I am trying to generate a matrix of numbers with 7 rows and 4 columns. Each row must sum to 100 and each column must have an even spread (if permitted) between a min and max range (specified below).

Goal:

       C1      C2    C3    C4   sum   range 
 1     low                      100    ^
 2     ..                              |  
 3     ..                              |
 4     ..                              | 
 5     ..                              |
 6     ..                              |
 7     high                            _

c1_high = 98
c1_low = 75
c2_high = 15
c2_low = 6
c3_high = 8
c3_low = 2
c4_low = 0.05
c4_high =0.5

In addition to this, i need the spread of each row to be as linear as possible, though a line fitted to the data with a second order polynomial would suffice (with an r^2 value of >0.98).

I am currently trying to do this using the following sudocode:

  1. generate random number between ranges for c1,c2,c3 and c4.
  2. repeat this 7 times
  3. check correlation between each generated c1 value and a range of numbers from 1-7. For example:

enter image description here

  1. repeat step 3 for c2,c3 and c4.

  2. Break loop when step 3 and 4 are successful

This has proven to be too burdensome in terms of the number of iterations required and as a result, the solution is never reached.

Is there a more efficient way of achieving this solution?

So far:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
from sklearn.utils import shuffle

c1_high = 98
c1_low = 75
c2_high = 15
c2_low = 6
c3_high = 8
c3_low = 2
c4_low = 0.05
c4_high =0.5

def matrix_gen(): #generates matrix within min and max values
    container =[]
    d={}
    offset = np.linspace(0.05,1,9)
    c1= np.linspace(c1_low, c1_high, 7)
    c2= np.linspace(c2_low, c2_high, 7)
    c3= np.linspace(c3_low, c3_high, 7)
    c4= np.linspace(c4_low, c4_high, 7)

    for i in np.arange(7):
        d["row{0}".format(i)]=[item[i] for item in [c1,c2,c3,c4]]

    df =pd.DataFrame(d)
    df.loc[4,:] = df.iloc[0,:][::-1].values
    df1 = df.drop(0)
    df1.loc[5,:] = df1.sum(axis=0)
    new_name = df1.index[-1]
    df1 = df1.rename(index={new_name: 'sum'})
    return df1

m = matrix_gen()
print(m)

out:

       row0        row1        row2     row3        row4       row5  row6
1      6.00    7.500000    9.000000   10.500   12.000000  13.500000  15.0
2      2.00    3.000000    4.000000    5.000    6.000000   7.000000   8.0
3      0.05    0.125000    0.200000    0.275    0.350000   0.425000   0.5
4     98.00   94.166667   90.333333   86.500   82.666667  78.833333  75.0
sum  106.05  104.791667  103.533333  102.275  101.016667  99.758333  98.5

next function:

def shuf():  # attempts at shuffling the values around such that the 'sum' row is as close to 100 as possible. 
    df = matrix_gen()
    df1 = df[1:4]
    count =0
    while True:
        df1 = shuffle(df1)
        df1.loc[5,:] = df1.sum(axis=0)
        for i in df1.loc[5].values:
            if 98<= i <=100:
                print('solution')
                return df1
            else:
                count+=1
                print(count)
                continue

opt = shuf()
print(opt)

next function will need to apply a deviation to each number to provide a sum of each row equal to 100. Optimization should include minimizing deviations.

  • What if you started from the other end: generate a set of support points, equidistantly distributed within the range for each column, so that they lie on a straight line. Then you shift each point by a small random offset (small enough to satisfy the constraints. You can repeat the last step a couple of times and take the valid values with the largest offsets. – Pavel Dec 11 '17 at 13:51
  • This sounds great. I'll give it a try. I may get stuck applying this so-called 'shift' in a loop. – Joey Dec 11 '17 at 13:54
  • Can you explain in more detail? As it stands it seems impossible, since the 95 occurring in the first column even if paired with the smallest elements of the other columns will sum to something >100. – Paul Panzer Dec 11 '17 at 13:55
  • @PaulPanzer , sorry should be 94! – Joey Dec 11 '17 at 13:57
  • Then, what about using the last three in order and the first upside down? That'll get you very close already – Paul Panzer Dec 11 '17 at 14:02
up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

Your numbers are small enough for a smart brute force approach.

