450

Anyone have a quick method for de-duplicating a generic List in C#?

  • 3
    Do you care about the order of elements in the result? This will exclude some solutions. – Colonel Panic Dec 1 '17 at 9:25
  • A one line solution: ICollection<MyClass> withoutDuplicates = new HashSet<MyClass>(inputList); – Harald Coppoolse Mar 13 at 12:44

26 Answers 26

214

Perhaps you should consider using a HashSet.

From the MSDN link:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        HashSet<int> evenNumbers = new HashSet<int>();
        HashSet<int> oddNumbers = new HashSet<int>();

        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
        {
            // Populate numbers with just even numbers.
            evenNumbers.Add(i * 2);

            // Populate oddNumbers with just odd numbers.
            oddNumbers.Add((i * 2) + 1);
        }

        Console.Write("evenNumbers contains {0} elements: ", evenNumbers.Count);
        DisplaySet(evenNumbers);

        Console.Write("oddNumbers contains {0} elements: ", oddNumbers.Count);
        DisplaySet(oddNumbers);

        // Create a new HashSet populated with even numbers.
        HashSet<int> numbers = new HashSet<int>(evenNumbers);
        Console.WriteLine("numbers UnionWith oddNumbers...");
        numbers.UnionWith(oddNumbers);

        Console.Write("numbers contains {0} elements: ", numbers.Count);
        DisplaySet(numbers);
    }

    private static void DisplaySet(HashSet<int> set)
    {
        Console.Write("{");
        foreach (int i in set)
        {
            Console.Write(" {0}", i);
        }
        Console.WriteLine(" }");
    }
}

/* This example produces output similar to the following:
 * evenNumbers contains 5 elements: { 0 2 4 6 8 }
 * oddNumbers contains 5 elements: { 1 3 5 7 9 }
 * numbers UnionWith oddNumbers...
 * numbers contains 10 elements: { 0 2 4 6 8 1 3 5 7 9 }
 */
  • 11
    its unbelievable fast... 100.000 strings with List takes 400s and 8MB ram, my own solution takes 2.5s and 28MB, hashset takes 0.1s!!! and 11MB ram – sasjaq Mar 25 '13 at 22:28
  • 3
    HashSet doesn't have an index , therefore it's not always possible to use it. I have to create once a huge list without duplicates and then use it for ListView in the virtual mode. It was super-fast to make a HashSet<> first and then convert it into a List<> (so ListView can access items by index). List<>.Contains() is too slow. – Sinatr Jul 31 '13 at 8:50
  • 55
    Would help if there were an example of how to use a hashset in this particular context. – Nathan McKaskle Jan 28 '15 at 17:04
  • 21
    How can this considered an answer? It's a link – mcont Jun 4 '15 at 15:13
  • 2
    HashSet is great in most circumstances. But if you have an object like DateTime, it compares by reference and not by value, so you will still end up with duplicates. – Jason McKindly Dec 9 '15 at 20:03
772

If you're using .Net 3+, you can use Linq.

List<T> withDupes = LoadSomeData();
List<T> noDupes = withDupes.Distinct().ToList();
  • 12
    That code will fail as .Distinct() returns an IEnumerable<T>. You have to add .ToList() to it. – ljs Sep 6 '08 at 20:21
  • This approach can be used only for list with simple values. – Polaris Nov 8 '10 at 7:06
  • 17
    No, it works with lists containing objects of any type. But you will have to override the default comparer for your type. Like so: public override bool Equals(object obj){...} – BaBu Dec 9 '10 at 14:27
  • 1
    It's always a good idea to override ToString() and GetHashCode() with your classes so that this kind of thing will work. – B Seven Apr 8 '11 at 16:58
  • 2
    You can also use the MoreLinQ Nuget package which has a .DistinctBy() extension method. Pretty useful. – yu_ominae May 16 '13 at 2:49
152

How about:

var noDupes = list.Distinct().ToList();

In .net 3.5?

