52

Below is a snippet from the book C Programming Just the FAQs. Isn't this wrong as Arrays can never be passed by value?

VIII.6: How can you pass an array to a function by value?

Answer: An array can be passed to a function by value by declaring in the called function the array name with square brackets ([ and ]) attached to the end. When calling the function, simply pass the address of the array (that is, the array’s name) to the called function. For instance, the following program passes the array x[] to the function named byval_func() by value:

The int[] parameter tells the compiler that the byval_func() function will take one argument—an array of integers. When the byval_func() function is called, you pass the address of the array to byval_func():

byval_func(x);

Because the array is being passed by value, an exact copy of the array is made and placed on the stack. The called function then receives this copy of the array and can print it. Because the array passed to byval_func() is a copy of the original array, modifying the array within the byval_func() function has no effect on the original array.

5
  • 2
    This is true for structs - you can pass them by value (over the stack) or by reference but not for arrays.
    – sinelaw
    Jan 23, 2011 at 15:07
  • 19
    This is in a book about C, really? I see it dates from 1995, but this was already plain wrong then. Jan 23, 2011 at 16:11
  • 31
    If that is what it says in the book, you need to chuck the book away - it contains serious misinformation on a basic issue, and who knows what other misinformation on what other issues. The last quoted paragraph is nonsense - if you modify the array in the called function, you are modifying the array in the calling function too, because arrays are not passed by value in C. Jan 23, 2011 at 16:17
  • 1
    Plainly wrong..
    – not-a-user
    Oct 19, 2017 at 15:09
  • "When the byval_func() function is called, you pass the address of the array to byval_func():" - This is the only half-correct sentence from that quote. I wonder why not one of the 5 authors nor at least one of the 7 proofreaders encountered that sentence and evaluated it right. Mar 9, 2020 at 14:02

6 Answers 6

78

Because the array is being passed by value, an exact copy of the array is made and placed on the stack.

This is incorrect: the array itself is not being copied, only a copy of the pointer to its address is passed to the callee (placed on the stack). (Regardless of whether you declare the parameter as int[] or int*, it decays into a pointer.) This allows you to modify the contents of the array from within the called function. Thus, this

Because the array passed to byval_func() is a copy of the original array, modifying the array within the byval_func() function has no effect on the original array.

is plain wrong (kudos to @Jonathan Leffler for his comment below). However, reassigning the pointer inside the function will not change the pointer to the original array outside the function.

8
  • He indeed is. In C++ you can of course have array objects passed by value, but in C, an array is just a pointer. Jan 23, 2011 at 15:07
  • 5
    StefanHållén: You can't pass (or return) arrays by value in either C or C++, you can pass arrays by reference in C++ because C++ has reference types.
    – CB Bailey
    Jan 23, 2011 at 15:09
  • I meant that you could use for instance std::array. Instances of that can be passed and returned by value. Jan 23, 2011 at 15:11
  • @StefanHållén: Please see the tag, this is a C question.
    – CB Bailey
    Jan 23, 2011 at 15:25
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    I would go further; although the sentence you quote is mildly ambiguous and could charitably be construed as correct, the last sentence is simply wrong within the normal meaning of the term 'changing the array'. If the called function writes to array[0], it modifies array[0] in the calling function - under the obvious call notation. Jan 23, 2011 at 16:25
63

Burn that book. If you want a real C FAQ that wasn't written by a beginner programmer, use this one: http://c-faq.com/aryptr/index.html.

Syntax-wise, strictly speaking you cannot pass an array by value in C.

void func (int* x); /* this is a pointer */

void func (int x[]); /* this is a pointer */

void func (int x[10]); /* this is a pointer */

However, for the record there is a dirty trick in C that does allow you to pass an array by value in C. Don't try this at home! Because despite this trick, there is still never a reason to pass an array by value.

typedef struct
{
  int my_array[10];
} Array_by_val;

void func (Array_by_val x);
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    Cosmetics for 3rd example means you can do a sizeof(array)/sizeof(array[0]) in the function
    – Ulterior
    Jun 29, 2012 at 3:17
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    @Ulterior Wouldn't that be nice if it worked? But alas you are wrong, the C standard isn't that smart. Try this: void func (int arr[10]) { printf("No, I am still a pointer, my size is %d.", sizeof(arr)); }. It will print 4 or 8 on a PC, not 40 as you would expect.
    – Lundin
    Dec 11, 2012 at 10:01
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    "Because despite this trick, there is still never a reason to pass an array by value." -- why?
    – user1300214
    Jan 23, 2013 at 10:50
  • 1
    @pbs Lets say you have a 32-bit system and an array of 10 ints. You can pass a pointer, occupy 4 bytes of memory and have the program run fast, or you can use the above dirty trick, occupy 40 bytes of memory and have the program run slow. Furthermore, if you pass an array by value you can't alter it so that the caller is aware of the change.
    – Lundin
    Jan 24, 2013 at 17:47
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    @Lundin I agree that this is better if it can be done. But what if an algorithm requires different copies of the array at each level of a tree. I have written an algorithm in which a copy of a number of points is required for every node of a tree called, and there is no avoiding the amount of memory used, for otherwise the points would not be distinct, which is required. The only possible drawback is that it might be faster in such cases to allocate all memory in one go at the beginning... Then again if the required data is dynamic this may not be possible in general.
    – user1300214
    Jan 25, 2013 at 13:20
2

Isn't this wrong as arrays can never be passed by value?

