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I need to build a lock-free stack implementation. I read this page and I understand the functionality of the listed lock-free push operation.

Now, I have to build a similar version of the pop operation. This is what I've done until now but I think, there are some concurrency problems:

template <class T>
bool CASStack<T>::pop(T& ret) {
node<T>* old_head = head.load(std::memory_order_relaxed);

if(old_head == nullptr) {
    return false;
}

// from here on we can assume that there is an element to pop
node<T>* new_head;

do {
    new_head = old_head->next;
} while(!head.compare_exchange_weak(old_head, new_head, std::memory_order_acquire, std::memory_order_relaxed));

ret = old_head->data;

return true;
}

I think I also will get trouble if I delete old_head after the swap, right?

EDIT: Updated question!

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    Yes, deletion is hard because other threads could still be reading it. RCU has the same problems, and and solves it by deferring deletion until all threads have passes a sync point. (IIRC, with a generation number or something, so you know which pool of old objects can be deleted now). Wikipedia has a diagram. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Read-copy-update#Overview – Peter Cordes Dec 11 '17 at 15:10
  • You should put new_head = old_head->next; inside the CAS retry loop. Think about which variable compare_exchange_weak updates on failure. – Peter Cordes Dec 11 '17 at 15:15
  • Yes, you're right! I'll insert this into the loop. What if we ignore the deletes for a moment: Is it allowed to do old_head->next within compare_exchange_weak? Is this still atomic? – lukasl1991 Dec 11 '17 at 16:01
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    You need (at least) memory order acquire for the pop operation, otherwise objects passed from one thread to another through the stack won't be safely published (i.e,. the receiving thread may see the object in a partially constructed, or otherwise partially modified state). Release is only appropriate for push. – BeeOnRope Dec 13 '17 at 0:21
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    @BeeOnRope: I noticed that, too. See the bottom section of my answer. – Peter Cordes Dec 13 '17 at 14:19
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Your node<T>* new_head = old_head->next; is a red herring; you never use this variable.

In my comments suggesting you needed to put it inside a do{}while(!CAS) loop, I was thinking you were doing head.CAS(old_head, new_head). This would have the problems I was talking about, of putting a possibly-stale pointer into the list if the CAS did have to retry.

But you're actually doing head.CAS(old_head, old_head->next) which generates the "desired" value from the updated old_head every time through the loop. This is actually correct, but hard to follow, so I'd suggest using a do{}while() like so:

node<T>* pop(std::atomic<node<T>*> &head)
{
    // We technically need acquire (or consume) loads of head because we dereference it.
    node<T>* old_head = head.load(std::memory_order_acquire);

    node<T>* new_head;
    do {
        if(old_head == nullptr) {
           // need to re-check because every retry reloads old_head
           // pop in another thread might have emptied the list
            return nullptr;
        }

        new_head = old_head->next;
        // if head still equals old_head this implies the same relation for new_head
    } while(!head.compare_exchange_weak(old_head, new_head,
                                        std::memory_order_acquire));
    // Note the ordering change: acquire for both success and failure

    return old_head;  // defer deletion until some later time
}

Is it allowed to do old_head->next within compare_exchange_weak? Is this still atomic?

The CAS is still atomic. Any compare_exchange_weak that compiles is itself atomic. The compiler evaluates the args before the function call, though, so reading old_head->next isn't part of the atomic transaction that CAS does. It's already been read separately into a temporary. (Doing this explicitly with a separate variable like in the do{}while loop is common.)

If node::next is an atomic<> member of node, you should think about what memory order you want to use for that load. But for a pure stack, it doesn't have to be atomic, because linked-list nodes are never modified while they're on the stack, only before being pushed with the right next pointer. Shared read-only access is not a race.


Usage as a pure stack also reduces deletion problems: threads can't "peek" at the head node or traverse the list. They can only look inside a node after popping it, and the pop algorithm ensures they have exclusive ownership of the node (and are responsible for deleting it).

But pop() itself needs to load from the head node. If another thread races with us and returns the memory for that head to the OS, we could fault. So we do have a deletion problem like RCU does, like I mentioned in a comment.

Simply reusing the memory for something else wouldn't be a problem on most C++ implementations, though: we would read a garbage value for old_head->next, but CAS would fail (because the head pointer must have changed before the old head object was freed) so we'd never do anything with the bogus value we loaded. But it's still C++ UB for our atomic load to race with a non-atomic store. But a compiler would have to prove that this race actually does happen before it's allowed to emit anything other than normal asm, and all mainstream CPUs don't have any problem with such a race in asm.