  • Does it duplicate the list? – darkgaze May 28 at 14:20
  • @darkgaze this just creates another list with only unique entries. So any duplicates will be removed and you're left with a list where every position has a different object. – hexagod Oct 4 at 17:33
86

Simply initialize a HashSet with a List of the same type:

var noDupes = new HashSet<T>(withDupes);

Or, if you want a List returned:

var noDupsList = new HashSet<T>(withDupes).ToList();
  • 3
    ... and if you need a List<T> as result use new HashSet<T>(withDupes).ToList() – Tim Schmelter Feb 9 '17 at 16:29
45

Sort it, then check two and two next to each others, as the duplicates will clump together.

Something like this:

list.Sort();
Int32 index = list.Count - 1;
while (index > 0)
{
    if (list[index] == list[index - 1])
    {
        if (index < list.Count - 1)
            (list[index], list[list.Count - 1]) = (list[list.Count - 1], list[index]);
        list.RemoveAt(list.Count - 1);
        index--;
    }
    else
        index--;
}

Notes:

  • Comparison is done from back to front, to avoid having to resort list after each removal
  • This example now uses C# Value Tuples to do the swapping, substitute with appropriate code if you can't use that
  • The end-result is no longer sorted
  • 1
    If I am not mistaken, most of the approaches mentioned above are just abstractions of this very routines, right? I would have taken your approach here, Lasse, because its how I mentally picture moving through data. But, now I am interested in performance differences between some of the suggestions. – Ian Patrick Hughes Aug 11 '09 at 20:52
  • 7
    Implement them and time them, only way to be sure. Even Big-O notation won't help you with actual performance metrics, only a growth effect relationship. – Lasse Vågsæther Karlsen Aug 12 '09 at 7:03
  • 1
    I like this approach, it is more portable to other languages. – Jerry Liang May 14 '12 at 0:26
  • 10
    Don't do that. It's super slow. RemoveAt is a very costly operation on a List – Clément Feb 9 '13 at 21:53
  • 1
    Clément is right. A way to salvage this would be to wrap this in a method that yields with an enumerator and only return distinct values. Alternatively you could copy values to a new array or list. – JHubbard80 Oct 25 '13 at 17:08
30

It worked for me. simply use

List<Type> liIDs = liIDs.Distinct().ToList<Type>();

Replace "Type" with your desired type e.g. int.

  • 1
    Distinct is in Linq, not System.Collections.Generic as reported by the MSDN page. – Almo Oct 1 '14 at 19:54
  • 5
    This answer (2012) seems to be the same as two other answers on this page that are from 2008? – Jon Schneider Jan 6 '16 at 21:33
29

I like to use this command:

List<Store> myStoreList = Service.GetStoreListbyProvince(provinceId)
                                                 .GroupBy(s => s.City)
                                                 .Select(grp => grp.FirstOrDefault())
                                                 .OrderBy(s => s.City)
                                                 .ToList();

I have these fields in my list: Id, StoreName, City, PostalCode I wanted to show list of cities in a dropdown which has duplicate values. solution: Group by city then pick the first one for the list.

I hope it helps :)

22

As kronoz said in .Net 3.5 you can use Distinct().

In .Net 2 you could mimic it:

public IEnumerable<T> DedupCollection<T> (IEnumerable<T> input) 
{
    var passedValues = new HashSet<T>();

    // Relatively simple dupe check alg used as example
    foreach(T item in input)
        if(passedValues.Add(item)) // True if item is new
            yield return item;
}

This could be used to dedupe any collection and will return the values in the original order.

It's normally much quicker to filter a collection (as both Distinct() and this sample does) than it would be to remove items from it.