I use two methods to quantify and minimize deviations from the "clean" equidistant values (linspace(low, high, 7)). "abserr" for squared difference and "relerr" for squared error divided by squared clean value. I also check corrcoefs in the very end but I've never seen anything below 99.8%

The following code first finds the shuffle od the clean values with the smallest error. This takes just a few seconds, because we use the following tricks:

  • split the 4 columns into two pairs
  • each pair has 7! relative arrangements, a mangeable number even when squared (one factor for each pair)
  • compute these (7!)^2 shuffles and sum over pairs
  • to not have to iterate over all relative shuffles between the pairs we observe that the total error is minimized if the the two sets of pair sums are arranged in opposite order this is true for "abserr" and "relerr"

In the end the values are corrected to make rows sum to 100. Here again we use the fact that the summed error is minimized when evenly spread.

The code below contains two variants a legacy one solve which contains a small inaccuracy when minimizing relerr and a corrected version improved_solve. They frequently find different solutions but in more than 100 random problems only one led to a very slightly smaller error with improved_solve.

Answers to a few examples:

OP's example:

                ((75, 98), (6, 15), (2, 8), (0.05, 0.5))

solve relerr                            improved_solve relerr                  
table:                                  table:                                 
76.14213 15.22843  8.12183  0.50761     76.14213 15.22843  8.12183  0.50761    
79.02431 13.53270  7.01696  0.42603     79.02431 13.53270  7.01696  0.42603    
81.83468 11.87923  5.93961  0.34648     81.83468 11.87923  5.93961  0.34648    
84.57590 10.26644  4.88878  0.26888     84.57590 10.26644  4.88878  0.26888    
87.25048  8.69285  3.86349  0.19317     87.25048  8.69285  3.86349  0.19317    
89.86083  7.15706  2.86282  0.11928     89.86083  7.15706  2.86282  0.11928    
92.40924  5.65771  1.88590  0.04715     92.40924  5.65771  1.88590  0.04715    
avgerr:                                 avgerr:                                
 0.03239                                 0.03239                               
corrcoefs:                              corrcoefs:                             
 0.99977  0.99977  0.99977  0.99977      0.99977  0.99977  0.99977  0.99977 

An example where sorting some colums ascending some descending is not optimal:

                ((11, 41), (4, 34), (37, 49), (0.01, 23.99))

Note that the solvers find different solutions, but the error is the same.

solve relerr                            improved_solve relerr                  
table:                                  table:                                 
10.89217 18.81374 46.53926 23.75483     11.00037 24.00080 49.00163 15.99720    
26.00087  9.00030 49.00163 15.99720     16.00107 19.00127 45.00300 19.99467    
31.00207  4.00027 45.00300 19.99467     25.74512 13.86276 36.63729 23.75483    
16.00000 29.00000 43.00000 12.00000     35.99880  8.99970 46.99843  8.00307    
20.99860 33.99773 40.99727  4.00640     41.00000  4.00000 43.00000 12.00000    
40.99863 13.99953 36.99877  8.00307     20.99860 33.99773 40.99727  4.00640    
36.35996 24.23998 39.38996  0.01010     31.30997 29.28997 39.38996  0.01010    
avgerr:                                 avgerr:                                
 0.00529                                 0.00529                               
corrcoefs:                              corrcoefs:                             
 0.99993  0.99994  0.99876  0.99997      0.99989  0.99994  0.99877  0.99997 

This is the problem where improved_solve actually beats legacy solve:

                ((36.787862883725872, 43.967159949544317),
                 (40.522239654303483, 47.625869880574164),
                 (19.760537036548321, 49.183056694462799),
                 (45.701873101046154, 48.051424087501672))

solve relerr                            improved_solve relerr                  
table:                                  table:                                 
21.36407 23.53276 28.56241 26.54076     20.25226 26.21874 27.07599 26.45301    
22.33545 24.52391 26.03695 27.10370     21.53733 26.33278 25.10656 27.02333    
23.33149 25.54022 23.44736 27.68093     22.90176 26.45386 23.01550 27.62888    
24.35314 26.58266 20.79119 28.27301     24.35314 26.58266 20.79119 28.27301    
25.40141 27.65226 18.06583 28.88050     25.90005 26.71994 18.42047 28.95953    
26.47734 28.75009 15.26854 29.50403     27.55225 26.86656 15.88840 29.69279    
27.58205 29.87728 12.39644 30.14424     29.32086 27.02351 13.17793 30.47771    
avgerr:                                 avgerr:                                
 0.39677                                 0.39630                               
corrcoefs:                              corrcoefs:                             
 0.99975  0.99975  0.99975  0.99975      0.99847  0.99847  0.99847  0.99847 