But unless you can guarantee that free() or delete just put the memory on a free list, i.e. that they don't munmap it between a load of head and a deref of old_head->next, the above reasoning doesn't make it safe for the caller to delete pop's return value right away. It only means problems are very unlikely (and hard to detect with simple testing).


Memory ordering

We load head and then expect that pointer to point to useful values. (i.e. old_head->next). This is exactly what memory_order_consume gives us. But it's hard to use, and so hard to optimize that compilers just strengthen it to acquire, which makes it impossible to test code that uses consume. So we really need acquire for all our loads of head.

Note that getting the value out of the node we pop also depends on memory ordering, but I think if we didn't need old_head->next we could use relaxed everywhere but in the success side of the CAS (where we would need at least consume, so in practice acquire).

(On mainstream C++ implementations we could probably get away with relaxed on all architectures except DEC Alpha AXP, the famously weakly-ordered RISC from the 90s. The compiler will almost certainly create code with data dependencies on the loaded pointer, because it doesn't have any other way to access the values it needs. And all "normal" hardware except Alpha provides the mo_consume style dependency ordering for free. So testing with relaxed would never show problems unless you had one of the rare models of Alpha that actually could produce this reordering in hardware, and a working C++11 implementation for it. But it's still "wrong", and could potentially break with compile-time reordering, or maybe I'm missing something and relaxed might actually break in practice without inlining into something more complex + constant-propagation.)

Note that these mo_acquire loads synchronize-with the mo_release store in the thread that pushed the object pointed to by the current head. This prevents our non-atomic loads from old_head from racing with non-atomic stores to the node in the thread that pushed it.

  • My code looks now like this. The program crashes with received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault when dereferencing the pointer new_head = old_head->next; Whats the problem? – lukasl1991 Dec 14 '17 at 8:53
  • @lukasl1991: oh, we forgot that the nullptr check is needed every time old_head is updated. Derp. (I assume that's the problem if your code looks the code in my answer.) – Peter Cordes Dec 14 '17 at 8:59
  • My code looks similar. The only difference is the signature template <class T> bool CASStack<T>::pop(T& ret) { But if(old_head != nullptr) would not solve the problem in my mind. Do I need an additional CAS there? – lukasl1991 Dec 14 '17 at 14:53
  • +1 on "use acquire not consume". That's my policy: use acquire, it is simple to reason about [1], well supported, doesn't require you and your compiler to understand this fairly crazy "carries dependency" junk. In the very rare case you hit the combination of platform and use-case where this matters, carefully optimize just the few places it matters to use consume and test carefully. [1] Relatively speaking, anyways! – BeeOnRope Dec 14 '17 at 18:41
  • @BeeOnRope: I think you literally can't get full consume performance from current compilers unless you use relaxed and cross your fingers, because they literally treat it as a synonym for acquire until anyone figures out how to correctly implement the carries-dependency stuff. If relaxed doesn't give you correct asm (data-dependent loads) for your target platform, I guess you'd have to write asm by hand? – Peter Cordes Dec 14 '17 at 21:14
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Imagine that between loading old_head and dereferencing old_head->next, the cpu was diverted by an interrupt and didn’t get back to this sequence for a very long time (days, weeks, etc..). Meanwhile, some other thread has popped ‘old_head’ from your stack, processed it, and returned it to a heap and possibly repurposed it for another object.

The reason it works for ‘push’, is that the ‘pushing code' owns the object to be pushed. That isn’t true of ‘pop’ -- pop is discovering the object then attempting to gain ownership of it. To work with ‘lock free’ you must be able to perform both operations simultaneously; which makes linked lists difficult, if not unusable.