  • The problem with this approach though is that it's O(N^2)-ish, as opposed to a hashset. But at least it's evident what it is doing. – Tamas Czinege Jan 29 '09 at 18:25
  • 1
    @DrJokepu - actually I didn't realise that the HashSet constructor deduped, which makes it better for most circumstances. However, this would preserve the sort order, which a HashSet doesn't. – Keith Aug 24 '10 at 14:59
  • 1
    HashSet<T> was introduced in 3.5 – thorn̈ Nov 5 '11 at 19:00
  • 1
    @thorn really? So hard to keep track. In that case you could just use a Dictionary<T, object> instead, replace .Contains with .ContainsKey and .Add(item) with .Add(item, null) – Keith Nov 6 '11 at 22:32
  • @Keith, as per my testing HashSet preserves order while Distinct() doesn't. – Dennis T Jun 9 '15 at 15:50
12

An extension method might be a decent way to go... something like this:

public static List<T> Deduplicate<T>(this List<T> listToDeduplicate)
{
    return listToDeduplicate.Distinct().ToList();
}

And then call like this, for example:

List<int> myFilteredList = unfilteredList.Deduplicate();
11

In Java (I assume C# is more or less identical):

list = new ArrayList<T>(new HashSet<T>(list))

If you really wanted to mutate the original list:

List<T> noDupes = new ArrayList<T>(new HashSet<T>(list));
list.clear();
list.addAll(noDupes);

To preserve order, simply replace HashSet with LinkedHashSet.

  • 5
    in C# it would be: List<T> noDupes = new List<T>(new HashSet<T>(list)); list.Clear(); list.AddRange(noDupes); – smohamed Apr 16 '12 at 14:45
  • In C#, its easier this way: var noDupes = new HashSet<T>(list); list.Clear(); list.AddRange(noDupes); :) – nawfal May 26 '14 at 11:20
8

This takes distinct (the elements without duplicating elements) and convert it into a list again:

List<type> myNoneDuplicateValue = listValueWithDuplicate.Distinct().ToList();
6

As a helper method (without Linq):

public static List<T> Distinct<T>(this List<T> list)
{
    return (new HashSet<T>(list)).ToList();
}
  • I think Distinct is already taken. Apart from that (if you rename method) it should work. – Andreas Reiff Jan 5 '15 at 12:34
6

Use Linq's Union method.

Note: This solution requires no knowledge of Linq, aside from that it exists.

Code

Begin by adding the following to the top of your class file:

using System.Linq;

Now, you can use the following to remove duplicates from an object called, obj1:

obj1 = obj1.Union(obj1).ToList();

Note: Rename obj1 to the name of your object.

How it works

  1. The Union command lists one of each entry of two source objects. Since obj1 is both source objects, this reduces obj1 to one of each entry.

  2. The ToList() returns a new List. This is necessary, because Linq commands like Union returns the result as an IEnumerable result instead of modifying the original List or returning a new List.

5

If you don't care about the order you can just shove the items into a HashSet, if you do want to maintain the order you can do something like this:

var unique = new List<T>();
var hs = new HashSet<T>();
foreach (T t in list)
    if (hs.Add(t))
        unique.Add(t);

Or the Linq way:

var hs = new HashSet<T>();
list.All( x =>  hs.Add(x) );

Edit: The HashSet method is O(N) time and O(N) space while sorting and then making unique (as suggested by @lassevk and others) is O(N*lgN) time and O(1) space so it's not so clear to me (as it was at first glance) that the sorting way is inferior (my apologies for the temporary down vote...)

5

Here's an extension method for removing adjacent duplicates in-situ. Call Sort() first and pass in the same IComparer. This should be more efficient than Lasse V. Karlsen's version which calls RemoveAt repeatedly (resulting in multiple block memory moves).

public static void RemoveAdjacentDuplicates<T>(this List<T> List, IComparer<T> Comparer)
{
    int NumUnique = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < List.Count; i++)
        if ((i == 0) || (Comparer.Compare(List[NumUnique - 1], List[i]) != 0))
            List[NumUnique++] = List[i];
    List.RemoveRange(NumUnique, List.Count - NumUnique);
}
4

Installing the MoreLINQ package via Nuget, you can easily distinct object list by a property