Code:

import numpy as np
import itertools
import math

N_CHUNKS = 3

def improved_solve(LH, errtype='relerr'):
    N = math.factorial(7)
    # accept anything that looks like a 2d array
    LH = np.asanyarray(LH)
    # build equidistant columns
    C = np.array([np.linspace(l, h, 7) for l, h in LH])
    # subtract offset; it's cheaper now than later
    c0, c1, c2, c3 = C - 25
    # list all permutiations of a single column
    p = np.array(list(itertools.permutations(range(7))))
    # split into left and right halves, compute all relative permutiations
    # and sort them by their sums of corresponding elements.
    # Left pairs in ascending, right pairs in descending order.
    L = np.sort(c0 + c1[p], axis=1)
    R = np.sort(c2 + c3[p], axis=1)[:, ::-1]
    # For each pair of permutations l in L, r in R compute the smallest
    # possible error (sum of squared deviations.)
    if errtype == 'relerr':
        err = np.empty((N, N))
        split = np.linspace(0, N, N_CHUNKS+1, dtype=int)[1:-1]
        for LCH, ECH in zip(np.split(L, split, axis=0),
                            np.split(err, split, axis=0)):
            dev = LCH[:, None] + R[None, :]
            ((dev / (100+dev))**2).sum(axis=-1, out=ECH)
        del dev
    elif errtype == 'abserr':
        err = (np.add.outer(np.einsum('ij,ij->i', L, L),
                            np.einsum('ij,ij->i', R, R))
               + np.einsum('ik, jk->ij', 2*L, R))
    else:
        raise ValueError
    # find pair of pairs with smallest error
    i = np.argmin(err.ravel())
    i1, i3 = np.unravel_index(i, (N, N))
    # recreate shuffled table
    c0, c1, c2, c3 = C        
    lidx = np.argsort(c0 + c1[p[i1]])
    ridx = np.argsort(c2 + c3[p[i3]])[::-1]
    C = np.array([c0[lidx], c1[p[i1]][lidx], c2[ridx], c3[p[i3]][ridx]])
    # correct rowsums, calculate error and corrcoef and return
    if errtype == 'relerr':
        result = C * (100.0 / C.sum(axis=0, keepdims=True))
        err = math.sqrt((((result-C)/C)**2).mean())
    else:
        result = C + (25 - C.mean(axis=0, keepdims=True))
        err = math.sqrt(((result-C)**2).mean())
    rs = np.sort(result, axis=1)
    cc = tuple(np.corrcoef(ri, range(7))[0, 1] for ri in rs)
    return dict(table=result.T, avgerr=err, corrcoefs=cc)

def solve(LH, errtype='relerr'):
    LH = np.asanyarray(LH)
    if errtype=='relerr':
        err1 = 200 / LH.sum()
        diff = np.diff(LH * err1, axis=1).ravel()
    elif errtype=='abserr':
        err1 = 25 - LH.mean()
        diff = np.diff(LH, axis=1).ravel()
    else:
        raise ValueError
    C = np.array([np.linspace(-d/2, d/2, 7) for d in diff])
    c0, c1, c2, c3 = C
    p = np.array(list(itertools.permutations(range(7))))
    L = np.sort(c0 + c1[p], axis=1)
    R = np.sort(c2 + c3[p], axis=1)[:, ::-1]
    err = (np.add.outer(np.einsum('ij,ij->i', L, L),
                        np.einsum('ij,ij->i', R, R))
           + np.einsum('ik, jk->ij', 2*L, R)).ravel()
    i = np.argmin(err)
    i1, i3 = np.unravel_index(i, (math.factorial(7), math.factorial(7)))
    L = np.argsort(c0 + c1[p[i1]])
    R = np.argsort(c2 + c3[p[i3]])[::-1]
    ref = [np.linspace(l, h, 7) for l, h in LH]
    if errtype=='relerr':
        c0, c1, c2, c3 = [np.linspace(l, h, 7) for l, h in LH * err1]
        C = np.array([c0[L], c1[p[i1]][L], c2[R], c3[p[i3]][R]])
        err2 = 100 / np.sum(C, axis=0)
        C *= err2
        cs = list(map(sorted, C))
        err = math.sqrt(sum((c/r-1)**2 for ci, ri in zip(cs, ref) for c, r in zip(ci, ri)) / 28)
    elif errtype=='abserr':
        c0, c1, c2, c3 = [np.linspace(l, h, 7) for l, h in LH + err1]
        C = np.array([c0[L], c1[p[i1]][L], c2[R], c3[p[i3]][R]])
        err2 = 25 - np.mean(C, axis=0)
        C += err2
        cs = list(map(sorted, C))
        err = math.sqrt(sum((c-r)**2 for ci, ri in zip(cs, ref) for c, r in zip(ci, ri)) / 28)
    else:
        raise ValueError
    cc = tuple(np.corrcoef(ci, range(7))[0, 1] for ci in cs)
    return dict(table=C.T, avgerr=err, corrcoefs=cc)

