69

I have the following code.

array.map(val => { return {
  key1: val.key1,
  key2: val.key2
}});

Is there any way to reduce the code to something like this?

array.map(val => {
  key1: val.key1,
  key2: val.key2
});

3 Answers 3

139

If you put it in parenthesis the compiler will treat it as an object literal not a code block:

array.map(val => ({
  key1: val.key1,
  key2: val.key2
}));

A type assertion also works if you have an interface for the object literal (but is not as type safe):

interface IKeys { key1: string; key2: string }
array.map(val => <IKeys>{
  key1: val.key1,
  key2: val.key2
});
3
  • 4
    If using React JSX compiler, be aware of using <IKeys> style type assertions as it is ambiguous with JSX grammar and thus you must use {...} as IKeys casting syntax. Mar 8, 2019 at 16:31
  • @guru_florida Can you explain more? And how would it work for Typescript?
    – CyberMew
    Jun 20, 2019 at 3:01
  • 2
    @CyberMew after the => an { is always interpreted as a code block, no exceptions. But after => we can have any expression, including a parenthesis expression (...) and inside this new expression we can have an object literal, but the (...) does not in any other way change the meaning of the object expression. The type assertion <IKey> serves a similar function, it will introduce a new type of expression after the => instead of having the { which always means code block. Hope this makes it a bit more clear Jun 20, 2019 at 12:50
24

As an update to @Titian Cernicova-Dragomir's answer above, it's worth mentioning the as operator (for Type Assertion), especially useful when working with React's TSX(JSX) files, equivalent to the <Type> syntax:

interface IKeys { key1: string; key2: string }
// notice the parentheses, to avoid confusion with a block scope
array.map(val => ({
    key1: val.key1,
    key2: val.key2
} as IKeys));

It was introduced because the angle brackets syntax (<ComponentOrElement>) is reserved for components / JSX Elements.

2
  • This isn't completely type-safe - you will get compile errors if key1/key2 are missing or incorrectly typed, but if you add an additional param key3 you won't get an error.
    – Jonathan
    May 25 at 14:18
  • @Jonathan In a way isn't, but on the other hand, it is like telling TS: "from now on, treat this unknown 'thing' as this particular type" - so it's not a strict contract like in the case of interface. As long as you don't try to use key3, it will be type-safe. I would argue that key3 would be a bit like some unknown prototype. property.
    – ellockie
    May 25 at 23:08
3

None of the above options have worked for me with React's TSX files.

This is the code that worked for me:

interface IKeys { key1: string; key2: string }

array.map((val: any): IKeys => ({
    key1: val.key1,
    key2: val.key2
}));
1
  • This is the only solution that's completely type-safe, unlike as IKeys
    – Jonathan
    May 25 at 14:19

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