IEnumerable<Catalogue> distinctCatalogues = catalogues.DistinctBy(c => c.CatalogueCode); 
2

Might be easier to simply make sure that duplicates are not added to the list.

if(items.IndexOf(new_item) < 0) 
    items.add(new_item)
  • 1
    I'm currently doing it like this but the more entries you have the longer the check for duplicates takes. – Robert Strauch Jun 24 '13 at 14:59
  • I have the same problem here. I'm using the List<T>.Contains method each time but with more than 1,000,000 entries. This process slows down my application. I'm using a List<T>.Distinct().ToList<T>() first instead. – RPDeshaies Jan 3 '14 at 19:05
  • This method is very slow – darkgaze May 28 at 14:22
1

Another way in .Net 2.0

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<string> alpha = new List<string>();

        for(char a = 'a'; a <= 'd'; a++)
        {
            alpha.Add(a.ToString());
            alpha.Add(a.ToString());
        }

        Console.WriteLine("Data :");
        alpha.ForEach(delegate(string t) { Console.WriteLine(t); });

        alpha.ForEach(delegate (string v)
                          {
                              if (alpha.FindAll(delegate(string t) { return t == v; }).Count > 1)
                                  alpha.Remove(v);
                          });

        Console.WriteLine("Unique Result :");
        alpha.ForEach(delegate(string t) { Console.WriteLine(t);});
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
1

There are many ways to solve - the duplicates issue in the List, below is one of them:

List<Container> containerList = LoadContainer();//Assume it has duplicates
List<Container> filteredList = new  List<Container>();
foreach (var container in containerList)
{ 
  Container duplicateContainer = containerList.Find(delegate(Container checkContainer)
  { return (checkContainer.UniqueId == container.UniqueId); });
   //Assume 'UniqueId' is the property of the Container class on which u r making a search

    if(!containerList.Contains(duplicateContainer) //Add object when not found in the new class object
      {
        filteredList.Add(container);
       }
  }

Cheers Ravi Ganesan

1

Here's a simple solution that doesn't require any hard-to-read LINQ or any prior sorting of the list.

   private static void CheckForDuplicateItems(List<string> items)
    {
        if (items == null ||
            items.Count == 0)
            return;

        for (int outerIndex = 0; outerIndex < items.Count; outerIndex++)
        {
            for (int innerIndex = 0; innerIndex < items.Count; innerIndex++)
            {
                if (innerIndex == outerIndex) continue;
                if (items[outerIndex].Equals(items[innerIndex]))
                {
                    // Duplicate Found
                }
            }
        }
    }
  • 18
    that is easier to read than Linq? – Cor_Blimey Oct 17 '12 at 20:41
  • You have more control on duplicated items with this method. Even more if you have a database to update. For the innerIndex, why no starting from outerIndex+1 instead starting from beginning every time ? – Nolmë Informatique Apr 22 '17 at 10:16
1

David J.'s answer is a good method, no need for extra objects, sorting, etc. It can be improved on however:

for (int innerIndex = items.Count - 1; innerIndex > outerIndex ; innerIndex--)

So the outer loop goes top bottom for the entire list, but the inner loop goes bottom "until the outer loop position is reached".

The outer loop makes sure the entire list is processed, the inner loop finds the actual duplicates, those can only happen in the part that the outer loop hasn't processed yet.

Or if you don't want to do bottom up for the inner loop you could have the inner loop start at outerIndex + 1.

1

You can use Union

obj2 = obj1.Union(obj1).ToList();
  • 7
    Explanation why it would work would definitely make this answer better – Igor B Aug 6 '17 at 15:26
1

If you have tow classes Product and Customer and we want to remove duplicate items from their list

public class Product
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string ProductName { get; set; }

}

public class Customer
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string CustomerName { get; set; }