for problem in [((75, 98), (6, 15), (2, 8), (0.05, 0.5)),
                ((11, 41), (4, 34), (37, 49), (0.01, 23.99)),
                ((80, 94), (5, 14), (0.5, 5), (0.05, 0.5)),
                ((36.787862883725872, 43.967159949544317),
                 (40.522239654303483, 47.625869880574164),
                 (19.760537036548321, 49.183056694462799),
                 (45.701873101046154, 48.051424087501672))]:
    for errtype in ('relerr', 'abserr'):
        print()
        columns = []
        for solver in (solve, improved_solve):
            sol = solver(problem, errtype)
            column = [[' '.join((solver.__name__, errtype))]] + \
                     [[k + ':'] + [' '.join([f'{e:8.5f}' for e in r])
                                   for r in np.atleast_2d(v)]
                      for k, v in sol.items()]
            column = (line for block in column for line in block)
            columns.append(column)
        for l, r in zip(*columns):
            print(f"{l:39s} {r:39s}")

problems = []
for i in range(0):
    problem = np.sort(np.random.random((4, 2)), axis=1) * 50
    for errtype in ('relerr', 'abserr'):
        sol0 = solve(problem, errtype)
        sol1 = improved_solve(problem, errtype)
        if not np.allclose(sol0['table'], sol1['table']):
            print(i, end= " ")
            if np.abs((sol0['avgerr']-sol1['avgerr'])
                      /(sol0['avgerr']+sol1['avgerr']))>1e-6:
                print(problem)
                problems.append(problem)
                columns = []
                for sol, name in [(sol0, 'old '), (sol1, 'improved ')]:
                    column = [[name + errtype]] + \
                             [[k + ':'] + [' '.join([f'{e:8.5f}' for e in r])
                                           for r in np.atleast_2d(v)]
                              for k, v in sol.items()]
                    column = (line for block in column for line in block)
                    columns.append(column)
                for l, r in zip(*columns):
                    print(f"{l:39s} {r:39s}")
  • Thanks, I do like a brute force tool... however when trying to run this, I get the following error: 'Traceback (most recent call last): File "C:/Users/.../Desktop/matrix solver.py", line 30, in <module> sol = solve(((75, 98), (6, 15), (2, 8), (0.05, 0.5))) File "C:/Users/.../Desktop/matrix solver.py", line 14, in solve err = ((L[:, None, :] + R[None, :, :])**2).sum(axis=-1).ravel() MemoryError' – Joey Dec 14 '17 at 14:17
  • Oops. How much RAM do you have? It runs no prob on my 8GB laptop. We'll probably just have to chunk it a bit to make it run on your rig. – Paul Panzer Dec 14 '17 at 14:38
  • Strange.. I also have 8GB! – Joey Dec 14 '17 at 14:46
  • Ok, I've changed the line to something that should be a bit easier on the memory. Could you give it a go? – Paul Panzer Dec 14 '17 at 15:03
  • Yes, this worked. Out of curiosity, would I be in trouble with memory again if I were to extend the number of components to say 8 instead of4? – Joey Dec 14 '17 at 15:13

I think an interesting approach would be to use an optimization model.

Ordered values

Let x(i,j) be the matrix your want to fill. Then we have:

sum(j, x(i,j)) = 100   ∀i
L(j) ≤ x(i,j) ≤ U(j)   ∀i,j
x(i,j) = x(i-1,j) + step(j) + deviation(i,j)
   special cases:
     x(1,j) = L(j) + deviation(1,j)
     and x(m,j) = U(j) + deviation(m,j)
step(j) ≥ 0
minimize sum((i,j), deviation(i,j)^2 )

This is a quadratic programming problem. It is possible to absolute deviations instead of squared ones. In that case you have an LP.

The model can be refined to minimize squared relative errors.

This is a little bit related to what is called matrix balancing (a statistical technique often used in economic modeling).

Unordered values

In the above I assumed the values had to be ordered. Now I understand this is not the case. I adapted the model to handle this as follows. First an overview of the results.

