4

Usually I avoid using Thread.Sleep except for testing or debugging code.

In the following example, I'm trying to run a console app which will run different classes that will trigger timer ticks at certain times. The idea is to add many more classes that run independent services.

At the moment I'm using, Thread.Sleep(10000); just to keep the console open to allow the code to run.

Surely the Thread.Sleep is blocking some resouces of the CPU?

Is there a better way? (This would be for both Windows and Linux)

while(true)
{
   Thread.Sleep(10000);
}

Program:

class Program
{
    private static CultureInfo culture = new CultureInfo("en-gb");
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        LongRunningClass longRunningClass = new LongRunningClass();

        while(true)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(10000);
        }

    }
}

Long Running Task:

public class LongRunningClass
{

    private Timer timer;
    private List<TimeSpan> ScheduleTimes = new List<TimeSpan>()
    {
        new TimeSpan(4,0,0),
        new TimeSpan(6,0,0),
        new TimeSpan(21,0,0),
        new TimeSpan(23,0,0),
    };

    public LongRunningClass()
    {            
        this.timer = new Timer(1000);
        this.timer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(OnTick);
        this.timer.Start();
    }

    protected virtual void OnTick(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        this.timer.Stop();
        RunLongRunningTask();

        double nextTickInterval = 0;
        TimeSpan timeOfDayNow = DateTime.Now.TimeOfDay;
        foreach (TimeSpan scheduleTime in ScheduleTimes)
        {
            if (scheduleTime > timeOfDayNow)
            {
                nextTickInterval = (scheduleTime - timeOfDayNow).TotalMilliseconds;
                break;
            }
        }

        // If tick interval not set yet then restart for next day
        if (nextTickInterval <= 0)
        {
            TimeSpan scheduleTime = ScheduleTimes[0].Add(new TimeSpan(1, 0, 0, 0));
            nextTickInterval = (scheduleTime - timeOfDayNow).TotalMilliseconds;
        }

        this.timer.Interval = nextTickInterval;


        this.timer.Start();
    }

    private void RunLongRunningTask()
    {
        // Long Running Task
    }
}
2
  • Good question but not a good fit for Stack Overflow. Perhaps Code Review would be better, but check if it's on-topic there first.
    – DavidG
    Dec 10 '17 at 19:18
  • 1
    You might want to look into using a scheduling API like Quartz (not sure if it support .NET Core yet, though): quartz-scheduler.net/features.html
    – lesscode
    Dec 10 '17 at 20:05
3

If it's about keeping the console open. Did you try?

while(true)
{
   Console.Read();
}

or just:

Console.Read();

so, it wouldn't close unless you press a key.

5
  • I wonder what would happen if the OP used while (true) { Console.Read(); }... You forgot a way to actually break that loop Dec 10 '17 at 20:08
  • It does wait for the user to enter something, after that it waits again for the user to enter something. I don't know what the op really wants, but from his code, it was waiting 10 seconds and again waiting 10 seconds infinitely. Dec 10 '17 at 20:16
  • 1
    Exactly, it won't ever break that loop. Dec 10 '17 at 20:17
  • He can use just the Console.Read(); or Console.ReadLine(); so it stops when he enter anything or make a condition on his input, for example it stops when he enters 'a'. Dec 10 '17 at 20:19
  • 1
    Obvious really. I didn't consider using Console.Read() as I wasn't looking for any input but it fits perfectly in this case. Thanks.
    – user3904868
    Dec 10 '17 at 21:13
3

You can keep the console open indefinitely until the user cancels by using an AutoResetEvent:

class Program
{
    private static AutoResetEvent autoResetEvent;

    private static CultureInfo culture = new CultureInfo("en-gb");

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        LongRunningClass longRunningClass = new LongRunningClass();

        WaitForCancel();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// When cancel keys Ctrl+C or Ctrl+Break are used, set the event.
    /// </summary>
    private static void WaitForCancel()
    {
        autoResetEvent = new AutoResetEvent(false);
        Console.WriteLine("Press CTRL + C or CTRL + Break to exit...");

        Console.CancelKeyPress += (sender, e) =>
            {
                e.Cancel = true;
                autoResetEvent.Set();
            };

        autoResetEvent.WaitOne();
    }
}

Obviously, this method relies on you knowing when your threads have finished processing.

1

Surely the Thread.Sleep is blocking some resouces of the CPU?

Its not the CPU you have to worry about, its the memory. You can read the complicated version here, but the simple version is that each thread uses 1MB of memory for the stack. If you are writing an application which needs a lot of threads then you should consider writing async Methods and using Task.Delay. This allows the thread to do something else while the method is waiting, which can reduce the total number of threads needed to process the same workload.

In this case however there isn't much point - while C# 7.1 does support async Main, its just syntactic sugar and doesn't free the thread up to perform other work. In any case I wouldn't loose sleep over using Thread.Sleep in a simple console app like this, or alternatively using something like Console.ReadLine like Neos07 suggests.

1

Thread.Sleep does still work, but you can consider using Task.Delay as an alternative here, like

await Task.Delay(1000);
1
  • OP has no async code so the alternative is not useful here.
    – DavidG
    Dec 10 '17 at 19:34

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