1

The MDN documentation concerning array destructuring is pretty self-explanatory, however, I fail to understand what is happening behind the scenes when destructuring an array like so:

let Arr = [1, 3, 5, 6];
let newArr = [];

[newArr[0], ...newArr] = Arr;

console.log(Arr); // returns [1, 3, 5, 6]
console.log(newArr); // returns [3, 5, 6]

How is it that newArr does not inherit the first array member of Arr?

1
  • 2
    A quick tip for understanding more recent syntax like this: Paste the code you don't understand into the Babel repl and compare the input / output
    – Gerrit0
    Commented Dec 10, 2017 at 16:27

2 Answers 2

3

If you had

[x, ...y] = Arr;

it would be like

x = Arr[0];
y = Arr.slice(1);

so when you have

[newArr[0], ...newArr] = Arr;

it’s like

newArr[0] = Arr[0];
newArr = Arr.slice(1);

The assignments involved in destructuring happen left to right. Live:

const listener = {
  get foo() {
    return {
      set bar(value) {
        console.log('setting bar');
      },
    };
  },
  set foo(value) {
    console.log('setting foo');
  },
};

[listener.foo.bar, ...listener.foo] = [1, 2, 3];

0
0

It works, but it overwrites with the rest parameters the first value on index zero.

let array0 = [1, 3, 5, 6],
    array1 = [],
    array2 = [];

[array2[0], ...array1] = array0;

console.log(array0); // [1, 3, 5, 6]
console.log(array1); // [3, 5, 6]
console.log(array2); // [1]
.as-console-wrapper { max-height: 100% !important; top: 0; }

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