The input data is:

----     17 PARAMETER LO  

c1 80.000,    c2  5.000,    c3  0.500,    c4  0.050


----     17 PARAMETER UP  

c1 94.000,    c2 14.000,    c3  5.000,    c4  0.500

Warning: Note that this data has been changed by the poster. My answer is using the original LO and UP values before they were changed.

The model operates in three steps:

(1) populate a perfectly organized matrix without obeying the row sum constraints. This can be done outside the model. I generated simply:

----     53 PARAMETER init  initial matrix

            c1          c2          c3          c4      rowsum

r1      80.000       5.000       0.500       0.050      85.550
r2      82.333       6.500       1.250       0.125      90.208
r3      84.667       8.000       2.000       0.200      94.867
r4      87.000       9.500       2.750       0.275      99.525
r5      89.333      11.000       3.500       0.350     104.183
r6      91.667      12.500       4.250       0.425     108.842
r7      94.000      14.000       5.000       0.500     113.500

I.e. from lo(j) to up(j) with equal steps.

(2) The second step is to permute the values within a column to achieve a solution that has a close match to the row sums. This gives:

----     53 VARIABLE y.L  after permutation

            c1          c2          c3          c4      rowsum

r1      94.000       5.000       0.500       0.125      99.625
r2      82.333      12.500       4.250       0.500      99.583
r3      89.333       8.000       2.000       0.200      99.533
r4      87.000       9.500       2.750       0.275      99.525
r5      84.667      11.000       3.500       0.350      99.517
r6      91.667       6.500       1.250       0.050      99.467
r7      80.000      14.000       5.000       0.425      99.425

This is already very close and maintains "perfect" spread.

(3) Change the values a little bit by adding a deviation such that the row sums are exactly 100. Minimize the sum of the squared relative deviations. This gives:

----     53 VARIABLE x.L  final values

            c1          c2          c3          c4      rowsum

r1      94.374       5.001       0.500       0.125     100.000
r2      82.747      12.503       4.250       0.500     100.000
r3      89.796       8.004       2.000       0.200     100.000
r4      87.469       9.506       2.750       0.275     100.000
r5      85.142      11.007       3.501       0.350     100.000
r6      92.189       6.510       1.251       0.050     100.000
r7      80.561      14.012       5.002       0.425     100.000


----     53 VARIABLE d.L  deviations

            c1          c2          c3          c4

r1       0.374       0.001 1.459087E-5 1.459087E-7
r2       0.414       0.003 9.542419E-5 9.542419E-7
r3       0.462       0.004 2.579521E-4 2.579521E-6
r4       0.469       0.006 4.685327E-4 4.685327E-6
r5       0.475       0.007 7.297223E-4 7.297223E-6
r6       0.522       0.010       0.001 1.123123E-5
r7       0.561       0.012       0.002 1.587126E-5

Steps (2) and (3) have to be inside the optimization model: they have to be executed simultaneously to achieve proven optimal solutions.

The mathematical model can look like:

enter image description here

The model solves within a few seconds to proven global optimality using a solver like Cplex or Gurobi.

I think this is pretty cute model (ok, that is really nerdy, I know). The permutation is modeled with a permutation matrix P (binary values). This makes the model a MIQP (Mixed Integer Quadratic Programming) model. It can be linearized fairly easily: use absolute values instead of squares in the objective. After proper reformulation, we end up with a linear MIP model. There is lots of software available to handle this. This includes libraries and packages callable from Python.

Note: I probably should not divide by init(i,j) in the objective, but rather by the column means in the init matrix. Dividing by y(i,j) would be the best, but that leads to another non-linearity.

  • I appreciate your contribution, however converting this to Python code is way outside my skills base. – Joey Dec 11 '17 at 14:53
  • I suspect an optimization model is simpler to use than it is to design some algorithm that produces something close to optimal. – Erwin Kalvelagen Dec 11 '17 at 19:55
  • I agree with this, would you be able to make some comments next to the lines to help describe what is going on (e.g. special cases?). – Joey Dec 12 '17 at 11:21
  • Are the columns supposed to be ordered (i.e. increasing from LO(j) to HI(j))? – Erwin Kalvelagen Dec 12 '17 at 14:35
  • No, the order doesn't matter as long as the numbers in each column have an evenly spaced (or as close to evenly spaced) distribution between the LO and Hi. Also, I would like to point out that, if the LO/HI of each column needs to be extended/reduced slightly then this is okay (such that the solution is realized). – Joey Dec 12 '17 at 14:40

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