      else
        R = M - 1;
    }
  }
  return -1;
}
  • As mentioned above, this won't handle the case of duplicate entries. However, if elements are unique, this is a very simple code since it doesn't do any recursion. – kaushal Jul 3 '16 at 16:13
3

If you know that the array has been rotated s to the right, you can simply do a binary search shifted s to the right. This is O(lg N)

By this, I mean, initialize the left limit to s and the right to (s-1) mod N, and do a binary search between these, taking a bit of care to work in the correct area.

If you don't know how much the array has been rotated by, you can determine how big the rotation is using a binary search, which is O(lg N), then do a shifted binary search, O(lg N), a grand total of O(lg N) still.

2

If you know how (far) it was rotated you can still do a binary search.

The trick is that you get two levels of indices: you do the b.s. in a virtual 0..n-1 range and then un-rotate them when actually looking up a value.

2

you don't need to rotate the array first, you can use binary search on the rotated array (with some modifications)

assume N is the number you search for:

read the first number (arr[start]) and the number in the middle of the array (arr[end]):

  • if arr[start] > arr[end] --> the first half is not sorted but the second half is sorted:

    • if arr[end] > N --> the number is in index: (middle + N - arr[end])

    • if N repeat the search on the first part of the array (see end to be the middle of the first half of the array etc.)

(the same if the first part is sorted but the second one isn't)

2

Reply for the above mentioned post "This interview question is discussed in detail in the book 'Cracking the Coding Interview'. The condition of duplicate elements is specially discussed in that book. Since the op said in comment that array elements can be anything, I am giving my solution as pseudo code in below:"

Your solution is O(n) !! (The last if condition where you check both halves of the array for a single condition makes it a sol of linear time complexity )

I am better off doing a linear search than getting stuck in a maze of bugs and segmentation faults during a coding round.

I dont think there is a better solution than O(n) for a search in a rotated sorted array (with duplicates)

1
public class PivotedArray {

//56784321 first increasing than decreasing
public static void main(String[] args) {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    int [] data ={5,6,7,8,4,3,2,1,0,-1,-2};

    System.out.println(findNumber(data, 0, data.length-1,-2));

}

static int findNumber(int data[], int start, int end,int numberToFind){

    if(data[start] == numberToFind){
        return start;
    }

    if(data[end] == numberToFind){
        return end;
    }
    int mid = (start+end)/2;
    if(data[mid] == numberToFind){
        return mid;
    }
    int idx = -1;
    int midData = data[mid];
    if(numberToFind < midData){
        if(midData > data[mid+1]){
            idx=findNumber(data, mid+1, end, numberToFind);
        }else{
            idx =  findNumber(data, start, mid-1, numberToFind);
        }
    }

    if(numberToFind > midData){
        if(midData > data[mid+1]){
            idx =  findNumber(data, start, mid-1, numberToFind);

        }else{
            idx=findNumber(data, mid+1, end, numberToFind);
        }
    }
    return idx;
}

}
1
short mod_binary_search( int m, int *arr, short start, short end)
{

 if(start <= end)
 {
    short mid = (start+end)/2;

    if( m == arr[mid])
        return mid;
    else
    {
        //First half is sorted
        if(arr[start] <= arr[mid])
        {
            if(m < arr[mid] && m >= arr[start])
                return mod_binary_search( m, arr, start, mid-1);
            return mod_binary_search( m, arr, mid+1, end);
        }

        //Second half is sorted
        else
        {
            if(m > arr[mid] && m < arr[start])
                return mod_binary_search( m, arr, mid+1, end);
            return mod_binary_search( m, arr, start, mid-1);
        }
    }
 }
 return -1;
}
1

First, you need to find the shift constant, k. This can be done in O(lgN) time. From the constant shift k, you can easily find the element you're looking for using a binary search with the constant k. The augmented binary search also takes O(lgN) time The total run time is O(lgN + lgN) = O(lgN)

To find the constant shift, k. You just have to look for the minimum value in the array. The index of the minimum value of the array tells you the constant shift. Consider the sorted array [1,2,3,4,5].

