9

I have an image that I generate programmatically and I want to send this image as a texture to a compute shader. The way I generate this image is that I calculate each of the RGBA components as UInt8 values, and combine them into a UInt32 and store it in the buffer of the image. I do this with the following piece of code:

guard let cgContext = CGContext(data: nil,
                                width: width,
                                height: height,
                                bitsPerComponent: 8,
                                bytesPerRow: 0,
                                space: CGColorSpaceCreateDeviceRGB(),
                                bitmapInfo: RGBA32.bitmapInfo) else {
                                  print("Unable to create CGContext")
                                  return
}

guard let buffer = cgContext.data else {
  print("Unable to create textures")
  return
}
let pixelBuffer = buffer.bindMemory(to: RGBA32.self, capacity: width * height)
let heightFloat = Float(height)
let widthFloat = Float(width)
for i in 0 ..< height {
  let latitude = Float(i + 1) / heightFloat
  for j in 0 ..< width {
    let longitude = Float(j + 1) / widthFloat
    let x = UInt8(((sin(longitude * Float.pi * 2) * cos(latitude * Float.pi) + 1) / 2) * 255)
    let y = UInt8(((sin(longitude * Float.pi * 2) * sin(latitude * Float.pi) + 1) / 2) * 255)
    let z = UInt8(((cos(latitude * Float.pi) + 1) / 2) * 255)
    let offset = width * i + j
    pixelBuffer[offset] = RGBA32(red: x, green: y, blue: z, alpha: 255)
  }
}

let coordinateConversionImage = cgContext.makeImage()

where RGBA32 is a little struct that does the shifting and creating the UInt32 value. This image turns out fine as I can convert it to UIImage and save it to my photos library.

The problem arises when I try to send this image as a texture to a compute shader. Below is my shader code:

kernel void updateEnvironmentMap(texture2d<uint, access::read> currentFrameTexture [[texture(0)]],
                                 texture2d<uint, access::read> coordinateConversionTexture [[texture(1)]],
                                 texture2d<uint, access::write> environmentMap [[texture(2)]]
                                 uint2 gid [[thread_position_in_grid]])
{
  const uint4 pixel = {255, 127, 63, 255};
  environmentMap.write(pixel, gid);
}

The problem with this code is that the type of my textures is uint, which is 32-bits, and I want to generate 32-bit pixels the same way I do on the CPU, by appending 4 8-bit values. However, I can't seem to do that on Metal as there is no byte type that I can just append together and make up a uint32. So, my question is, what is the correct way to handle 2D textures and set 32-bit pixels on a Metal compute shader?

Bonus question: Also, I've seen example shader codes with texture2d<float, access::read> as the input texture type. I'm assuming it represents a value between 0.0 and 1.0 but what advantage that does that have over an unsigned int with values between 0 and 255?

Edit: To clarify, the output texture of the shader, environmentMap, has the exact same properties (width, height, pixelFormat, etc.) as the input textures. Why I think this is counter intuitive is that we are setting a uint4 as a pixel, which means it's composed of 4 32-bit values, whereas each pixel should be 32-bits. With this current code, {255, 127, 63, 255} has the exact same result as {2550, 127, 63, 255}, meaning the values somehow get clamped between 0-255 before being written to the output texture. But this is extremely counter-intuitive.

10
+50

There's a bit more magic at play than you seem to be familiar with, so I'll try to elucidate.

First of all, by design, there is a loose connection between the storage format of textures in Metal and the type you get when you read/sample. You can have a texture in .bgra8Unorm format that, when sampled through a texture bound as texture2d<float, access::sample> will give you a float4 with its components in RGBA order. The conversion from those packed bytes to the float vector with swizzled components follows well-documented conversion rules as specified in the Metal Shading Language Specification.

It is also the case that, when writing to a texture whose storage is (for example) 8 bits per component, values will be clamped to fit in the underlying storage format. This is further affected by whether or not the texture is a norm type: if the format contains norm, the values are interpreted as if they specified a value between 0 and 1. Otherwise, the values you read are not normalized.

An example: if a texture is .bgra8Unorm and a given pixel contains the byte values [0, 64, 128, 255], then when read in a shader that requests float components, you will get [0.5, 0.25, 0, 1.0] when you sample it. By contrast, if the format is .rgba8Uint, you will get [0, 64, 128, 255]. The storage format of the texture has a prevailing effect on how its contents get interpreted upon sampling.

I assume that the pixel format of your texture is something like .rgba8Unorm. If that's the case, you can achieve what you want by writing your kernel like this:

kernel void updateEnvironmentMap(texture2d<float, access::read> currentFrameTexture [[texture(0)]],
                                 texture2d<float, access::read> coordinateConversionTexture [[texture(1)]],
                                 texture2d<float, access::write> environmentMap [[texture(2)]]
                                 uint2 gid [[thread_position_in_grid]])
{
  const float4 pixel(255, 127, 63, 255);
  environmentMap.write(pixel * (1 / 255.0), gid);
}

By contrast, if your texture has a format of .rgba8Uint, you'll get the same effect by writing it like this:

kernel void updateEnvironmentMap(texture2d<float, access::read> currentFrameTexture [[texture(0)]],
                                 texture2d<float, access::read> coordinateConversionTexture [[texture(1)]],
                                 texture2d<float, access::write> environmentMap [[texture(2)]]
                                 uint2 gid [[thread_position_in_grid]])
{
  const float4 pixel(255, 127, 63, 255);
  environmentMap.write(pixel, gid);
}

I understand that this is a toy example, but I hope that with the foregoing information, you can figure out how to correctly store and sample values to achieve what you want.

  • Thanks Warren, this cleared up a lot of things. Also, if anyone wants further information on this, Metal Shading Language Specification's Chapter 7.7 Texture Addressing and Conversion Rules is the place to look at. – halileohalilei Dec 19 '17 at 12:40

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