Exactly. You cannot pass an array by value in C.

I took a look at the quoted part of the book and the source of this confusion or mistake is pretty fast found.

The author did not know about that *i is equivalent to i[] when provided as a parameter to a function. The latter form was invented to explicitly illustrate the reader of the code, that i points to an array, which is a great source of confusion, as well-shown by this question.

What I think is funny, that the author of the particular part of the book or at least one of the other parts (because the book has 5 authors in total) or one of the 7 proofreaders did not mentioned at least the sentence:

"When the byval_func() function is called, you pass the address of the array to byval_func():"

With at least that, they should had noticed that there is a conflict. Since you passing an address, it is only an address. There is nothing magically happen which turns an address into a whole new array.


But back to the question itself:

You can not pass an array as it is by value in C, as you already seem to know yourself. But you can do three (there might be more, but that is my acutal status of it) things, which might be an alternative depending on the unique case, so let´s start.

  1. Encapsulate an array in a structure (as mentioned by other answers):
#include <stdio.h>

struct a_s {
   int a[20];
};

void foo (struct a_s a)
{
   size_t length = sizeof a.a / sizeof *a.a;

   for(size_t i = 0; i < length; i++)
   {
       printf("%d\n",a.a[i]);
   }
}

int main()
{
   struct a_s array;

   size_t length = sizeof array.a / sizeof *array.a;

   for(size_t i = 0; i < length; i++)
   {
       array.a[i] = 15;
   } 

   foo(array);
}
  1. Pass by pointer but also add a parameter for determine the size of the array. In the called function there is made a new array with that size information and assigned with the values from the array in the caller:
#include <stdio.h>

void foo (int *array, size_t length)
{
   int b[length];

   for(size_t i = 0; i < length; i++)
   {
       b[i] = array[i];
       printf("%d\n",b[i]);
   }
}

int main()
{
   int a[10] = {0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9};

   foo(a,(sizeof a / sizeof *a));
}
  1. Avoid to define local arrays and just use one array with global scope:
#include <stdio.h>

int a[10];
size_t length = sizeof a / sizeof *a;

void foo (void)
{
   for(size_t i = 0; i < length; i++)
   {
       printf("%d\n",a[i]);
   }
}

int main()
{   
   for(size_t i = 0; i < length; i++)
   {
       a[i] = 25;
   } 

   foo();
}
1

In C and C++ it is NOT possible to pass a complete block of memory by value as a parameter to a function, but we are allowed to pass its address. In practice this has almost the same effect and it is a much faster and more efficient operation.

To be safe, you can pass the array size or put const qualifier before the pointer to make sure the callee won't change it.

1
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    > To be safe, you can pass the array size or put const qualifier before the pointer to make sure the callee won't change it... WRONG!The function can still modify the memory, even with a const qualifier, although the compiler may try to make it hard. The following compiles without warnings on gcc -Wall. ``` void func(const int* ptr) { (int)(&ptr[0]) = 123; } #include <stdio.h> int main() { int arr[2] = {1, 2}; printf("arr[0]: %d\n", arr[0]); func(arr); printf("arr[0]: %d\n", arr[0]); return 0; } ``` will print ``` arr[0]: 1 arr[0]: 123 ```
    – oromoiluig
    Jan 3, 2019 at 19:33
0

Yuo can work it around by wrapping the array into the struct

#include <stdint.h>
#include <stdio.h>

struct wrap
{
    int x[1000];
};

struct wrap foo(struct wrap x)
{
    struct wrap y;

    for(int index = 0; index < 1000; index ++)
        y.x[index] = x.x[index] * x.x[index];
    return y;
}

int main ()
{
    struct wrap y;

    for(int index = 0; index < 1000; index ++)
        y.x[index] = rand();
    y = foo(y);
    for(int index = 0; index < 1000; index ++)
    {
        printf("%d %s", y.x[index], !(index % 30) ? "\n" : "");
    }


}
-15
#include<stdio.h>
void  fun(int a[],int n);
int main()
{
    int a[5]={1,2,3,4,5};
    fun(a,5);
}
void  fun(int a[],int n)
{
    int i;
    for(i=0;i<=n-1;i++)
        printf("value=%d\n",a[i]);
}

By this method we can pass the array by value, but actually the array is accessing through the its base address which actually copying in the stack.

6
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    No, that does not pass the array by value. The parameter is a pointer. Jun 10, 2013 at 6:34
  • And if fun changed the value of a[0], that change would be visible in main. Jun 10, 2013 at 14:49
  • so how we pass the array by value. In this there are simple passing array and array also behave like constant pointer so when you will pass array by value it's simply means you are passing it by pointer. If you have any example please tell me. Jun 11, 2013 at 6:03
  • You cannot directly pass an array as a parameter in C. (You can pass a structure that has an array as a member, but that's not all that useful, since the array then has to have a fixed size known at compile time.) Suggested reading: Section 6 of the comp.lang.c FAQ. Jun 11, 2013 at 6:36
  • 1
    The accepted answer is correct; array is passed by reference through a pointer to the first item in the array. Primitives are passed by value to the function.
    – Mushy
    Sep 23, 2017 at 16:55

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