The possible shifts are:
    [1,2,3,4,5] // k = 0
    [5,1,2,3,4] // k = 1
    [4,5,1,2,3] // k = 2
    [3,4,5,1,2] // k = 3
    [2,3,4,5,1] // k = 4
    [1,2,3,4,5] // k = 5%5 = 0 

To do any algorithm in O(lgN) time, the key is to always find ways to divide the problem by half. Once doing so, the rest of the implementation details is easy

Below is the code in C++ for the algorithm

// This implementation takes O(logN) time
// This function returns the amount of shift of the sorted array, which is
// equivalent to the index of the minimum element of the shifted sorted array. 
#include <vector> 
#include <iostream> 
using namespace std; 

int binarySearchFindK(vector<int>& nums, int begin, int end)
{
    int mid = ((end + begin)/2); 
    // Base cases
    if((mid > begin && nums[mid] < nums[mid-1]) || (mid == begin && nums[mid] <= nums[end]))     
        return mid; 
    // General case 
    if (nums[mid] > nums[end]) 
    {
        begin = mid+1; 
        return binarySearchFindK(nums, begin, end); 
    }
    else
    {
        end = mid -1; 
        return binarySearchFindK(nums, begin, end); 
    }   
}  
int getPivot(vector<int>& nums)
{
    if( nums.size() == 0) return -1; 
    int result = binarySearchFindK(nums, 0, nums.size()-1); 
    return result; 
}

// Once you execute the above, you will know the shift k, 
// you can easily search for the element you need implementing the bottom 

int binarySearchSearch(vector<int>& nums, int begin, int end, int target, int pivot)
{
    if (begin > end) return -1; 
    int mid = (begin+end)/2;
    int n = nums.size();  
    if (n <= 0) return -1; 

    while(begin <= end)
    {
        mid = (begin+end)/2; 
        int midFix = (mid+pivot) % n; 
        if(nums[midFix] == target) 
        {
            return midFix; 
        }
        else if (nums[midFix] < target)
        {
            begin = mid+1; 
        }
        else
        {
            end = mid - 1; 
        }
    }
    return -1; 
}
int search(vector<int>& nums, int target) {
    int pivot = getPivot(nums); 
    int begin = 0; 
    int end = nums.size() - 1; 
    int result = binarySearchSearch(nums, begin, end, target, pivot); 
    return result; 
}
Hope this helps!=)
Soon Chee Loong, 
University of Toronto 
0

Here is a simple (time,space)efficient non-recursive O(log n) python solution that doesn't modify the original array. Chops down the rotated array in half until I only have two indices to check and returns the correct answer if one index matches.

def findInRotatedArray(array, num):

lo,hi = 0, len(array)-1
ix = None


while True:


    if hi - lo <= 1:#Im down to two indices to check by now
        if (array[hi] == num):  ix = hi
        elif (array[lo] == num): ix = lo
        else: ix = None
        break

    mid = lo + (hi - lo)/2
    print lo, mid, hi

    #If top half is sorted and number is in between
    if array[hi] >= array[mid] and num >= array[mid] and num <= array[hi]:
        lo = mid

    #If bottom half is sorted and number is in between
    elif array[mid] >= array[lo] and num >= array[lo] and num <= array[mid]:
        hi = mid


    #If top half is rotated I know I need to keep cutting the array down
    elif array[hi] <= array[mid]:
        lo = mid

    #If bottom half is rotated I know I need to keep cutting down
    elif array[mid] <= array[lo]:
        hi = mid

print "Index", ix
0

Another approach that would work with repeated values is to find the rotation and then do a regular binary search applying the rotation whenever we access the array.

test = [3, 4, 5, 1, 2]
test1 = [2, 3, 2, 2, 2]

def find_rotated(col, num):
    pivot = find_pivot(col)
    return bin_search(col, 0, len(col), pivot, num)

def find_pivot(col):
    prev = col[-1]
    for n, curr in enumerate(col):
        if prev > curr:
            return n
        prev = curr
    raise Exception("Col does not seem like rotated array")

def rotate_index(col, pivot, position):
    return (pivot + position) % len(col)

def bin_search(col, low, high, pivot, num):
    if low > high:
        return None
    mid = (low + high) / 2
    rotated_mid = rotate_index(col, pivot, mid)
    val = col[rotated_mid]
    if (val == num):
        return rotated_mid
    elif (num > val):
        return bin_search(col, mid + 1, high, pivot, num)
    else:
        return bin_search(col, low, mid - 1,  pivot, num)

print(find_rotated(test, 2))
print(find_rotated(test, 4))
print(find_rotated(test1, 3))
0