By comparison, with an array you know that ‘next’ is ‘top - 1’, so:

do {
   x = stack[temp = top];
} while (cswap(&top, temp, temp-1) != temp);

is temptingly close. The rub is that you need to encode a generation count into top, so that every assignment to ‘top’ is unique:

struct uuidx { int index; very_large_int sequence; };
extern (volatile, atomic, whatever) struct uuidx top;

...
struct uuidx temp, next;
do {
    x = stack[(temp = top).index];
    next = (struct uuidx){.index = temp.index - 1,
                 .sequence = temp.sequence+1};
} while (cswap(&top, temp, next) != temp)
  • It's not clear from the code the OP posted, since it's an apparently incorrectly simplified version of his real code, but he doesn't actually return a reference to the popped object, but rather copies the popped object via the assignment operator into an object passed by the caller. So there is no memory freeing problem here as a copy is made to avoid that issue: the internal objects are not exposed to the caller. The OP provided his actual code here. Why he didn't fix the question to make that clear I don't know. – BeeOnRope Dec 18 '17 at 0:32
  • I updated the question to avoid more confusion. @mevets I think my code is not vulnerable according to the issue "Imagine that between loading old_head and dereferencing old_head->next..." because when the other thread popped old_head away, I can still dereference the pointer old_head->next even if it points to another object now. But if this is the case, old_head does not equal head anymore, so the CAS fails and overwrites old_head with the current value of head. – lukasl1991 Dec 18 '17 at 13:46
  • How do you know you can still dereference it? Is there a hidden garbage collector? If not, it could have been freed to the heap. Since it was released, the region (page) it resides in could have been unmapped, so old_head->next will result in a SIGSEGV. GC changes everything, but not in a good way... – mevets Dec 18 '17 at 16:33
  • The missing of delete is another problem in my algorithm... :-/ – lukasl1991 Dec 19 '17 at 8:44
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This is my solution as far:

template <class T>
bool CASStack<T>::pop(T& ret) {
    node<T>* new_head;

    // get the current head
    node<T>* old_head = head.load(std::memory_order_relaxed);

    do {
        // it is a null pointer iff our stack is empty
        if(old_head == nullptr) {
            return false;
        }

        // otherwise, we can dereference it and access its next node
        new_head = old_head->next;
    } while(!head.compare_exchange_weak(old_head, new_head, std::memory_order_acquire, std::memory_order_relaxed));

    // finally write the popped value into ret
    ret = old_head->data;
    return true;
}

I would highly appreciate your assesment. I know about two issues with this code:

1) If another thread pushes an element between head.load and the nullptr comparison, my algorithm does not pop it. I don't have any idea how to fix this.

2) Within the push operation, elements are created with new. My code crashes, if I add a delete old_head; before return true;. So I know that this algorithm has a memory leak. Could I apply this solution?

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    If another thread pushes an element between head.load and the nullptr comparison, then it happened after this thread attempted to pop. Normally you won't be racing with other threads, so design your code to be efficient in the no-race case and correct in all cases. (And not too slow when there is contention, of course). Depending on the use-case, you might want to spin a few times before returning false, but that definitely isn't better in general. In most use-cases (other than your stress test) if the stack is empty when you check, it will still be empty a few thousand cycles later. – Peter Cordes Dec 17 '17 at 23:36
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    @BeeOnRope: When head.compare_exchange_weak(old_head, ... fails, it loads old_head = head. It's a reference arg. – Peter Cordes Dec 18 '17 at 0:59
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    I don't think atomic<shared_ptr> is allowed because T for atomic<T> must be trivially copyable, and shared_ptr isn't. One approach to the problem you mention is double reference counting. You store something like a pair<Node,count> as head where count is a reference count and Node itself has another count. Every thread that wants to dereference head first increments the count embedded in head using CAS of the entire pair, then it can go ahead and access the Node. When it's done, it increments the reference count inside the Node (nothing gets decremented here). – BeeOnRope Dec 18 '17 at 1:15
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    So the effective reference count is Node.count - head.count, and when that's zero the holding thread can delete Node. You need cmpxchg16 do this simply, although you can probably "pack" this into 64-bits if you were motivated. A reasonable solution though is probably just to use a dedicated allocator that just keeps recycling nodes so they are always "safe" to read, and a generation counter to avoid ABA, which you can pack together into a 64-bit value as head. The packing is easier here since you don't need full pointers: just a node index which could be only as many bits as you need. – BeeOnRope Dec 18 '17 at 1:18
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    @PeterCordes - well if it weren't for the memory management problem, node-based structures would be fairly straightforward and would be the bread and butter of lock-free structures, as they are in academia (which often simply ignores the problem or says "use hazard pointers" or something similar without evaluating the costs) and in garbage collected languages (you also see hybrid structures there like ConcurrentHashMap which does have an array as a key component). You really saw an explosion of concurrent structures and use in Java for example... – BeeOnRope Dec 18 '17 at 17:14

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