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I am working with a java application that returns a string which contains 2 dates.

The months are written out in full (in dutch) and the day can be either one or two charcaters long (eg. 1 december 2017 or 12 december 2017)

I need to filter both dates from the string and convert them to date type, so I can calculate the difference between the two.

I have managed to come up with the following code, which does work. I have the feeling it can be done with a lot less code though.

I've been reading up on regular expressions, but I am unsure if they can be used, given that the date's in my string arený always the same length.

String baseString =
    "Bijgewerkt tot: 30 november 2017 15:39. Nieuwe bundel: 20 december 2017";

String baseStringEdited = baseString    
    .replaceAll(" januari ", " 01 ")
    .replaceAll(" februari ", " 02 ")
    .replaceAll(" maart ", " 03 ")
    .replaceAll(" april ", " 04 ")
    .replaceAll(" mei ", " 05 ")
    .replaceAll(" juni ", " 06 ")
    .replaceAll(" juli ", " 07 ")
    .replaceAll(" augustus ", " 08 ")
    .replaceAll(" september ", " 09 ")
    .replaceAll(" oktober ", " 10 ")
    .replaceAll(" november ", " 11 ")
    .replaceAll(" december ", " 12 ")
    .replaceAll(" 1 ", " 01 ")
    .replaceAll(" 2 ", " 02 ")
    .replaceAll(" 3 ", " 03 ")
    .replaceAll(" 4 ", " 04 ")
    .replaceAll(" 5 ", " 05 ")
    .replaceAll(" 6 ", " 06 ")
    .replaceAll(" 7 ", " 07 ")
    .replaceAll(" 8 ", " 08 ")
    .replaceAll(" 9 ", " 09 ");

String dateOne = baseStringEdited.substring(16, 26);
String dateTwo = baseStringEdited.substring(49);

SimpleDateFormat dateFormatter = new SimpleDateFormat ("dd MM yyyy"); 

String input = dateOne; 
String input2 = dateTwo;
Long diff = null;

try {
    Date dateOneFormatted = dateFormatter.parse(input); 
    Date dateTwoFormatted = dateFormatter.parse(input2);
    diff = dateOneFormatted.getTime() - dateTwoFormatted.getTime();

} catch (ParseException e) { 
    System.out.println("Unparseable using " + dateFormatter); 
}

System.out.println(TimeUnit.DAYS.convert(diff, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS));
4
  • Since you stated that your code works, what is your question again? Dec 11, 2017 at 12:49
  • 1
    You can use regular expressions to get the dates. A fitting regex for the date-part with an optional time part would be \d\d \w+ \d{4} (\d\d\:\d\d)?
    – Lothar
    Dec 11, 2017 at 12:49
  • 2
    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because questions about working code belong on CodeReview
    – Michael
    Dec 11, 2017 at 12:51
  • 1
    Tips: Work with proper objects when feasible, rather than mucking about with strings and regex. We have the excellent java.time classes, so use them. And when serializing data-time values as strings, use only the standard ISO 8601 formats. Dec 11, 2017 at 19:20

3 Answers 3

3

Using the java time API, you can simply adapt the formatters to "ignore" the extra text. Also, if you specify the correct Locale, you can parse the month names without having to map them manually.

String[] dates = baseString.split("\\. ");

DateTimeFormatter firstFmt = DateTimeFormatter.ofPattern("'Bijgewerkt tot: 'd MMMM uuuu HH:mm", new Locale("nl"));
LocalDateTime first = LocalDateTime.parse(dates[0], firstFmt );

DateTimeFormatter secondFmt = DateTimeFormatter.ofPattern("'Nieuwe bundel: 'd MMMM uuuu", new Locale("nl"));
LocalDate second = LocalDate.parse(dates[1], secondFmt);

System.out.println("First: " + first);
System.out.println("Second: " + second);

Note that the code can easily be adapted to use a SimpleDateFormat if you don't have a choice.

5
  • This looks a lot better and seems to work just as well, thanks!
    – Martijn
    Dec 11, 2017 at 13:11
  • I like the “if you don't have a choice” part. In other words, I do recommend using java.time as in this answer.
    – Anonymous
    Dec 11, 2017 at 13:18
  • @assylias I suggest you specify it only exists from Java 8 on to avoid confusion Dec 11, 2017 at 13:42
  • @ChristopheRoussy, java.time, also known as JSR-310, has been backported to Java 6 and 7 in the ThreeTen Backport. You can use it from Java 6 through Java 9 (and counting).
    – Anonymous
    Dec 11, 2017 at 14:15
  • 1
    Good thing they backported it :) Dec 11, 2017 at 14:31
0

I would replace :

String dateOne = baseStringEdited.substring(16, 26);
String dateTwo = baseStringEdited.substring(49);

because it works for certain inputs, with :

String digits = baseStringEdited.replaceAll("\\D+","");
String dateOne=digits.substring(0,8);
String dateTwo=digits.substring(12);

which is suitable for any input.

0

Try this code using regular expressions and LocalDate:

import java.time.LocalDate;
import java.time.ZoneId;
import java.time.format.DateTimeFormatter;
import java.time.format.FormatStyle;
import java.util.Date;
import java.util.Locale;
import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;
import java.util.regex.Matcher;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;

public class TestDate {
    public static String inputString = "Bijgewerkt tot: 30 november 2017 15:39. Nieuwe bundel: 20 december 2017";
    private static final Pattern datePattern = Pattern.compile(
            "(?sim)(\\d{1,2}\\s(januari|februari|maart|april|mei|juni|juli|augustus|september|oktober|november|december)\\s\\d{4})");
    private static final Locale dutch = new Locale("nl", "NL");
    private static DateTimeFormatter f;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        f = DateTimeFormatter.ofLocalizedDate(FormatStyle.LONG).withLocale(dutch);
        Date[] dateList = new Date[2];

        Matcher regexMatcher = datePattern.matcher(inputString);
        Date date;
        LocalDate ld;
        int i = 0;
        while (regexMatcher.find()) {
            ld = LocalDate.parse(regexMatcher.group(1), f);
            date = Date.from(ld.atStartOfDay(ZoneId.systemDefault()).toInstant());
            dateList[i] = date;
            i++;
        }
        Long diff = dateList[0].getTime() - dateList[1].getTime();
        System.out.println(TimeUnit.DAYS.convert(diff, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS));
    }
}

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