Try this solution

bool search(int *a, int length, int key)
{
int pivot( length / 2 ), lewy(0), prawy(length);
if (key > a[length - 1] || key < a[0]) return false;
while (lewy <= prawy){
    if (key == a[pivot]) return true;
    if (key > a[pivot]){
        lewy = pivot;
        pivot += (prawy - lewy) / 2 ? (prawy - lewy) / 2:1;}
    else{
        prawy = pivot;
        pivot -= (prawy - lewy) / 2 ? (prawy - lewy) / 2:1;}}
return false;
}
0

For a rotated array with duplicates, if one needs to find the first occurrence of an element, one can use the procedure below (Java code):

public int mBinarySearch(int[] array, int low, int high, int key)
{
    if (low > high)
        return -1; //key not present

    int mid = (low + high)/2;

    if (array[mid] == key)
        if (mid > 0 && array[mid-1] != key)
            return mid;

    if (array[low] <= array[mid]) //left half is sorted
    {
        if (array[low] <= key && array[mid] >= key)
            return mBinarySearch(array, low, mid-1, key);
        else //search right half
            return mBinarySearch(array, mid+1, high, key);
    }
    else //right half is sorted
    {
        if (array[mid] <= key && array[high] >= key)
            return mBinarySearch(array, mid+1, high, key);
        else
            return mBinarySearch(array, low, mid-1, key);
    }       

}

This is an improvement to codaddict's procedure above. Notice the additional if condition as below:

if (mid > 0 && array[mid-1] != key)
0

My simple code :-

public int search(int[] nums, int target) {
    int l = 0;
    int r = nums.length-1;
    while(l<=r){
        int mid = (l+r)>>1;
        if(nums[mid]==target){
            return mid;
        }
        if(nums[mid]> nums[r]){
            if(target > nums[mid] || nums[r]>= target)l = mid+1;
            else r = mid-1;
        }
        else{
            if(target <= nums[r] && target > nums[mid]) l = mid+1;
            else r = mid -1;
        }
    }
    return -1;
}

Time Complexity O(log(N)).

0

This code in C++ should work for all cases, Although It works with duplicates, please let me know if there's bug in this code.

#include "bits/stdc++.h"
using namespace std;
int searchOnRotated(vector<int> &arr, int low, int high, int k) {

    if(low > high)
        return -1;

    if(arr[low] <= arr[high]) {

        int p = lower_bound(arr.begin()+low, arr.begin()+high, k) - arr.begin();
        if(p == (low-high)+1)
            return -1;
        else
            return p; 
    }

    int mid = (low+high)/2;

    if(arr[low] <= arr[mid]) {

        if(k <= arr[mid] && k >= arr[low])
            return searchOnRotated(arr, low, mid, k);
        else
            return searchOnRotated(arr, mid+1, high, k);
    }
    else {

        if(k <= arr[high] && k >= arr[mid+1])
            return searchOnRotated(arr, mid+1, high, k);
        else
            return searchOnRotated(arr, low, mid, k);
    }
}
int main() {

    int n, k; cin >> n >> k;
    vector<int> arr(n);
    for(int i=0; i<n; i++) cin >> arr[i];
    int p = searchOnRotated(arr, 0, n-1, k);
    cout<<p<<"\n";
    return 0;
}
0

Question: Search in Rotated Sorted Array

public class SearchingInARotatedSortedARRAY {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int[] a = { 4, 5, 6, 0, 1, 2, 3 };

        System.out.println(search1(a, 6));

    }

    private static int search1(int[] a, int target) {
        int start = 0;
        int last = a.length - 1;
        while (start + 1 < last) {
            int mid = start + (last - start) / 2;

            if (a[mid] == target)
                return mid;
            // if(a[start] < a[mid]) => Then this part of the array is not rotated
            if (a[start] < a[mid]) {
                if (a[start] <= target && target <= a[mid]) {
                    last = mid;
                } else {
                    start = mid;
                }
            }
            // this part of the array is rotated
            else {
                if (a[mid] <= target && target <= a[last]) {
                    start = mid;
                } else {
                    last = mid;
                }
            }
        } // while
        if (a[start] == target) {
            return start;
        }
        if (a[last] == target) {
            return last;
        }
        return -1;
    }
}

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