}

You must define a generic class in the form below

public class ItemEqualityComparer<T> : IEqualityComparer<T> where T : class
{
    private readonly PropertyInfo _propertyInfo;

    public ItemEqualityComparer(string keyItem)
    {
        _propertyInfo = typeof(T).GetProperty(keyItem, BindingFlags.GetProperty | BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public);
    }

    public bool Equals(T x, T y)
    {
        var xValue = _propertyInfo?.GetValue(x, null);
        var yValue = _propertyInfo?.GetValue(y, null);
        return xValue != null && yValue != null && xValue.Equals(yValue);
    }

    public int GetHashCode(T obj)
    {
        var propertyValue = _propertyInfo.GetValue(obj, null);
        return propertyValue == null ? 0 : propertyValue.GetHashCode();
    }
}

then, You can remove duplicate items in your list.

var products = new List<Product>
            {
                new Product{ProductName = "product 1" ,Id = 1,},
                new Product{ProductName = "product 2" ,Id = 2,},
                new Product{ProductName = "product 2" ,Id = 4,},
                new Product{ProductName = "product 2" ,Id = 4,},
            };
var productList = products.Distinct(new ItemEqualityComparer<Product>(nameof(Product.Id))).ToList();

var customers = new List<Customer>
            {
                new Customer{CustomerName = "Customer 1" ,Id = 5,},
                new Customer{CustomerName = "Customer 2" ,Id = 5,},
                new Customer{CustomerName = "Customer 2" ,Id = 5,},
                new Customer{CustomerName = "Customer 2" ,Id = 5,},
            };
var customerList = customers.Distinct(new ItemEqualityComparer<Customer>(nameof(Customer.Id))).ToList();

this code remove duplicate items by Id if you want remove duplicate items by other property, you can change nameof(YourClass.DuplicateProperty) same nameof(Customer.CustomerName) then remove duplicate items by CustomerName Property.

0
  public static void RemoveDuplicates<T>(IList<T> list )
  {
     if (list == null)
     {
        return;
     }
     int i = 1;
     while(i<list.Count)
     {
        int j = 0;
        bool remove = false;
        while (j < i && !remove)
        {
           if (list[i].Equals(list[j]))
           {
              remove = true;
           }
           j++;
        }
        if (remove)
        {
           list.RemoveAt(i);
        }
        else
        {
           i++;
        }
     }  
  }
0

A simple intuitive implementation:

public static List<PointF> RemoveDuplicates(List<PointF> listPoints)
{
    List<PointF> result = new List<PointF>();

    for (int i = 0; i < listPoints.Count; i++)
    {
        if (!result.Contains(listPoints[i]))
            result.Add(listPoints[i]);
        }

        return result;
    }
  • This method is slow as well. Creates a new list. – darkgaze May 28 at 14:23
0

All answers copy lists, or create a new list, or use slow functions, or are just painfully slow.

To my understanding, this is the fastest and cheapest method I know (also, backed by a very experienced programmer specialized on real-time physics optimization).

// Duplicates will be noticed after a sort O(nLogn)
list.Sort();

// Store the current and last items. Current item declaration is not really needed, and probably optimized by the compiler, but in case it's not...
int lastItem = -1;
int currItem = -1;

int size = list.Count;

// Store the index pointing to the last item we want to keep in the list
int last = size - 1;

// Travel the items from last to first O(n)
for (int i = last; i >= 0; --i)
{
    currItem = list[i];

    // If this item was the same as the previous one, we don't want it
    if (currItem == lastItem)
    {
        // Overwrite last in current place. It is a swap but we don't need the last
       list[i] = list[last];

        // Reduce the last index, we don't want that one anymore
        last--;
    }

    // A new item, we store it and continue
    else
        lastItem = currItem;
}

// We now have an unsorted list with the duplicates at the end.

// Remove the last items just once
list.RemoveRange(last + 1, size - last - 1);

// Sort again O(n logn)
list.Sort();

Final cost is:

nlogn + n + nlogn = n + 2nlogn = O(nlogn) which is pretty nice.

Note about RemoveRange: Since we cannot set the count of the list and avoid using the Remove funcions, I don't know exactly the speed of this operation but I guess it is the fastest way.

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